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Japanese tattoo

Anouki

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Hi there!
I need your help finding out the right quote for my first tattoo. The first thing I need to say is that it has to be something short because I'm gonna get it on my upper forearm. My original idea was to get a quote from Princess Mononoke which states "to see with eyes unclouded by hate", but, looking on this site, I found out that what Ashitaka says in japanese is a bit different. May I ask you to tell me the name of some japanese poets or instead some ideas? Thank you in advance.
 

cocoichi

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Hi there!
I need your help finding out the right quote for my first tattoo. The first thing I need to say is that it has to be something short because I'm gonna get it on my upper forearm. My original idea was to get a quote from Princess Mononoke which states "to see with eyes unclouded by hate", but, looking on this site, I found out that what Ashitaka says in japanese is a bit different. May I ask you to tell me the name of some japanese poets or instead some ideas? Thank you in advance.

It is totally up to you ofcourse, but I wonder if this is the way to go? You are gonna put it on your body permanently, and obviously you will not have any emotional attachment to the quote.

Now, if you want to go down this road of picking a quote or saying, there is only one that I know by heart: Ichigo Ichie, so that should be short enough to put on your arm. Many years ago when I finished my internship at a company in Japan, one of my coworkers wrote this on a postcard and gave it to me. IF I would ever get a tattoo, besides the kanji names of my daughters, I would go for this one.

Ichi-go ichi-e (Japanese: , lit. "one time, one meeting") [it͡ɕi.ɡo it͡ɕi.e] is a Japanese four-character idiom (yojijukugo) that describes a cultural concept of treasuring the unrepeatable nature of a moment. The term has been translated as "for this time only," and "once in a lifetime." The term reminds people to cherish any gathering that they may take part in, citing the fact that any moment in life cannot be repeated; even when the same group of people get together in the same place again, a particular gathering will never be replicated, and thus each moment is always a once-in-a-lifetime experience.[1] The concept is most commonly associated with Japanese tea ceremonies, especially tea masters Sen no Rikyū and Ii Naosuke.
 
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