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襲 how to analyze it (upper right)

johnnyG

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This was in the paper today, connected to Hakuho's retirement--occurred in 襲名. Giving up his sumo name, tossing it back into the pool, etc.

I've looked it up, seen many of the compounds it's in (maybe more often used as 'raid' or 'attack', probably good for a sumo name), and no question there. But, what is the upper right part ? Initially I thought that part started with a two stroke element (something like ヒ) but it's obviously not that.

Yes, I know that I've asked about stroke order before, and have been directed to a site or two that shows that. I can write this (okay, one way or another), but how is the upper right part analyzed? The first three or four strokes is what I wonder about (as a sub element), since the next four or five fall more within my expectations.
 

Toritoribe

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The first stroke is the upper horizontal line, and "the left vertical line + lower horizontal line + right vertical line" is written in a single stroke.


襲 means "to succeed" here, so 襲名する is 名を襲ぐ なをつぐ "to succeed a name". Thus, 年寄「間垣」を襲名した means that he succeeded a Toshiyori name Magaki.
 

johnnyG

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I'm trying to analyze the parts, to see what they are. In the same way that strokes 1-5, and 6-9 (even those together), and the the final six (bottom) form common elements of kanji.

So (a) do strokes 10-11 (12) form an element,

or (b) do strokes (12) 13-16 form an element?

Are there any other kanji that use (a) or (b)? --or 10-16 as a whole?

I don't think I've seen (a) before, but I think I've seen (b) in some form, but I'm not good enough to spin thru my mind looking, and searching has been futile.

Also, while these may not be traditionally accepted parts/elements of kanji, I'd wonder if Heisig would have named/separated this part of the kanji in that system (as two parts, or one).

edit: Got one that just leaves off the bottom--龍.
 
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nice gaijin

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Yeah if you look at the kanji info for you see that the listed radical is the entire kanji itself. I don't think I've seen any other kanji that uses just the right side of it, come to think of it.

Strangely enough, when I look up it doesn't list 龍 as a radical for it though.
 

johnnyG

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Found some rare/unused/old ones: 瀧 蘢 壟 隴 寵 朧 瓏 籠 聾 龕
 
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