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Do you like anko?

Do you like anko?

  • I love it!

    Votes: 45 52.3%
  • It's.... ok

    Votes: 20 23.3%
  • I don't like it

    Votes: 3 3.5%
  • I've never tried it

    Votes: 18 20.9%

  • Total voters
    86

Endarion

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I think anpan and taiyaki are a bit expensive... so I sometimes just buy a tub of anko and put it on bread like nutella... or If you're not too lazy, you can make some really great onigiri with anko in the middle! I think that's one of the best! (but I'm really lazy, so it's bread for me.... )
 

ragedaddy

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I would definitely eat some "An Pan" for breakfast over donuts or muffins. That is just a delectable combination, and I will be the first to admit I can not resist. It goes rather well with mochi as well, and like campbells soup Anko is mmm mmm good.
 

Hero

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My sensei had us try something she said was Japanese pancake (I forgot the JP name for it). It wasn't that tasty at first but I quickly got to like them as I was low on money and needed snacks, lol.

(looked like small, round pancake, but 2-3x thick, and had red bean paste in it)
 

Apollo

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nzueda said:
@silverangel - anko is sweet red beans. personally I still prefer them squished rather than whole beans.

@nata_no - Doraemon ate Dorayaki, right? Like in this photo...? My favourite is manju, but I eat dorayaki too -yumm!

Yes...Doraemon ate Dora-yaki..He loves dorayaki and can be bribed with it!! :LOL: I like eating them too, but I don't "adore" it...(too strong a word for me regarding anpan, anko etc...:)
:gohan:
 

isa215

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Just made my first anko today - quite successful (I think anyway! - at least it looks and tastes about right).

Curious to know more about wagashi - the sheer variety confuses the hell out of me! - interested both from a cultural standpoint and, of course, recipes...
 

lexico

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I used to hate sweets as a kid, but "anko" (is that how you call it?) was one exception.
I still hate overly sweet stuff, but "anko" is my constant favorite.
I love all this food talk, guys, but it's making me rather hungry.
Gotta grab a bite of whatever! 🙂
 

wintersweet

Nihon ni itai na...
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Ah, red beans. Red bean paste was hard to escape in Taiwan... If you like it and you can't find it, try a Chinese bakery or grocery store. It comes from China originally, after all (well, probably). I like it in small doses, where the red bean taste doesn't overwhelm things. But I prefer my taiyaki the way you can buy it in Taiwan, with other fillings such as custard, peanut butter, or occasionally chocolate. :) I didn't take the time to see if those alternatives were available in Japan anywhere.
 

okaeri_man

Tadaima!
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at first i didnt really like it, then i loved it, then i bought too much of it and felt sick. eewww, too much... so yeah, it's good in small amounts!
 
Joined
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Please try to eat how is 'MONAKA' and 'YOUKAN'
(sweetened and jellied bean paste).
When you eat a Japanese sweet, please drink bitter green tea
Please try to please eat. 👍
 

lexico

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Hiroyuki Nagashima said:
Please try to eat how is 'MONAKA' and 'YOUKAN'
(sweetened and jellied bean paste).
When you eat a Japanese sweet, please drink bitter green tea
Please try to please eat. 👍
Aaah, monaka and yokang, as we used to call it here in Korea in the 1960's-1970's, are what I grew up on. Yes, the holiday gift packs for children would invariably include those, although monakas were more expensive, hehe.
Thanks for the sweek memories you brought back, Nagashima-san !
I still enjoy the yokangs, nowadays called YON-YANG-GAENG 窶ーツ坂?排テ」ツサ, every now and then. For the childhood memories. I feel very mature by saying that. I need some white hair and grand-children to go with it. Too young for that ! :D
 

Revenant

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There's no poll option for 'I like it'. I don't love it, and I don't think it's just ok. If I have a chance to have some, I quite enjoy it. If it's not there, I don't ever think about it.

Seems to me a far healthier dessert than what we consume in the west.
 

512kb

ええ・・・
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A lot of you have said that you didn't like it at first, but then grew to love it. I thought that was going happen to me, but when I took my first bite, I LOVED IT! (I made it today.) I've been craving it ever since. It's not something that you want to eat a lot of at once, but you sure want to eat it a lot. :)
 

Petenshber

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I first tried sweetened red bean past about a year and a half ago, it was the filling in a steamed bun (i think those are a chinese sweet though, right?).

I loved it from the start and i buy those steamed buns whenever i want a good treat, i also like buying it in cans and using it with american foods.

Someone mentioned using it in onigiri witch i think is a good idea.
 

Hachiro

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When I first read the title of this thread I wasn't thinking about the sweet bean paste at all, I was thinking about this rather grotesque looking fish that really tastes great, especially the "kimo" or liver which is wonderful when steamed.

The white meat of the fish is particularly good in a "nabe" style of cooking, oh yes the name of the fish is also "anko".


So I would have to remove my vote from the bean paste because I really don't like it all that much, but the fish is great.

It is called a monkfish in English.

http://www.produceweb.com/seafood/anko.htm
 

Minty

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I first tried sweetened red bean past about a year and a half ago, it was the filling in a steamed bun (i think those are a chinese sweet though, right?).

I loved it from the start and i buy those steamed buns whenever i want a good treat, i also like buying it in cans and using it with american foods.
Someone mentioned using it in onigiri witch i think is a good idea.

I am pretty sure ツ“Anmanツ” is the same as the Chinese steamed bread with sweet red bean pastes.

It is originally from China.

Singapore? really? where do they sell them?

I haven't tried it yet. How does it taste like?

Like I said before, I am pretty sure it is the same as the Chinese steamed bread with sweet red bean pastes, since you two are in SG it should be very easy to find. In
Mandarin it is called ツ“Dou Sa Bao/窶慊、ツ債ケ窶「テッツ”
p02-1.jpg


I still enjoy the yokangs, nowadays called YON-YANG-GAENG 窶ーツ坂?排テ」ツサ, every now and then.

Yokangs are too sweet for me, I prefer ツ“Mochiツ” or Chinese steamed bread with red bean pastes which apparently is called ツ“Anmanツ” in Japanese.
 

Hachiro

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Yokangs are too sweet for me, I prefer ツ“Mochiツ” or Chinese steamed bread with red bean pastes which apparently is called ツ“Anmanツ” in Japanese.

Is the word "mochi" used in Chinese as well?

In Japanese the bread would be called "Anpan" which has the red bean paste folded in the bread.

"Anman" or "Manju" are also similar, and use the steamed bread like you show in the picture.(and there are numerous varieties here in Japan)

There are also a number of variety of Japanese sweets that use "an" as a major part of the ingredients. The red sweetened beans themselves are also used in what is called "Zenzai" which can be served either hot or cold over shaved iced and often have a piece or two of "mochi" included.
 

firideibi

Kouhai
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Something I haven't had for a while...

Kon ban wa... man, that anko looks really good in the picture... I've been doing without it for a while due to some crazy business that's kept me away from the places which sell them... but I've made a memo to myself to get a few of them the next time I'm in New York City... 👍

Philip David
2006.03.27-28
 

Hachiro

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Kon ban wa...
Konnichi ha.....

The convenience stores here, personally I prefer Lawson, usually sell them at the counter during wintertime. I like the "other" varieties of "__man" that they sell as well, like "curryman" or "pizzaman".

My kids like something that is called "no man ju" which is similar to the "anman" but comes wrapped in a leaf from a plant called "getto", (Pictured below)which gives it an additional unique flavor besides the "an"

Getto-1.jpg
 

Minty

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Is the word "mochi" used in Chinese as well?

Well in Taiwanese dialect it is called ツ“Moi Jiツ”, similar to those in the picture and it is a common desert over there, (my mum is from Taiwan), not sure about HK or China.

As for overseas Chinese who live in Malaysia or SG I don’t think the majority of them know what it is. Except those who are very interested in Japanese food, or those who have Taiwanese connections, like the ones who have studied in Taiwan before, or the ones who have Taiwanese relativesツ…etc.

030718_02-1.jpg


In Japanese the bread would be called "Anpan" which has the red bean paste folded in the bread.
"Anman" or "Manju" are also similar, and use the steamed bread like you show in the picture.(and there are numerous varieties here in Japan)

Yes, we have something very similar in Chinese as well. It is called ツ“窶慊、ツ債ケ窶禿?Dou Sa Binhツ” shown on the picture below.



I just didn’t know Japanese eat these as well, ☝ thanks for the information. It’s interesting to know. :hum:

There are also a number of variety of Japanese sweets that use "an" as a major part of the ingredients. The red sweetened beans themselves are also used in what is called "Zenzai" which can be served either hot or cold over shaved iced and often have a piece or two of "mochi" included.

Chinese also eat shaved ice with red bean paste. It’s called "红窶慊、邃「u/Hong Dou Bing "in Mandarin, Chinese.



In Malaysia and Singapore people eat it too; it’s called "Ice Kachang" over there. But the Japanese version of it probably looks closer to this picture below:



It looks like the two cultures have more similarities than I originally thought.☝
 
Last edited:

Kara_Nari

Angel of Life
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YUMMY! You guys are making me hungry!
My favourite ways to eat anko are: Green Tea and Anko cheesecake... Pat Bing Su (Similar to the photos above, but with icecream, shaved ice and fruit with the read beans), and little things found on roadside stalls shaped like fishies, but kind of like ummm a batter with the read bean paste inside and then cooked in something similar to a waffle iron... but shaped like fishes.
I found the best shop in my area for selling them less than 10cents for one. Best bargain in South Korea!!
 

Kiko_Pitazu

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:D Daisuki dayo! I can't get enough of it. I wish they sold it out here but thanks to Wisconsin and its... Asian-cultur deadness... I have to go online and pray it isn't sold out :( I do however know how to make it myself. 😄
 

Mikawa Ossan

気づいたらカッパだ
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I'm sure you can find anko in Madison if you look hard enough. Otherwise I know for a fact that anko can be obtained in both Minneapolis and Chicago.

You make anko yourself? Wow, I've only done it once, but it sure does take a lot of time and sugar, don't you think?

Edit: Oops. I just realized that I responded to a post made half a year ago.
 
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