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5th newspaper translation: 専門家会議「ウイルスを広げないために今から2週間が大事」

Zizka

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The article is available there.
専門家会議「ウイルスを広げないために今から2週間が大事」
Assembly of Experts: In order for the virus not to spread, the two weeks from now are important.
There’s no mention of 次 here for “next two weeks” but I don’t know how to word it otherwise so I went with “two weeks from now”.
 

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いま日本では、新しいコロナウイルスがうつる人が増えています。
Right now in Japan, the number of people infected with the new Corona virus is increasing.”
 

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国の専門家会議は「ウイルス広げないために、今から2週間ぐらいが大事です。
The national comity of Experts said: "In order for the virus not to spread, the two weeks from now will be important."
 
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There’s no mention of 次 here for “next two weeks” but I don’t know how to word it otherwise so I went with “two weeks from now”.
"two weeks from now" normally means the time starting two weeks after the current time. Because you use the present tense that's clearly not what you mean, but it makes a strange sounding sentence.

You could say "the two weeks starting from today". but by definition that means exactly the same thing as "the next two weeks".

いま日本では、新しいコロナウイルスがうつる人が増えています。
Right now in Japan, the number of people infected with the new Corona virus is increasing.”
Your understanding is correct, but it should be "the novel Coranavirus" in English.

It effectively means the same thing, but 'novel Coronavirus' is the name it was originally given; it has since been renamed COVID-19 but since nobody knows that yet instead of being actually called "COVID-19" it's being called "the novel Coronavirus that health authorities have named COVID-19".

COVID-19 is, by the way, supposed to indicate "Coronavirus identified in 2019".
 

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次のことに気をつけてください」と言いました。
Be careful about the next thing please.
(end of quotation which started in the previous sentence).

Not 100% sure here. 次のこと followed by に. A request is done.
 

Zizka

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I mean: ~ください➡request, just like in the sentence under.

病院でウイルスがうつらないように、体の具合が少し悪いだけのときは、家で休んでください。
In order for the virus not to spread, if your condition is just a little bad, please remain home and rest.

I just realized something, since both ために and ように can mean 'in order to'... what's the difference or are they simply interchangeable?
 
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I mean: ~ください➡request, just like in the sentence under.
Ah. "A request is made", then. "A request is done" means someone does the thing that was requested.

病院でウイルスがうつらないように、体の具合が少し悪いだけのときは、家で休んでください。
In order for the virus not to spread, if your condition is just a little bad, please remain home and rest.
You're missing an important word.
 

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I think you mean 「病院」 the hospital.
In order for the virus not to spread at the hospital, if your condition is just a little bad, stay home and rest.
 

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I just realized something, since both ために and ように can mean 'in order to'... what's the difference or are they simply interchangeable?
I'll leave this there. I've done some research on google but there seems to be different opinions about this.

かぜのような体の具合や37.5℃以上の熱が4日以上続くときは、都道府県にある「帰国者・接触者相談センター」に相談してください。

As far as parsing is concerned:
[[かぜのような体の具合や37.5℃以上の熱が]4日以上続くときは]
I was thinking of this ↑ to start with.
 
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You seem to be on the right track.

I just realized something, since both ために and ように can mean 'in order to'... what's the difference or are they simply interchangeable?

I'll leave this there. I've done some research on google but there seems to be different opinions about this.


I don't see a difference of opinion after checking a few links, but 「~ために」と「~ように」の違い | 毎日のんびり日本語教師 is particularly thorough about explaining.

In short, AためにB is used when A and B have the same subject, or A is noun+の, A is not a negative verb, and the subject has the ability to make B happen.

AようにB is used when A is negative, when A and B do not have the same subject, or when B is something the subject cannot control.
 

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Regarding 「 かぜのような 」I'm wondering how to put this.
Is it one of those situations like the non-exhaustive 「や」 where no translation is necessary?
The way I understand it, 「ような」(I don't have my dictionary with me at the moment) is a pre-noun adjectival meaning ''similar to''. Gives ように as a reference which was I thought was weird as ように means 'in order to' which is clearly different from ''similar to''.

So I googled a bit and it turns out some websites merge ように/ような together:
1582664163658.png


This website merges them together as well.

I'm assuming this means that ように can sometimes mean 'similar to' or 'in order' depending on the context while ような can only mean similar to. I want to make sure about this before moving forward.

Regardless, what's the best way to word かぜのような? I realize it means: "something similar to a cold". Also, could I remove the の there? If so, would the meaning remain the same?
 
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I'm assuming this means that ように can sometimes mean 'similar to' or 'in order' depending on the context while ような can only mean similar to
Yes. ADoBJG has entries on yōni(1) ('in order to'), yōni(2) ('similar to'), and yōna. I thought you had looked at them when you first ran into trouble mistaking an 'in order to' for a 'similar to'.



Regardless, what's the best way to word かぜのような? I realize it means: "something similar to a cold". Also, could I remove the の there? If so, would the meaning remain the same?

No, you can't remove the の, it's a necessary connector for a noun.

かぜのような体の具合 is literally "a condition of the body like a cold", but the matching natural expression in English is "cold-like symptoms".

For general translation of かぜのような you'll have to take it case-by-case, but "cold-like" or "like a cold" are common.
 
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Toritoribe

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I just realized something, since both ために and ように can mean 'in order to'... what's the difference or are they simply interchangeable?
I already explained about the two meanings of ~ため(に).
Aため(に)B
when the subject of B can control A: "in order to"
when the subject of B can't control A: "because"

Aよう(に)B
when the subject of B can control A: "like/as if"
when the subject of B can't control A: "in order to"

Refer to the following thread about ~よう(に).

Thus, they are not interchangeable.

The things explained in the page Chiris-san provided (negative, potential, volitional/non-volitional, the subjects are different in the two clauses etc.) are about "whether the subject of B can control A or not" after all.
 

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I know you already explained ため, it was on Saturday 😅.

No, you can't remove the の, it's a necessary connector for a noun.

I often wonder why a の can sometimes be omitted and sometimes cannot. Sometimes it seems like you can just put two nouns together without の but at other times it's necessary.
 

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Generally speaking, の is often not needed for compound words like 日本代表部 or 専門家会議, and it's necessary for suffix-like usages like ため(の/に) or よう(の/に). There are words where の is not used like 唐様(からよう), meaning chinoiserie/Chinese-like, but this よう is more likely a compound word, as you can see.
 

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かぜのような体の具合や37.5℃以上の熱が4日以上続くときは
If your body is like it has a cold/cold-like and has a temperature no less than 37.5 degree celcius and does so for at least four days...
都道府県にある→ an administrative division of Japan.
I did a bit of research and this means the 47 prefectures of Japan.

But more importantly what is that: 接触者相談センター?
It’s a center of something but I googled and all the results are in Japanese even if I try to get an English result. Google translates it as “Contact Center” but I’m always skeptical about google translations anyway.
 
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The name given in the article is actually 「帰国者・接触者相談センター」 and the full name is 「新型コロナウイルスに関する帰国者・接触者相談センター」.

The meaning should be evident from the name, certainly from the full name if there had been any doubt with the shorter name used in the article.

In any case, the official English page uses "consultation center" as the translation.
 
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