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Ask Jaybot 指導停止線

指導停止線 (shidō teishisen) are pavement markings used in Japan to indicate the recommended stopping point for vehicles at an intersection or crosswalk. Unlike 停止線 (teishisen), which is a solid line that indicates the legal stopping point for vehicles, 指導停止線 is a broken line that suggests the recommended stopping point for drivers.

Here are some examples of 指導停止線 on Japanese roadways:

1. At an intersection: In many cases, you will see a 指導停止線 painted on the road a few meters before the actual intersection. This is to encourage drivers to stop their vehicles before entering the intersection and to ensure that they have a clear view of oncoming traffic.

2. At a crosswalk: 指導停止線 is often used in conjunction with a crosswalk to indicate where drivers should stop their vehicles to allow pedestrians to cross safely. The 指導停止線 is typically located a few meters before the crosswalk.

3. At a bicycle crossing: In some areas, you may see a 指導停止線 painted on the road before a bicycle crossing. This is to encourage drivers to stop their vehicles and look both ways before proceeding, as bicycles often have the right of way at these crossings.

It's important to note that while 指導停止線 is not a legally binding marking, it is still important for drivers to follow its recommendations in order to ensure the safety of all road users.
 
指導停止線 (shidō teishisen) are pavement markings used in Japan to indicate the recommended stopping point for vehicles at an intersection or crosswalk. Unlike 停止線 (teishisen), which is a solid line that indicates the legal stopping point for vehicles, 指導停止線 is a broken line that suggests the recommended stopping point for drivers.

Here are some examples of 指導停止線 on Japanese roadways:

1. At an intersection: In many cases, you will see a 指導停止線 painted on the road a few meters before the actual intersection. This is to encourage drivers to stop their vehicles before entering the intersection and to ensure that they have a clear view of oncoming traffic.

2. At a crosswalk: 指導停止線 is often used in conjunction with a crosswalk to indicate where drivers should stop their vehicles to allow pedestrians to cross safely. The 指導停止線 is typically located a few meters before the crosswalk.

3. At a bicycle crossing: In some areas, you may see a 指導停止線 painted on the road before a bicycle crossing. This is to encourage drivers to stop their vehicles and look both ways before proceeding, as bicycles often have the right of way at these crossings.

It's important to note that while 指導停止線 is not a legally binding marking, it is still important for drivers to follow its recommendations in order to ensure the safety of all road users.
Could you provide specific example locations using gps coordinates or links to an online map?
 
Could you provide specific example locations using gps coordinates or links to an online map?
Unfortunately, I am not able to provide specific GPS coordinates of 指導停止線 on Japanese roadways as it would require a more extensive search and analysis of various roadways in Japan. However, you can easily find examples of 指導停止線 on Google Maps or other online maps by searching for intersections or crosswalks in Japan.

For example, you can search for "渋谷交差点" (Shibuya Crossing) on Google Maps and zoom in to see the 指導停止線 at the intersection. Another example is the intersection of 宮益坂通り and 坂本通り in Kyoto, where you can also see the 指導停止線 painted on the road.

Keep in mind that 指導停止線 may vary in appearance and placement depending on the location and road conditions, so it's important to always follow the rules of the road and exercise caution when driving or walking.
 
Unfortunately, I am not able to provide specific GPS coordinates of 指導停止線 on Japanese roadways as it would require a more extensive search and analysis of various roadways in Japan. However, you can easily find examples of 指導停止線 on Google Maps or other online maps by searching for intersections or crosswalks in Japan.

For example, you can search for "渋谷交差点" (Shibuya Crossing) on Google Maps and zoom in to see the 指導停止線 at the intersection. Another example is the intersection of 宮益坂通り and 坂本通り in Kyoto, where you can also see the 指導停止線 painted on the road.

Keep in mind that 指導停止線 may vary in appearance and placement depending on the location and road conditions, so it's important to always follow the rules of the road and exercise caution when driving or walking.
Are you sure 宮益坂通り is in Kyoto? It looks like it's in Shibuya.
 
Are you sure 宮益坂通り is in Kyoto? It looks like it's in Shibuya.
I apologize for the confusion in my previous response. You are correct that 宮益坂通り is located in Shibuya, Tokyo, not in Kyoto. I apologize for any confusion this may have caused.

As I mentioned earlier, I am not able to provide specific GPS coordinates of 指導停止線 on Japanese roadways. However, you can easily find examples of 指導停止線 on Google Maps or other online maps by searching for intersections or crosswalks in Japan.

I hope this clarifies any confusion and please let me know if you have any further questions or concerns.
 
I apologize for the confusion in my previous response. You are correct that 宮益坂通り is located in Shibuya, Tokyo, not in Kyoto. I apologize for any confusion this may have caused.

As I mentioned earlier, I am not able to provide specific GPS coordinates of 指導停止線 on Japanese roadways. However, you can easily find examples of 指導停止線 on Google Maps or other online maps by searching for intersections or crosswalks in Japan.

I hope this clarifies any confusion and please let me know if you have any further questions or concerns.
Actually it's not that easy because most intersections and crosswalks in Japan use 停止線 not 指導停止線 but I'll keep looking. Thanks anyway.
 
Actually it's not that easy because most intersections and crosswalks in Japan use 停止線 not 指導停止線 but I'll keep looking. Thanks anyway.
You are correct that 停止線 (teishisen) is more commonly used at intersections and crosswalks in Japan than 指導停止線 (shidō teishisen). However, 指導停止線 is still used in some areas and can be found by searching for specific intersections or crosswalks on Google Maps or other online maps.

In addition, some Japanese cities and prefectures may have their own guidelines and regulations regarding the use of 指導停止線, so it's possible that you may find more examples in certain areas than others.

I apologize for any confusion or inconvenience this may have caused, and please let me know if you have any further questions or concerns.
 
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