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hirashin

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Hello again, native English speakers.

Which would be used?

a) See you Monday morning.
b) See you on Monday morning.
c) See you in Monday morning.
d) See you next Monday morning.

Hirashin
 

Uncle Frank

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I like (a) best , but (b) is also good. (c) is not right because of the (in). (d) moves the time a week ahead; in other words I won't see you this Monday , I will see you next Monday(a week later).

Uncle Frank
 

hirashin

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Thanks for the help, Frank.

If you say "See you next Monday morning" on Friday, does it mean you will see
the other person in ten days?

Hirashin
 

OoTmaster

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Yeah it does. If you wanted to say the coming monday you would say something like. "See you this monday." or "See you monday."
 

Mike Cash

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No, it doesn't. From Friday the next Monday is three days hence. The two days are in different weeks.
 

OoTmaster

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I would never use it that way. Just because the monday is so close to the current day. If someone said next monday to me in that context I would assume they meant 10 days from now. Althought I have heard people use it to refer to the monday 3 days from now. I have actually seen and heard it both ways. I personally would never use it for a day so close though. Maybe if it were a tuesday and I meant the monday 6 days from now. Maybe that is just personal preference though.
 

ClarkH

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a and d are good. b is also okay, but I think a little less natural. It's still okay though.

There is very frequently confusion when people use "next" in this context! So often, the person you are speaking with would have to ask for clarification.

"Don't forget, we have a conference next weekend."
"Oh, was is that in one week or two weeks?"

Whether there is some formal correct way to use "next" does not matter, because people are very frequently confused by its usage anyway. To avoid confusion, avoid using "next" in this way.
 

Mike Cash

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"A week from Monday"
"A week from next Monday"
"A week from this coming Monday"

or, common usage in my home area: "Monday week"

would all indicate the ten days away Monday.

One or two days before would almost certainly require clarification, as those would more typically be referred to as "tomorrow" or "the day after tomorrow" and the failure to use these common expressions where expected could cause a listener to seek clarification.
 

OoTmaster

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I'm curious. What is your home area mike cash? I have never heard "monday week". And I have been all over the united states.
 

Mike Cash

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West Tennessee. The usage may not be common among younger people, Regionalisms have a way of disappearing.
 

jeisan

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"A week from Monday"
"A week from next Monday"
"A week from this coming Monday"

or, common usage in my home area: "Monday week"

would all indicate the ten days away Monday.

You can also add these to the list:
"Not this Monday, next Monday"
"Monday after next"
 

alecgraham

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Native speakers often disagree about whether "next Monday" means this Monday or the Monday after this one. I think the latter choice, the Monday after this, is technically correct, but it is best to confirm with a calendar date. :)
 
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