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Question Can you say, "My daughter studies in Australia (now)"?

hirashin

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Dear native English speakers,
I think (a) is used, but how about (b) and (c)?
Do they sound strange?

(a) My daughter is studying in Australia (now).
(b) My daughter studies in Australia.
(c) My daughter studies in Australia now.

How about these?
(d) I live in Japan now.
(e) I'm living in Japan now.

Hirashin
 

mdchachi

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Do they sound strange?

(a) My daughter is studying in Australia (now).
(b) My daughter studies in Australia.
(c) My daughter studies in Australia now.
I think they are all ok and not strange. Of course in a real conversation you would probably include what she is studying.

(a) My daughter is studying phlebotomy in Australia (now).
(b) My daughter studies phlebotomy in Australia.
(c) My daughter studies phlebotomy in Australia now.

How about these?
(d) I live in Japan now.
(e) I'm living in Japan now.
Both sound good to me.
 

hirashin

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Thanks, mdchachi. Is it that in your conversation you usually add the object noun after "study"? Do (a), (b), and (c) sound bookish?

Another native speaker says like this:
"My daughter is studying in Australia now" is correct, and it's natural and normal. And it's commonly said that way.
"My daughter studies in Australia now" is correct, but it doesn't sound natural.

What do you think?

How about these sentences without the object? Do they sound natural?
(f) Fred is studying to be a doctor.
(g) I'm studying under a well-known professor at London University.
(h) My son studies hard.
 

mdchachi

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Is it that in your conversation you usually add the object noun after "study"? Do (a), (b), and (c) sound bookish?
It depends on what I am trying to convey. In this case it seems the main point is that your daughter is in Australia now. If I only wanted to say that my daughter is going to school in Australia then I would say "My daughter is going to school in Australia" I wouldn't say "studying." "Studying" by itself doesn't have much meaning. On the other hand, if my son is in his room doing his homework and I wanted tell somebody that he's busy then it doesn't really matter what he's studying. So I'd say "He's studying his room now" or "He's doing his homework now."
(a)(b)(c) don't sound particularly bookish except, as I said, normally I'd expect to know what they are studying.

Another native speaker says like this:
"My daughter is studying in Australia now" is correct, and it's natural and normal. And it's commonly said that way.
"My daughter studies in Australia now" is correct, but it doesn't sound natural.

What do you think?
S/he's correct in that the first one is more commonly used.
To me, the most unnatural part is omitting what the daughter is studying.
Try other verbs like
"My daughter is working in Australia now."
"My daughter works in Australian now."
I think these sound perfectly natural.

How about these sentences without the object? Do they sound natural?
(f) Fred is studying to be a doctor.
(g) I'm studying under a well-known professor at London University.
(h) My son studies hard.
Yes these sound fine.
 
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