What's new

History Japanese history and archaeology: articles, news, and comments

The final instants of Japan's colossal warship, the Yamato, were recorded in an exceptionally uncommon color video shot from American military planes during World War II, as stated by a war-history organization. The video from American archives showcasing the Imperial Japanese Navy's esteemed vessel was made public in Japan on 12 May. A segment of the film reveals the warship enduring an American onslaught on 7 April 1945, near Kagoshima Prefecture, as reported by Toyonokuni Usashijuku, a regional collective dedicated to examining and pinpointing American wartime archival content.


The clip was filmed from a U.S. military plane at around 12:40 p.m., less than two hours before the battleship sank. Another piece of aerial footage shows the Yamato moving off the coast of Iwakuni, Yamaguchi Prefecture, while evading U.S. attacks on March 19 of the same year. The group identified the ship as the Yamato based on its characteristic shape. The scene shown in the footage matches photos attached to a battle report stored in the National Diet Library in Tokyo, the group said. The two pieces of footage, totaling 82 seconds, are part of 17 clips captured across 12 prefectures in Japan between February and August 1945. The running time for all 17 clips is 8 minutes and 28 seconds. Since 2011, the group has been trying to determine dates, times and locations of footage obtained from the U.S. National Archives by cross-referencing them with U.S. military war reports and Japanese records.


The video footage is in the link below.

 
More on the dakoken long sword recently unearthed in Nara (read the news here):

The 2.3-meter long dakо̄ken sword — called that due to its wavy snake-like shape — is by far the longest sword found in East Asia from the Kofun Period (310 to 700) and possibly the world. It is also the oldest among the 90 or so dakо̄ken to have been discovered so far across Japan. In another surprise, the bronze mirror — elaborately decorated with images of gods and animals — is shaped like a shield. Ancient mirrors are typically round; none with such a shape has ever been found.


Photo credit: Otake Tomoko (via JT)


Photo credit: Archaeological Institute of Kashihara, Nara Prefecture


More on the sword and the Tomio Maruyama burial site:

 
In a recent excavation at Kyōhōin (教法院), a sub-temple of Ryūhonji Temple (立本寺) in the Kamigyō Ward of Kyōto, several bones believed to belong to Shima Sakon (島左近), a confidant of Sengoku warlord Ishida Mitsunari, were discovered. Shima, whose bravery in the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 had been praised, was believed to have been killed in battle, but his body was never found. Various theories circulated about his fate after the battle, including the possibility that he survived.


ADKq_Nbp_8rsmNQGooWuJAsTU6lg0AeXUerI3k8oFSN7amd3hZ2S5nff1pZqLJoNwrrDdK9vXFOWLD-rW5uUTFxyqJUXKllrQh9FDZssyXClylHW_7NjQwWaFR--wgvHr3XHzEeCLr1Hv1bipxA1Dx4QUj9RoxpWF73J9MlJ8qx6VYIp_RVN-lJtOONEdub-JFCP-eLBZb6AV4CS3kZkOSLteLmnHU95uNWE4n09iZ7oP14iz9guspfPdRwFaXKd6AH01GUlnMyYqXYGLlCvujx9D60AyU-nQoMHo8XzRXtZKtCon84aGGyENyza7A=s0-d-e1-ft

Photo credit: Sankei Shinbun

Kyōhōin is home to one of approximately five gravesites for Shima across the country. Notably, the Kyōhōin gravestone is the only engraved with the word "burial." Shima's grave plaque and death register remain at this location, indicating that he passed away in 1632—32 years after the Battle of Sekigahara. Priest Miki emphasized that testimonies suggest Shima survived in Kyoto after the battle.

The excavations were conducted during a general restoration of Shima's grave. At a depth of approximately 20 centimetres, a jar containing a skull, a pelvis, and other bones was found. Based on the bone condition, they are believed to belong to an adult over 18 years old. Shima remains a historical mystery due to the scarcity of documents relating to his life. Kyōhōin and other affiliated institutions will continue their research to shed light on the legend of Shima's survival.

Shima Sakon (島左近)

Shima Sakon (島左近)

Shima Sakon (島左近)

Osaka Castle Collection


 
Kyōhōin is home to one of approximately five gravesites for Shima across the country. Notably, the Kyōhōin gravestone is the only engraved with the word "burial." Shima's grave plaque and death register remain at this location, indicating that he passed away in 1632—32 years after the Battle of Sekigahara. Priest Miki emphasized that testimonies suggest Shima survived in Kyoto after the battle.

The excavations were conducted during a general restoration of Shima's grave. At a depth of approximately 20 centimetres, a jar containing a skull, a pelvis, and other bones was found. Based on the bone condition, they are believed to belong to an adult over 18 years old. Shima remains a historical mystery due to the scarcity of documents relating to his life. Kyōhōin and other affiliated institutions will continue their research to shed light on the legend of Shima's survival.
Any theories what was in the jar? are they going to analyze them?
 
Any theories what was in the jar? are they going to analyze them?


戦国武将・石田三成の重臣・島左近のものと伝わる墓の発掘調査が5日、京都市上京区の教法院(きょうぼういん)で行われ、ほぼ全身の骨が見つかった。左近の骨かどうかは不明だが、今後、骨の年代などを調べるという。

It looks like they will take a closer look at the bones found in the jar.

If there are DNA traces left, they could compare them with the DNA of surviving Shima descendants. I guess.
 
Back
Top Bottom