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Nikui - how to use it

musicisgood

Sempai
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nikui = like hard to do

Can I use "nikui ' in ... Japanese is hard for me to learn?
 

nice gaijin

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The construction with nikui is verb root+nikui (+desu to make it polite). Be careful because this construction can have an unintended meaning. Never use tabenikui for your wife's cooking, or minikui unless you intend to be insulting.

It's the same as if you're trying to say "I want to [verb]." There are three kinds of verbs that are conjugated slightly differently, but the pattern is pretty obvious:
dictionary/plain form (type)polite formwant to doeasy to dohard to do
食べる taberu (ichidan verb)tabemasutabetaitabeyasuitabenikui ("hard to eat," but also means not good, like mazui. Use with caution!)
見る miru (ichidan verb)mimasumitaimiyasuiminikui (though this is "hard to see," it actually means "hard to look at/ugly." use with caution!) If you want to say "I can't see something (well), use "mienai"
見つける mitsukeru (ichidan verb)mitsukemasumitsuketaimitsukeyasuimitsukenikui - hard to find. Can mean something is rare, depending on the context
切る kiru (godan verb)kirimasukiritaikiriyasuikirinikui - hard to cut
読む yomu (godan verb)yomimasuyomitaiyomiyasuiyominikui - hard to read (could mean the character isn't written well, or that you have trouble recognizing what it says)
書く kaku (godan verb)kakimasukakitaikakiyasuikakinikui - hard to write
作る tsukuru (godan verb)tsukurimasutsukuritaitsukuriyasuitsukurinikui - hard to make
する suru (irregular verb)shimasushitaishiyasuishinikui - hard to do

you can also なかなか before verb+nikui, to emphasize that it's not easily done, or not easy to do well. Listen to native speakers and try to imitate how they use this construction.

~nikui and ~yasui themselves are conjugated like i-adjectives, hence the +desu to make it a formal sentence.
 
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musicisgood

Sempai
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The construction with nikui is verb root+nikui (+desu to make it polite). Be careful because this construction can have an unintended meaning. Never use tabenikui for your wife's cooking, or minikui unless you intend to be insulting.

It's the same as if you're trying to say "I want to [verb]." There are three kinds of verbs that are conjugated slightly differently, but the pattern is pretty obvious:
dictionary/plain form (type)polite formwant to doeasy to dohard to do
食べる taberu (ichidan verb)tabemasutabetaitabeyasuitabenikui ("hard to eat," but also means not good, like mazui. Use with caution!)
見る miru (ichidan verb)mimasumitaimiyasuiminikui (though this is "hard to see," it actually means "hard to look at/ugly." use with caution!) If you want to say "I can't see something (well), use "mienai"
見つける mitsukeru (ichidan verb)mitsukemasumitsuketaimitsukeyasuimitsukenikui - hard to find. Can mean something is rare, depending on the context
切る kiru (godan verb)kirimasukiritaikiriyasuikirinikui - hard to cut
読む yomu (godan verb)yomimasuyomitaiyomiyasuiyominikui - hard to read (could mean the character isn't written well, or that you have trouble recognizing what it says)
書く kaku (godan verb)kakimasukakitaikakiyasuikakinikui - hard to write
作る tsukuru (godan verb)tsukurimasutsukuritaitsukuriyasuitsukurinikui - hard to make
する suru (irregular verb)shimasushitaishiyasuishinikui - hard to do

you can also なかなか before verb+nikui, to emphasize that it's not easily done, or not easy to do well. Listen to native speakers and try to imitate how they use this construction.

~nikui and ~yasui themselves are conjugated like i-adjectives, hence the +desu to make it a formal sentence.
Thank you for taking the time to explain this. Much appreciated.
 
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