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Meaning of "Kokoro no Tsurugi"

エッジさん

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I've seen this phrase before: Kokoro no Tsurugi. 心の剣
"Sword of the Heart" or something like "The mind's sword".
コトバンク [ 時事問題、ニュースもわかるネット百科事典 ] seems to give it a negative connotation. Like it's some viewpoint or action that is harmful to yourself or others? That's sorta what I gathered from the statement.

There's a song basically about an individual living in a fantasy world, but he needs to break out and join the real world.
The ending almost seems like it uses the term in a positive sense.
I don't know if he's acknowledging that facing reality will bring pain? So he refers to it a "sword of the heart". Or is he saying that his mindset (heart/mind's sword) can help him conquer reality?

This is the reason I ask because the term is too ambiguous for me as a westerner.
The question basically is what's definition of the phrase "Kokoro no Tsurugi"? If anyone can offer examples that would be wonderful.
 
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Toritoribe

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The definition/explanation you found in a dictionary is a usage/meaning in classical literary works over 300 years ago. The same goes with a similar word "kokoro no yaiba".

However, it's neutral nowadays. There is no specific connotation in the word, so the nuance, positive or negative, totally differs depending on the context.
 

エッジさん

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The definition/explanation you found in a dictionary is a usage/meaning in classical literary works over 300 years ago. The same goes with a similar word "kokoro no yaiba".

However, it's neutral nowadays. There is no specific connotation in the word, so the nuance, positive or negative, totally differs depending on the context.
Ok, thank you so much
 
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