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Need a word or phrase translated?

Amami

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悪い男や
何人泣かしとんねん
あのとろっとろの
猫なで声で

コレとか

What is your translation?
I think he said: "Eh... You're such a villain. How many people you made cry with that melting purring voice? / This person."
It's right?
 

Toritoribe

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Yes, you got it right. 猫なで声 is more likely coaxing/wheedling/ingratiating voice, though. (You might already understand this, but "this person" is an example of the people he made cry.)
 

Eristy

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Hi, I need help understanding one sentence. Context is: a girl is talking to her friend about her mother, how she was for example very smart, but bad at housework and jealous of her husband. She says she was アレな人だ。

And at the end of telling that story, she says 私がそのまま大人になったような感じと言えばどれだけアレかわかる?I don't understand the first part of that sentence. Could you please help me translate it? Also, how would you translate アレ in that context?
 

Toritoribe

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お母さんは、私がそのまま大人になったような感じ makes sense?
アレ means やばい, 危ない, 変わってる or like that.
 

Tigali

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Hey, I'd need a hand with a specific phrase. Well, actually with a lot of them. Translating a manga without having the language skill required is kinda hard. But I'll make efforts before being annoying, so I'll just start with one.

「"これから巻きおこる大冒険の予感がしたんだ。」

With context, I more or less understood this meant "From then on, I had the feeling of a [makiokoru] adventure." I'm puzzled about the meaning of 巻きおこる in that context though. I think that's the verb 巻き起こる, but I don't see how its common meaning ("to arise") could be interpreted in that situation. Looking it up on Linguee, I found examples where it meant "strange", but I wasn't able to confirm this elsewhere.
Also, if I understoood the rest of the sentence wrong, please let me know. Thanks in advance !
 

Majestic

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arise, begin, develop, or in this case I would say "unfold" is a good translation.

I had a premonition of the great adventure that was about to unfold (unroll, begin, etc)

The verb structure in the English is different from the original source language, but in this case if you try to replicate the Japanese word and grammar structure in a one-to-one translation into English, you will end up with an English phrase that makes no sense. "I felt that from here great adventure arising" So you need to abandon the word-for-word translation and embrace an English idiom that carries the same meaning.
 

Tigali

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Thanks! I think I'll use that.

Don't worry, I'm only using word-to-word translations to get all the semantics; when i have every bit of meaning translated, I rearrange them and refine my sentence. Besides, I'm translating in French, I'm only using English to communicate here.
 

Toritoribe

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Incidentally, これから actually modifies 巻きおこる, not 予感がしたんだ, thus, the whole clause これから巻きおこる modifies 大冒険, literally meaning "the great adventure that would unfold from now on/in the future" (and I believe Majestic-san's translation "was about to unfold" connote this meaning).

Besides, I'm translating in French, I'm only using English to communicate here.
The poster right above you has been doing the same work as you in Polish (ask in English, get replies in English, and then translate it into Polish).;)
 
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What would Japanese normally say if they need to alight from train and there is a person blocking the way?
In Russia we usually ask: "Выходите?" (Are you getting off?)
In China i was taught to use gu wo isha (Let me get off)

If there is more than one expression - please explain them and different situations they are used in.
 

Tigali

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Incidentally, これから actually modifies 巻きおこる, not 予感がしたんだ, thus, the whole clause これから巻きおこる modifies 大冒険, literally meaning "the great adventure that would unfold from now on/in the future" (and I believe Majestic-san's translation "was about to unfold" connote this meaning).
Oh, yeah, thanks, that makes even more sense to me now. The subject (こいつとの出会いは) being in another speech bubble next to it. In total, I translated as

"QUAND J'AI RENCONTRÉ CE TYPE...
J'AI EU LE PRESSENTIMENT QU'UNE GRANDE AVENTURE ÉTAIT SUR LE POINT DE DÉBUTER."


Roughly "when I met this guy... I had a feeling a great adventure was about to begin."
 

Majestic

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What would Japanese normally say if they need to alight from train and there is a person blocking the way?
すみません! Obvious enough, but sometimes it doesn't produce the desired results, and you need to be a bit more forceful.

When you need to be more forceful (or, when you are more desperate to break through the crowd)
 
おります! I'm getting off ! (slightly more forceful than the above, but commonly heard on crowded trains). It sort of announces to everyone around that you will be coming through the crowd.
 

Toritoribe

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What would Japanese normally say if they need to alight from train and there is a person blocking the way?
In Russia we usually ask: "Выходите?" (Are you getting off?)
In China i was taught to use gu wo isha (Let me get off)

If there is more than one expression - please explain them and different situations they are used in.
As Majestic-san wrote, すいません。 with moving towards the door is the most common way. せ is sometimes pronounced as a long vowel like すいませーん to make it sound softer. You can also use those two words at the same time; すいませ(ー)ん。降りま(ー)す。.

Oh, yeah, thanks, that makes even more sense to me now. The subject (こいつとの出会いは) being in another speech bubble next to it. In total, I translated as

"QUAND J'AI RENCONTRÉ CE TYPE...
J'AI EU LE PRESSENTIMENT QU'UNE GRANDE AVENTURE ÉTAIT SUR LE POINT DE DÉBUTER."


Roughly "when I met this guy... I had a feeling a great adventure was about to begin."
Yes, you got it!
 

Tigali

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Hey, me again!

I'd like to check something with you with the following sentence:

「こんな寒い村でアンタだけ一度も白い息をはいてねぇ」

I translated it (roughly, still translating it to French first) as "In a village that cold, you're the only one who doesn't make mist when breathing."
But it don't understand what はいてねぇ means, what verb it is. I got the negation, but I'd like to be sure I didn't miss anything with this part.

Subsidiary question: I see だろ being written quite often at the end of sentences. Is that another way to say/write だろう?
 

Oatsy

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Hi! New person. Sadly, registered just for this.

Normally I can kinda find out whatever through searching a bit but I haven't been able to find anything helpful for this.

I was playing something and a character says "あーしろ こーしろ” (Full dialogue is 「いいもんだよ あーしろ こーしろと 指図する人 いないし」 Which I'm pretty sure is "That's good too ( ) don't need someone telling you what to do" but doesn't seem to help really.


Only things I found are song lyrics.
 
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Toritoribe

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I'd like to check something with you with the following sentence:

「こんな寒い村でアンタだけ一度も白い息をはいてねぇ」

I translated it (roughly, still translating it to French first) as "In a village that cold, you're the only one who doesn't make mist when breathing."
But it don't understand what はいてねぇ means, what verb it is. I got the negation, but I'd like to be sure I didn't miss anything with this part.
Yes, はいてねぇ is a slangy expression of はいていない, i.e., the negative form of the -te iru form of 吐く mostly used by male. 息を吐く means "to breathe out" as an idiom.

You got the gist of it correctly, but 一度も~ていない expresses "inexperienced", so the more literal translation is "you're the only one who has never made mist when breathing".

Subsidiary question: I see だろ being written quite often at the end of sentences. Is that another way to say/write だろう?
Yes.


I was playing something and a character says "あーしろ こーしろ” (Full dialogue is 「いいもんだよ あーしろ こーしろと 指図する人 いないし」 Which I'm pretty sure is "That's good too ( ) don't need someone telling you what to do" but doesn't seem to help really.
あーしろ and こーしろ are just a variation of ああしろ and こうしろ, respectively. しろ is an imperative form of する, so those mean "do like that" and "do like this".

I don't know where you got "too" and "to need" from, but those words are not in the original Japanese sentence. You confused いない with いない, by any chance?
 

Tigali

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Thanks once again! I'll try finding a compromise between the litteral meaning and a good French sentence.
 

Oatsy

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あーしろ and こーしろ are just a variation of ああしろ and こうしろ, respectively. しろ is an imperative form of する, so those mean "do like that" and "do like this".
Ah! The しろ being する conjugation was the only thing I maybe found at one point but I brushed it off since I couldn't work it out tbh. Thank you!

I don't know where you got "too" and "to need" from, but those words are not in the original Japanese sentence. You confused いない with いない, by any chance?
Yes, the いらない vs いない mistake is exactly what happened. 🤦

The too guess was from いい

Placement seemed weird but it was my only guess there.
 

Toritoribe

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もん is the colloquial version of もの.
 

Toritoribe

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The explanatory の/ん can be attached only to verbs, adjectives or copula(the attributive form な), thus, "particle も + ん" is ungrammatical. That's why your interpretation can't be correct.
 

Tigali

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Hey, I'm stuck (again) with the manga I'm translating...

『「誰にも飼いならせない」のも盗賊だぜ』

So apparently the quote within the sentence means "no one can tame" and it's from the opera Carmen ("Love is a rebel bird that no one can tame" etc).
First it doesn't make a lot of sense for this character (slave turned thief, allergic to books at this point, though litterate) in a fantasy setting to quote Earth opera but there's some real-life references thoughout the saga so, why not? But I'd like to make sure I'm not misinterpretating the reference here (as the quotation marks lead me to believe it's one, and it's not from earlier in the work).
And then, I'm not too sure what the particles の and も do in this sentence.

Could you help please?
 

Toritoribe

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の is a nominalizer, and も is "too/also". も is used to show that 「誰にも飼いならせない」 is one of the characteristics of thieves there.
 
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