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Would anyone correct my sentences, please?

hirashin

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Dear native English speakers,
would you correct my sentences, please?
1 The place I want to visit is Central Park.
2 This is a book my uncle wrote.
3 Is that a house your grandfather built? Yes, it is.
4 There are a lot of places you should see in Kyoto.
5 These are some of the fish I caught today.
6 This is the dictionary Mr. White recommends. (recommend = 推薦する)
7 Is this the umbrella you're looking for?
8 The used bike I bought yesterday is a lemon. (lemon = ポンコツ,欠陥品)
9 The country I want to visit most is Switzerland.
10 This is the house I lived in ten years ago.
11The dress Mary is wearing is very beautiful.
12a These are some of the photos I took in London.
12b These are some photos I took in London.
13 Is that the apartment house your grandfather lives in?
14 The insect I like most is a ladybug.
15a The American woman I teach Japanese is from Seattle.
15b The American woman I teach Japanese to is from Seattle.
16 The movie I saw/watched yesterday was "Pancake".
17 The woman you want to see came here this morning.

Even a little help would be appreciated.

Hirashin
 

Julie.chan

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The used bike I bought yesterday is a lemon. (lemon = ポンコツ,欠陥品)
I don't know if this is valid slang in other dialects, but not in mine. It made me think of a bike that is... well, a lemon (the yellow fruit). I'm pretty sure you mean "defective". If I were to put it in a slangy expression, I would use "a piece of junk" or "garbage".

I'm madly curious, where did you get the idea to use the word "lemon" like this?

Is that the apartment house your grandfather lives in?
That looks disjointed to me. Usually an apartment is not a house, and even if it were a house you wouldn't call it an "apartment house". Just "apartment" is sufficient.

The insect I like most is a ladybug.
That means that there is one particular ladybug which is your favorite individual insect. I don't think that's what you meant. For what you meant, replace "a" with "the". That causes "ladybug" to refer to a class of things as a whole rather than an individual member of said class.

15a The American woman I teach Japanese is from Seattle.
15b The American woman I teach Japanese to is from Seattle.
I'd stick to 15b especially in writing, but strictly speaking I think both are fine.

Everything else looks fine to me.
 

johnnyG

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13 Is that the apartment house your grandfather lives in?
14 The insect I like most is a ladybug.
15a The American woman I teach Japanese is from Seattle.
15b The American woman I teach Japanese to is from Seattle.
13 seems fine to me, no problem with house.

How about:
14) Ladybugs are the insect I like most.

For these:
*15a The American woman I teach Japanese is from Seattle.
15b The American woman I teach Japanese to is from Seattle.

I don't like the (a) version. In UK, you might hear:
The American woman to whom I teach Japanese is from Seattle.
 

hirashin

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Thanks for the help, Julimaruchan and johnnyG. I really appreciate your ongoing help.

I learned the slang word "lemon" long time ago, probably when I was in college. Isn't it used any more? I still can find it in dictionaries. For example,
Lemon - Definition for English-Language Learners from Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
[count] chiefly US, informal : a product that is not made well : a product that does not work the way it should
  • Our new car is a lemon.
14) Ladybugs are the insect I like most.
Oh, can you say that? Doesn't it have any problem when the subject is plural and the complement is single?
How about these?
14b) The ladybug is the insect I like most.
14c) I like ladybugs most of all the insects.
14d) I like the ladybug most of all the insects.
14e) I like ladybugs more/better than any other insect.
14f) I like the ladybug more/better than any other insect.

15b) The American woman I teach Japanese to is from Seattle.
OK, I'll use this one.

In UK, you might hear:
The American woman to whom I teach Japanese is from Seattle.
Really? Do British people use "whom" even in their conversation? I didn't know that.
 

OoTmaster

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I learned the slang word "lemon" long time ago, probably when I was in college. Isn't it used any more? I still can find it in dictionaries. For example,
Lemon - Definition for English-Language Learners from Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
[count] chiefly US, informal : a product that is not made well : a product that does not work the way it should
  • Our new car is a lemon.
It's still currently in use it's a bit of an older term though. I personally haven't heard anyone younger using it but certainly older individuals at least in the US use it in that way.
 

hirashin

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Thanks for the information, OoTmaster. I'd appreciate it if you would check the sentences in another thread.
 

Julie.chan

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Slang changes quite fast. I would recommend not trying to teach the slang of a foreign language; mentioning it is fine, but make sure they understand that it is slang and might not be used by their age group, and certainly don't test them on it. That slang usage of "lemon" is either old enough or regional enough that I didn't even recognize it; I'm 24 years old.

Really? Do British people use "whom" even in their conversation? I didn't know that.
"Whom" is the traditional proper term for when it's the object; it's only recently that U.S. English has dropped this word and replaced its uses with "who". As such, even many U.S. English speakers continue to use "whom", especially if they want to sound smart (though this can backfire really easily if they use it wrongly). "Whom" is also still necessary for that particular construction presented by johnnyG, though it's not a commonly used construction in the U.S. these days.
 

johnnyG

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Lemon usually applies to a poorly made car or other vehicle. The automakers had bad enough quality control problems that there were even lemon laws to protect consumers. Lemon law - Wikipedia
 
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