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Tokyo Genso: post-apocalyptic Tokyo

thomas

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Tokyo Genso, a Tokyo-based illustrator released a fascinating compendium of artwork that displays a post-apocalyptic Tokyo devoid of humans and taken over by nature. Published in May when the emergency measures were still in place, one couldn't have thought of better timing.

The global pandemic has inspired some artists around the world to work on projects reflecting the anxiety and isolation of life under lockdown in recent months. Others, however, have found inspiration in the tranquillity that descended on the country’s cities when businesses closed and people generally observed the government requests to stay at home. The streets were quiet, the air was clean. Oblivious to human woes, nature went about its business. Here in Tokyo, the cherry blossoms, azaleas and hydrangea went through their regular life cycles one by one, reminding us of nature’s resilience. An artist going by the moniker Tokyo Genso has taken this sentiment to another level, publishing a book of illustrations that show prominent landmarks in the capital in various states of decay that have been reclaimed by nature.


All pictures TOKYO GENSO / Geijutsu Shinbunsha (click to enlarge):

tokyogenso-asakusa.jpg
Asakusa

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National Diet Building

tokyogenso-ginza.jpg
Ginza

tokyogenso-rainbowbridge.jpg
Rainbow Bridge

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Shibuya Scramble / 109

tokyogenso-shinjuku.jpg
Shinjuku

tokyogenso-shinjuku2.jpg
Shinjuku Skyline

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Tokyo Skytree

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Tokyo Metropolitan Gov. Building




Tokyo Genso's Artbook on Amazon (no affiliate link):

Amazon product
 

musicisgood

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Some of that is happening in America. Heck, our downtown area looks like that already. I said a few times I need to take some pictures, by God I should do it. Now our latest news on a bank is that they will only be open from 10 am till noon. The virus is a silent killer of businesses and I don't need no govt. body to tell me that. I wonder if it is a good time to pull out ones money.

Also, if you like to bake, there is a rumor going on about a flour shortage this fall/winter. The very good baking flour here in town is all but sold out.
 

Uncle Frank

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Amazing detail in that art and a lot of thinking about it before doing it I bet.
 

Lothor

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Some of them are great but I don't like the Asakusa and Shinjuku ones. The vegetation in the Asakusa one looks unrealistic, and if Tokyo is deserted, who planted those ordered rice plants in Shinjuku and where did the oxen come from?
 
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thomas

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Some of them are great but I don't like the Asakusa and Shinjuku ones. The vegetation in the Asakusa one looks unrealistic, and if Tokyo is deserted, who planted those ordered rice plants in Shinjuku and where did the oxen come from?

That's a mystery the JT article mentioned, too. The rice paddies hint at the fact that a segment of Tokyo's population might have survived whatever disaster had struck. Obviously, Tokyo Genso takes us back to Yayoi.

Also, what powers the traffic signals in Asakusa? Solar power?
 
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