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GENKI I、第3課、第100ページ

Toritoribe

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Oh, I didn't mean for those to go together. みらい (未来) was supposed to be a time indicator. Though when I looked up the kanji of that, I got the impression that this is not that great of a word for this situation (it looks like 未来 is more or less like the opposite of 昔, and the time interval I was thinking of was only the span of a couple days or so).
未来 can't work as a temporal adverb. You need to use 将来 or 未来に for "in the future" instead. The word you are looking for is 近いうちに or そのうち. Also, レモンの水 is usually interpreted as "water with lemon juice".

So, are you saying that the たい form converts を to が? That's my best attempt at understanding what you're saying here, sorry if it's inaccurate. I don't understand at all what you're saying about my first attempt, or rather, what connection it has to my second attempt.
Yes, that's right. As you learned in the lesson 5 in Genki, が works as the object marker for 好きだ/嫌いだ. It's the same also for other adjectives that express feelings/emotions/sense (e.g. 怖い, 憎い, 痛い), the -tai form of verbs, the potential form of verbs (書ける, 話せる, 食べられる) or state verbs (わかる, 要る, できる). You will learn about the -tai form in the lesson 11.

×水が飲む
〇水を飲む
〇水が飲みたい
〇水を飲みたい

×水を飲むのが始める
〇水を飲むのを始める
〇水を飲むのが始めたい
〇水を飲むのを始めたい
(Note that the last three expressions are grammatically correct, but sound a bit awkward since there is a more common expression 飲み始める for "to start drinking".)

Is it because 好き is an adjective, or a property specific to 好き in particular?
It has nothing to do with whether it's an adjective or not. Only "degree adverbs" can be attached to verbs or adjectives that describe feelings/emotions/sense (e.g. 嫌う, 憎む, 暑い) or 高い, 遠い, 深い, etc. since you can't count the number of the object for these verbs/adjectives. The point is that たくさん can be used only for countable objects. If the adverbial form of "many" exists in English, you can't use it for "to like", "to hate", "to be hot" or "to be high", and instead you need to use "degree adverbs" such like "very (much)". Makes sense?
 
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未来 can't work as a temporal adverb. You need to use 将来 or 未来に for "in the future" instead. The word you are looking for is 近いうちに or そのうち.
Ok, thanks.

Also, レモンの水 is usually interpreted as "water with lemon juice".
That's good then, that's more or less what I meant. The only difference is that I also add the pulp.

Yes, that's right. As you learned in the lesson 5 in Genki, が works as the object marker for 好きだ/嫌いだ. It's the same also for other adjectives that express feelings/emotions/sense (e.g. 怖い, 憎い, 痛い), the -tai form of verbs, the potential form of verbs (書ける, 話せる, 食べられる) or state verbs (わかる, 要る, できる). You will learn about the -tai form in the lesson 11.
Thanks for the explanation.

It has nothing to do with whether it's an adjective or not. Only "degree adverbs" can be attached to verbs or adjectives that describe feelings/emotions/sense (e.g. 嫌う, 憎む, 暑い) or 高い, 遠い, 深い, etc. since you can't count the number of the object for these verbs/adjectives. The point is that たくさん can be used only for countable objects. If the adverbial form of "many" exists in English, you can't use it for "to like", "to hate", "to be hot" or "to be high", and instead you need to use "degree adverbs" such like "very (much)". Makes sense?
This is a tough one. As far as English goes, there's "numerously", which is uncommon, but more importantly, I'm not so sure it parallels the adverbial use of たくさん at all. I know I would never say "I numerously have toys", and while "I numerously like other cartoons" sounds a bit unusual, it doesn't really raise any red flags for me. I don't think it's wrong. So this is something entirely new to me, and I don't think my knowledge of English is going to help.

I get the general idea of what you're saying, kind of, but I don't understand the bit about being unable to count the number of objects for 好き. How do you determine that you can or can't count the number of objects based on a verb or adjective alone? I'm used to that being based on a noun. Like, you can count oranges, but you can't count airspace.
 

Kraise

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- About たくさん and すき

In your english example "I numerously like other cartoons" , you are modifying the verb "to like" right?
I'm not a native english speaker but, do you agree that it is kind of an unintelligible concept? what would it mean to "numerously like something"? People would assume that you meant "very much" , as in "I like you very much". This is kind of the same feeling you caused when you wrote the japanese sentence.

What Toritoribe-さん meant is that the way you used たくさん, it is modifying 好き instead of アニメ.
Since 好き means "liking" and therefore, its meaning is not countable, you would have to change your sentence so that たくさん means exactly what you wanted at first, f.e "たくさん(の)アニメ" effectively means "lots of anime"
 

Mike Cash

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while "I numerously like other cartoons" sounds a bit unusual, it doesn't really raise any red flags for me. I don't think it's wrong.

Sounds wrong to me.

"I like numerous other cartoons".
 

Toritoribe

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what would it mean to "numerously like something"? People would assume that you meant "very much" , as in "I like you very much". This is kind of the same feeling you caused when you wrote the japanese sentence.
Yes, that's exactly the way I interpreted the initial Japanese sentence 他のアニメもたくさん好きです。.

How do you determine that you can or can't count the number of objects based on a verb or adjective alone? I'm used to that being based on a noun. Like, you can count oranges
Verbs or adjectives that describe feelings/emotions/sense (e.g. 嫌う, 憎む, 暑い) , as I wrote in my previous post. You can hate an orange/oranges very much(degree), and you can hate many/numerous oranges(adjective, not adverb), but you can't hate an orange/oranges numerously.

you can't count airspace
That's why たくさん can't be attached to 高い, 遠い, 深い, etc..
 

mdchachi

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The point is that たくさん can be used only for countable objects.
One of the examples at alc.co.jp is
あまりたくさん水をやらなくていい植物
Is this incorrect? Or is "water" a countable noun in Japanese?
 

Toritoribe

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Interesting. Yeah, indeed たくさん seems to be able to be used for uncountable objects, e.g., 水 (or related things such like 雨, 雪, 涙), 土, 綿, 勇気, 愛, etc. (I can't find what the key of whether たくさん can be attached to the word or not is). However, since たくさん is not degree, it can't be used as an adverb for verbs or adjectives that describe feelings/emotions/sense even with these words, so 雨がたくさん降る, 水がたくさんある or 愛をたくさんくれる is valid but 雨がたくさん好き, 水がたくさん深い or 愛をたくさん憎む is ungrammatical. Thus, the verb/adjective is the key anyway.
 
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