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Buntaro

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Hi everyone,

I would like to know if the correct translation for "kamikaze pilot" into Japanese is 特攻隊 (tokkoutai). Or maybe 特攻隊機長? Is it true Japanese people do not understand the term "kamikaze pilot" when used while speaking in Japanese?
 

Toritoribe

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機長 refers to a captain/leader of a team, so it's not used for each pilot of a one-seater airplane. Just 特攻隊 can make sense, and you can also use 特攻隊隊員.

Is it true Japanese people do not understand the term "kamikaze pilot" when used while speaking in Japanese?
well, I don't think so, but 特攻隊隊員 would be more common.
 

Buntaro

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What is the best way to say “go to college” meaning attend college for four years and get a degree? I doubt that 大学へ行く or 大学から卒業する have the same meaning.
 

mdchachi

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What is the best way to say “go to college” meaning attend college for four years and get a degree? I doubt that 大学へ行く or 大学から卒業する have the same meaning.
I think the answer may change depending on what you want to say (ie future tense or past and whether you're talking about yourself or somebody else).
 

Buntaro

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How about when I am talking about myself and what I want to do in the future? For example, "I want to go to college and get a degree in Japanese History."
 

Majestic

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And just as in English, "going to college" or "want to go to college" in Japanese also implies intent or desire to graduate, even if it isn't explicitly stated.
 

Buntaro

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I want to thank everyone for their help.

Okay, let’s take this two steps further. I want to say:

I want to go to college, then get a Master’s Degree, then get a Ph.D.

How is this:

大学に行き、修士号を取って、博士に成りたいです。
 

Toritoribe

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大学に行き、そのあと大学院で修士号と博士号を取りたいです。

修士号 and 博士号 can be gotten in 大学院.
 

Tigali

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Hey! I wanted to thank you for your previous help allowing me to complete my translation project. Now I've moved on to another and I was wondering about the phrase "そらよ". I've heard it orally too but never understood the meaning. Does it have something to do with 反る+the よ particle?
 

Toritoribe

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It's an interjection mostly used when throwing or handing something to the listener, as same as ほらよ, それ or ほれ.
 

techiex

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I recently got an Intermediate Japanese textbook and am working on translating the intro for myself, so that I can come to a full understanding of grammar and structure and why things are used.

「総合日本語初級から中級へ」について
This is the overhead banner. I figure it means, 'About 'Integrated Japanese from Beginner to Intermediate''. At least, I believe that's what 'ni tsuite' is all about...'about'/'concerning'.

この「総合日本語初級から中級へ」は、「日本語ジャーナル’」にのせた「現代日本語総合講座」をまとめたものです。
Here's my crack at it. "This 'Integrated Japanese from Beginner to Intermediate' is a summary of Nihongo Journal's 'Integrated Courses in Modern Japanese'."

1989年1月号から1990年3月号までの記事を入れました。
My go. "It draws from articles from January, 1989, to March, 1990."

1988年に出版された「総合日本語中級前期」にくらべて、少しやさしくしてあります。
This one is much trickier for me. Something about, 'it's easier than 1988's publication of 'Integrated First Term in Intermediate Japanese'.

1 - In my first example, まとめ is a word I learned as 'summary', so まとめたもの struck me as 'something that was summarized', is my thinking correct?
2 - What is にのせた in the second example?
3 - What is にくらべて in the third example?
4 - What's the grammatical explanation of 〜くしてあります?
While it is unclear as to which book you are referring about I found the following: "Intermediate Japanese" I found the following which I am reading now: A book by Nobuko MItzutani titled" Intermediate Japanase: an Integrated Course first semester"
 
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Toritoribe

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The book the OP was talking about was 総合日本語―初級から中級へ, while the book you are reading is 総合日本語中級〈前期〉, which was mentioned "1988年に出版された「総合日本語中級前期」" in the post.

総合日本語―初級から中級へ
INTRODUCTION TO INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE: AN INTEGRATED COURSE

総合日本語中級〈前期〉
INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE: AN INTEGRATED COURSE FIRST SEMESTER

It's posted 8 years ago, by the way.;)
 
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LiXiQing

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Does the phrase "まるで爪のようだと鬼ホミコーシスから食べ物視される" have a sense in Japanese? "鬼ホミコーシス" is a kind of wordplay on nail disease onychomycosis. I tried to write in Japanese "Onychomycosis looks at (and regards) your nails as if it's food."
 

Buntaro

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I have a question about the Japanese expletive "Masaka!" ("You have got to be kidding!") Is this Josei no kotoba only? Or do men also use it?
 

bentenmusume

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Buntaro said:
I have a question about the Japanese expletive "Masaka!"
Just to follow up on Toritoribe-san's explanation, I don't think まさか should be considered an "expletive".
It's not vulgar, nor is it semantically null or devoid of meaning (which are the two definitions of the word as I understand it).

It's an interjection when used alone, and can also be used adverbially in a full sentence, e.g.:
まさか自分が感染するとは思わなかった (just an example sentence; I don't have COVID ;))
or as an adjectival noun, e.g. まさかの状況.
 

bentenmusume

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Hmm, I tend to distinguish between an interjection and an "expletive", but perhaps the latter can also be used to mean the former.

In any event, I wanted to point out that まさか can be used as more than just an independent exclamatory expression, so I hope I've contributed something more than being needlessly (and possibly erroneously) pedantic. ;)
 
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