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Tansu box inscription translation

Luka0101

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Hello!
I have recently purchased a Suzuribako box and it had inscriptions on both drawers. Some parts seem to be worn out but I hope someone will be able to translate at least some parts.

Here are the pictures:

box small.jpg


Drawer 1:

Small drawer.jpg


Drawer 2:

Big drawer.jpg



Thank you very very much, I greatly appreciate it! :)
 

Majestic

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Hello Luka,

It's an address in Tottori Prefecture.

The full address is on the big panel in photo #2. The rest of the photos have the names of people, and repetitions of of the town name.

鳥取懸下因幡國八頭郡池田村大字落折
Tottori prefecture, Shimo Inaba, Yazu county, Ikeda town, Ochiori

平家
Heike - Family name of the owners of the box. Various personal names after this (Kumazō, Kan-something). I can't make them all out.

This location is deep, deep backwoods Japan.

What part of Croatia are you from?
 
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Toritoribe

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鳥取縣下因幡國八頭郡池田村大字落折
Ochiori, Ikeda village, Yazu district, Inaba province, Tottori prefecture
(today's 鳥取県八頭郡若桜町落折 Ochiori, Wakasa town, Yazu district, Tottori prefecture, as Majestic-san provided.)

In this case, 鳥取縣下因幡國 is parsed as 鳥取縣下(とっとりけんか)and 因幡國(いなばのくに), i.e., Inaba province in Tottori prefecture. Tottori prefecture was established by merging Inaba province (eastern Tottori) and 伯耆國 Hōki province (western Tottori).

This is off-topic, but I'm surprised because I've been to the location written there. (To be more precise, I passed through nearby the village when climbing a mountain.) Ochiori is well-known for a fact that the surname of all the families living in the area (20 or so, if my memory is correct) is 平家 Heike. It's said that they are descendants of the Taira clan, who were defeated by the Minamoto clan and escaped to the place over 800 years ago. ("Heike" means "Taira clan".) In fact, Ochiori was formerly written as 落居, meaning "escaping to and living in (the place)".
 

Luka0101

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Thanks a lot for the translation guys!
Very glad to have found out where the box comes from. After you provided the address I went to google maps and took a walk through the streets of Ochiori :D
Also glad to know the name of the family. Too bad there wasn't a date so we would know how old the box is..

@Majestic I'm from Zagreb, the capital of Croatia. Have you ever visited?

@Toritoribe Thanks you also for the short history lesson on the town and the families living there. Very interesting!

Once more thanks for your help! ;)
 
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Toritoribe

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Yazu district was established in 1896, and Ikeda village was merged with Wakasa town to established the new Wakasa town in 1954, so those were written sometime in this period.
 

Majestic

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Hello Luka, yes I visited the Dalmatian coast some years ago. A very lovely country - great memories. (sorry to veer off topic).
 

mdchachi

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Ok I have a very important question for you. Do you call this povitica, orehnjaca or gibanica?

1603722135029.png
 

Luka0101

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@Majestic Glad you liked Dalmatia. :)

@mdchachi
Oh, haha! Didn't expect anyone would ask me about Croatian language! Glad I can return the favor!

I am not familiar with "povitica", never heard the word. Internet tells me it's actually Slovenian pastry which is a neighbor country so probably that's why I haven't heard of it.

"Gibanica" is a pastry that would traditionally be made with cheese.

The pastry from your picture is classic "orehnjača". We use this interesting letter Č, that is pronounced "ch" (so the whole workd is "o-reh-nia-cha")
Orah (or archaic "oreh") means walnut, hence the name. Light part is some kind of sweet bread and the dark part is a mixture made from walnuts. My grandma used to make it, never liked it that much, hahaah...
 

mdchachi

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@Majestic Glad you liked Dalmatia. :)

@mdchachi
Oh, haha! Didn't expect anyone would ask me about Croatian language! Glad I can return the favor!

I am not familiar with "povitica", never heard the word. Internet tells me it's actually Slovenian pastry which is a neighbor country so probably that's why I haven't heard of it.

"Gibanica" is a pastry that would traditionally be made with cheese.

The pastry from your picture is classic "orehnjača". We use this interesting letter Č, that is pronounced "ch" (so the whole workd is "o-reh-nia-cha")
Orah (or archaic "oreh") means walnut, hence the name. Light part is some kind of sweet bread and the dark part is a mixture made from walnuts. My grandma used to make it, never liked it that much, hahaah...
My grandmother used to make it too but she called it gibanica. She was from Kuce which is not very far from Zagreb. Quite close to the Zagreb airport actually. But she left Croatia in 1929. There was also poppy seed version. Walnuts are not mandatory.
I've since learned there is a significant subset of Croatians who call is that too but it seems most call it orehnjaca. (But what would you call it if it was made from poppy seeds and not walnuts?)
 

Luka0101

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Oh cool story.
Yes! There is also poppy seed version. That's called "makovnjača" as the Croatian word for poppy is "mak". They look the same, but poppy version has black filling instead of brown.
In my family gibanica was always made with cheese, but who knows how people called it 100 years ago. It also depends on the region. All these pastries are mostly continental. Coastal Croatians would never use those names. Pastries are complicated :D
 

mdchachi

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Oh cool story.
Yes! There is also poppy seed version. That's called "makovnjača" as the Croatian word for poppy is "mak". They look the same, but poppy version has black filling instead of brown.
In my family gibanica was always made with cheese, but who knows how people called it 100 years ago. It also depends on the region. All these pastries are mostly continental. Coastal Croatians would never use those names. Pastries are complicated :D
Now that you mention it, she made a cheese version of the roll bread too. All of them were gibanica to us.
She also made kifle which was also walnut filled and looked something like this.
1603729877070.png
 
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