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Jessman

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Hey guys!
I've been reading up on the Japanese good luck flags of WW2. This forum has been a great treasure trove of knowledge! I'm excited to say that I have purchased one of the fantastic pieces of history and was wondering if anyone had any knowledge about this particular flag. There's not much to it compared to other flags but I also have no idea what it says. there could be a nugget of history in there that I'm not aware of. Also if you think this could be a forgery please let me know so I can send it back to the seller, as I have not received it yet in the mail. indications are that the flag is authentic but I'd like some experts to on the subject to verify. I have more pictures if needed so just let me know! Thanks in advance!
 

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Toritoribe

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祝凱旋
松村部隊
Congratulations on your triumphant return
Matumura troop


部隊長親戚
Commander's relative(s)

I can't judge the authenticity, but it's uncommon to use the word 親戚 in that context.
 

Jessman

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Thank you, Toritoribe! I appreciate the translation. I did ask the seller after posting the flag on here and he did say it said "Congratulations on the triumphant return, Matumura." I've done some research on the subject of good luck flags during WW2 and it looks to check most boxes of authenticity. I also learned that the Japanese language had changed some after imperial Japan fell in 1945. Could that possibly be the reason that the word
親戚 is uncommon in that context or was it uncommon to use that in that context back in imperial Japan?

祝凱旋
松村部隊
Congratulations on your triumphant return
Matumura troop


部隊長親戚
Commander's relative(s)

I can't judge the authenticity, but it's uncommon to use the word 親戚 in that context.
 

Toritoribe

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Could that possibly be the reason that the word
親戚 is uncommon in that context or was it uncommon to use that in that context back in imperial Japan?
It's the latter. If the flag was presented his relatives, 親戚一同 or 親族一同 is more commonly used.
 
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