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News 'You're flying home tonight': Vietnamese student driven from Japan due to poor grades

Davey

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Come on, it says you need N5 before coming but this guy didn't and had 1.5 year to study.

"The government requires students to have at least an N5 level of Japanese language proficiency before coming to study in Japan"

How can you not pass N5 after being here for such a time? Don't really get why this became news and don't feel the school was wrong but maybe I'm missing something.

 

thomas

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Probably a "trainee" at the local agricultural cooperative... :rolleyes:
 
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Studying in Japan without financial support is not a walk in the park.
Students are only allowed to work part-time 28 hours a week, and often times are unable to find anything but the lowest minimum-wage jobs . On the other hand they're obliged to maintain a high attendance rate and grades. It becomes a tough choice between getting not enough sleep, not doing your homework, being late for the first clas in the morning, getting fewer shifts (and hence living on noodles and tofu. Rice is expensive, fish and meat are even more so).

But who said it should be easy? There are always options to ease the financial burden. For starters - consider staying at the dormitory instead of renting an apartment. Most language schools have some type of dormitory to offer. Ask the school management and friends for other lifehacks (there are plenty) Rent an apartment with a classmate. Just don't neglect the academic side of your stay.
I've witnessed it so many times - a young man comes to Japan full of hopes and expectations, then he works himself to exhaustion on night shifts, spends valuable spare time playing video games or drinking (instead of getting proper sleep or studying) skips classes. In the end his Japanese progress stagnates or even degrades. He doesn't save enough money for another term at the school, or simply doesn't qualify due to poor grades or attendance. I keep saying "young man", "he" because girls tend to be more diligent at least that's what i've witnessed so far.

In my personal opinion the hardships that students must overcome in order to fulfill their dream of staying in Japan are justified. It ensures to some degree that those who can make it through will fit in the society. On the other hand I have mixed feelings about those students who want to return to their home countries after graduating - the harshness of student life might scare away such future potential students.
 

Lothor

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Come on, it says you need N5 before coming but this guy didn't and had 1.5 year to study.

"The government requires students to have at least an N5 level of Japanese language proficiency before coming to study in Japan"

How can you not pass N5 after being here for such a time? Don't really get why this became news and don't feel the school was wrong but maybe I'm missing something.

I think this became news because of the way the student was forcibly removed from his apartment and taken to the airport. If anyone has to behave in that way, which may on occasion be necessary, it should be immigration officers, not employees of a language school.
 
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