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Minor things that can land you in jail in Japan

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Maciamo

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According to this it is illegal to deliver "misaddressed" mail to the proper address. In other words, if you get your neighbors mail in your box, you are not allowed to go give it to them.
Clearly another ridiculous law. What are you supposed to do with it then? Throw it away?
 
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What are you supposed to do with it then?

I know right? I am someone that likes to handle things myself, so these rules that I need to run every little thing through "authorities" frustrates and angers me.

But that's just it. Its yet another example of "go run to the officials". The article says you have to contact the post office and let them handle it.

Seriously, it would never occur to me to do that. Its just not part of my mentality, no matter how many times people insist I leave every last little thing to police, doctors, bureaucrats, security guards, car mechanics, electricians, tow truck operators or whoever. Most of my life experience indicates that contacting these people is a great way to bring trouble on yourself. You would not believe the number and severity of things I had to research and take care of myself. I will probably wind up removing my own appendix one day.

Contact the P.O. over the wrong mail in my slot? Not bloody likely.
 
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EmpJapan

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Can you give me examples are countries that have prison sentences for spitting in public, cutting the line, carrying scissors in one's bag, or "stealing" trash from a bin or a rubbish bag? I am really interested to know if there are other countries than Japan for these things.
Spitting and littering law example: Singapore Laws | Stanfort Academy - Singapore

<quote>
4. Littering
Singapore has strict laws on littering of any kind. First-time offenders face a fine of up to S$1,000. Repeat offenders will be fined up to S$2,000 and subject to Corrective Work Order (CWO). The CWO requires litterbugs to spend a few hours cleaning a public place, for example, picking up litter in a park. They are made to wear bright jackets, and sometimes, the local media are invited to cover the public spectacle.


5. Spitting
To maintain a hygienic environment, spitting in the public compounds is prohibited. The penalty for non-compliance is a fine of up to S$1,000 for a first offence. The fine for a second offence is up to S$2,000 and for the third and subsequent offenses the fine is up to S$5,000.

</quote>

And personally, I would stand with this law of cutting the lines (queues) - It's not just thoughtful but required.
A Japanese would never do - and if in some extraordinary circumstances, they need to do, they will politely let others know the reason, and others will politely support.
 
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A Japanese would never do -
I would testify in court that this is not true.

I have had this happen to me plenty of times, especially at a certain drive through with two converging lanes.

But yes, in stores and in person too. Plenty of times. And I was generally less annoyed with the cutter and more annoyed with the clueless clerks who pay no attention to who is next.....yet keep pestering me for a store card and asking if I want a bag.

I have had people ask though too...and this was refreshing. And I have been the asker, especially at ATMs, cause when I just need cash, I will be out in 30 seconds compared to their 10 minutes of transfers. In fact, some have been nice enough to stop part way and go back to the end of the line with no one asking. Japan deserves credit, but Japan is not perfect.
 

EmpJapan

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Clearly another ridiculous law. What are you supposed to do with it then? Throw it away?
Nope, call the post office and they will come and get it.

It's again well thought of to control things. It's not our job to distribute the letters. There are people dedicated to that.

What if you think that a particular wrongly addressed letter needs to be given to a particular neighbor, and you make a mistake - and some confidential info goes to someone else? One mistake already happened, and permitting such things would only increase the probability of another mistake.

Personally, I have been living here for what seems like an eternity now and the only time I had to face the police was when I had just landed. Around 10:00 pm I went out to receive a call and this call went on for 20 minutes and I was rather speaking loudly. Some neighbor called the police. They came efficiently and told me quite politely to have some sense.

I still thank the unknown neighbor to teach me a lesson.
 

EmpJapan

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I would testify in court that this is not true.

I have had this happen to me plenty of times, especially at a certain drive through with two converging lanes.

But yes, in stores and in person too. Plenty of times. And I was generally less annoyed with the cutter and more annoyed with the clueless clerks who pay no attention to who is next.....yet keep pestering me for a store card and asking if I want a bag.

I have had people ask though too...and this was refreshing. And I have been the asker, especially at ATMs, cause when I just need cash, I will be out in 30 seconds compared to their 10 minutes of transfers. In fact, some have been nice enough to stop part way and go back to the end of the line with no one asking. Japan deserves credit, but Japan is not perfect.
As a principle, I don't go into an argument on the internet :).

However, driving is an entirely different thing. There are no queues where people must wait for their number to come.

But, as far as driving is concerned, I do not rate Japanese drivers in the top position for manners - this is more so for many Japanese with smaller cars. My vote here goes to Germans, after driving on three continents and doing it the most in Germany and Switzerland. Now I am settled in Japan for life (remaining), but yes, you need to be fair.

In stores and ATMs, well, in my close to two decades in Japan (overall), I have never experienced any Japanese jumping the queue.

A very interesting example (not directly relevant - but VERY relevant).

Between 8:00 am to 10:00 am (peak morning hours), get off at Nihombashi station (Tozai-sen), and go for changing to Ginza-sen to go towards Shimbashi station.

A very narrow staircase - with the usual partition to go up or down. Unfortunately, people designed that partition's width according to the horrible evening traffic. However, we can get a peek into the Japanese ways. You will find almost no one coming down in the wide partition. And a huge crowd of people going up in the other narrow partition. Just following the rules.

Well, most of the time, I am the only one breaking that protocol - especially since COVID hit. But, if I really think about it, when one person breaks a protocol, a chain reaction is bound to follow - and the end result is that the rules and protocols get f**ked up.
 
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As a principle, I don't go into an argument on the internet :).

That's....uh....great. Not sure why you needed to say it...but....yeah.

Uh...anyway...they say Japan is small but its not that small. Maybe people here in my area are different. \(ツ)/

Also, your experience vs. mine. But..uh...bombastically stating that an entire nationality doesn't "x" is pretty much never a true statement. You can just take that as helpful advice.
 

mdchachi

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A very narrow staircase - with the usual partition to go up or down. Unfortunately, people designed that partition's width according to the horrible evening traffic. However, we can get a peek into the Japanese ways. You will find almost no one coming down in the wide partition. And a huge crowd of people going up in the other narrow partition. Just following the rules.

Well, most of the time, I am the only one breaking that protocol - especially since COVID hit. But, if I really think about it, when one person breaks a protocol, a chain reaction is bound to follow - and the end result is that the rules and protocols get f**ked up.
Yes, you are really f'ing with the Matrix. Be careful. No telling what could happen!
 

Petaris

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Yes, you are really f'ing with the Matrix. Be careful. No telling what could happen!
Neo: Whoa, deja-vu.
Trinity: What?
Neo: I just saw a gaijin breaking the rules, then I saw another one.
Trinity: Did it just look like the same gaijin or was it the same one?
Neo: F* if I know, all those gaijin look the same to me....

:LOL:
 

EmpJapan

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Neo: Whoa, deja-vu.
Trinity: What?
Neo: I just saw a gaijin breaking the rules, then I saw another one.
Trinity: Did it just look like the same gaijin or was it the same one?
Neo: F* if I know, all those gaijin look the same to me....

:LOL:
You reminded me of my first year in Japan :)

Everyone (especially the girls ... oops women) all looked the same to me).

Then I graduated and thought that there were two molds.

And then reached a stage where I could differentiate between Japanese, Korean and Chinese :)
 
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