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Need a word or phrase translated?

十六、君らの親兄弟妻子は内地を出るとに、口では死んで帰れと言いますが、心から君が死ぬのを願ってるでせう

でせうか = でしょうか
 
十六、君らの親兄弟妻子は内地を出るとに、口では死んで帰れと言いますが、心から君が死ぬのを願ってるでせう

でせうか = でしょうか
That's one fancy き! I usually change ゐ and せう to more modern forms in my transcripts. Thank you as always, I tell myself one day I'll be at a Majestic level.
I had written something about how 時 seemed to be a good fit but thought 時 looked nothing like the character there so deleted it as I didn't want to seem silly. I guess I should trust my instincts more but honestly would have never guessed that was き。
 
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I usually change ゐ and せう to more modern forms in my transcripts

Yes, I could tell that you already knew what those were, but just for completeness' sake, and for the sake of new learners, and also because I never miss a chance to use the ゐ hiragana, I wanted to pull those elements into the finished version. ;)

Actually, for completeness, it looks like 言ひます (instead of 言います), but no change in meaning. But you may have already picked up on that one as well.
 
Hello everyone,
I'm new to this forum, hope I'm not breaking any rules with this post...
Could anyone please help me figure out what the Kanji in the picture below mean? Thank you!
20230810_222322.jpg
 
Hello, I'd like to get a tattoo with Japanese characters, however I'm not able to determine which ones would suit best: I want to remind myself to have a focused and serene mind as much as possible (because of ADHD) - so I want to write, focus (as a noun) and serenity (of the mind). Could you help to find out the most suitable characters?
 
You'd want your tattoo to be an authentic phrase/idiom - otherwise its going to look cringy and trashy just having some Japanese words inked on you. I mean, its not the 1990s anymore, right? Maybe something like

冷静沈着 (reisei chinchaku)

which incorporates both the idea of calmness and focus. BUT, I am not a native speaker so you would want to have that validated by a native Japanese speaker.
 
You'd want your tattoo to be an authentic phrase/idiom - otherwise its going to look cringy and trashy just having some Japanese words inked on you. I mean, its not the 1990s anymore, right? Maybe something like

冷静沈着 (reisei chinchaku)

which incorporates both the idea of calmness and focus. BUT, I am not a native speaker so you would want to have that validated by a native Japanese speaker.
Thank you very much for the suggestion!
 
Hello everyone.
聞けば、千株で五十枚必要らしい。
Can anyone translate? Especially I don't understand what "枚" means in this context.
 
As you might already know, 枚 is the counter suffix for paper/document, so 50枚 refers to "50 stock certificates" there. And 千株 means that a single stock certificate is 1,000 shares. (千株で五十枚 makes more sense, maybe?)
 
I'll preface my question about dinosaur kemonomimi with some scientifc talk, so you know exactly where I'm coming from. Technically speaking, all dinosaurs would fall under ryuumimi because of their latest classification, with theropods (T. Rex, etc.) falling under hanemimi. How does one say "lizard ears" to further specify to stuff like gecko- or sauropod-based kemono from ryuumimi? Also, please include the roomaji, so I don't have to plug it into an online translator.
 
Is this kemonomimi you're asking about referring to this where sometimes in manga and anime characters will have non-human ears? (I had to look this up.)

So, just answering your question simply without any specific anime/manga knowledge, lizard translates as follows:
LIZARD: トカゲ tokage

Since mimi means 'ear(s)', I would translate 'lizard ears' as TOKAGE-MIMI

I hope that's of help.
 
Looking back it appears I ask a question once a month so here's October's question,
Screenshot 2023-10-23 181825.jpg
What's the middle bit there? Particularly the first character ... or two, if that bottom wiggly bit is a separate from the cut off ち looking character.
 
Hello, I hope this is the right place to ask this, I'm new here. I need some help translating a phrase from English to Japanese. A wildfire made from a mere spark. It doesn't have to be exact, but please as short as it can be while still keeping its meaning, and in English characters so I can say it aloud (I can't speak any Japanese). Thank you in advance.
 
Hello, I hope this is the right place to ask this, I'm new here. I need some help translating a phrase from English to Japanese. A wildfire made from a mere spark. It doesn't have to be exact, but please as short as it can be while still keeping its meaning, and in English characters so I can say it aloud (I can't speak any Japanese). Thank you in advance.
Maybe わずかな火花からの山火事 (wazuka na hibana kara no yamakaji)
 
How about a translation for this? I've looked around but can't find anything other than literal (and obviously wrong) equivalents:

"He/she is the whole package." ...meant to be a very positive compliment.

That the person being described is friendly, pleasant, extremely knowledgeable in what they know, personable, worthy of some admiration (perhaps envy), and so on--possessing the full set of relevant, desirable characteristics.

TIA.
 
How about a translation for this? I've looked around but can't find anything other than literal (and obviously wrong) equivalents:

"He/she is the whole package." ...meant to be a very positive compliment.

That the person being described is friendly, pleasant, extremely knowledgeable in what they know, personable, worthy of some admiration (perhaps envy), and so on--possessing the full set of relevant, desirable characteristics.

TIA.
According to my extensive five minutes of research there's no directly equivalent phrase. This person translates it as 全てを兼ね備えている人 (someone who has it all). Also per this article it used to be common to say 三高 to refer to people who have the three desirable traits ie for men that would be education, income and height. For women that would be education, income and class.
 
Many thanks! Yes, I think 'Someone who has it all' could come close.




Also per this article it used to be common to say 三高 to refer to people who have the three desirable traits ie for men that would be education, income and height. For women that would be education, income and class.
And this part I had to reread a couple times. When my wife and I got married she was tall (still is!), educated (grad degree), and slightly older (30, and even older now, ...but I don't think she'll be reading this!)

For a woman at the time, being tall, educated, and older were supposedly three strikes. (Our 35th anniversary is next month.)
 
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