What's new

Welcome to Japan Reference (JREF) - the community for all Things Japanese.

Join Today! It is fast, simple, and FREE!

Working requirements in Japan?

Nkv

Registered
Joined
10 Jan 2015
Messages
4
Reaction score
2
Hello,
New to the forum here, I was just wanting to find out what is required to be able to work in Japan in terms of qualifications etc... Does it just differ depending on the type of work?

I am not interested in English teaching. I currently am working in childcare but only hold a certificate 3 in children's services, have previously done many fashion related short courses & only completed up to year 10. I guess I'd be interested in working in a cafe, fashion store or as a childcare worker... Is this possible with my current qualification or do I need a bachelor degree?
 

Glenski

Just me
Joined
20 Aug 2003
Messages
4,808
Reaction score
405
Is a bricklayer qualified to do childcare work? Is a dentist? Do you think a truck driver is qualified to do engineering research?

In one sense, you have to think simply and logically about it. Yes, for an employer in most cases you have to have the correct training and experience to qualify for their requirements. EMPLOYER requirements.

In another sense, you have to pass muster for the particular work visa you need for the job. There are quite a few. Some visas allow more than one type of job, which makes it a bit nebulous. However, in the end, you will generally need a bachelor's degree minimum, or 10 years of experience, depending on the job. Those are IMMIGRATION requirements.
Go here: Immigration Procedures Guidebook
Among the many links, click on the one that says List of Necessary Documents, then the first one after that, called Application for certificate of eligibility. In that one you will find a couple of links to tables of information about requirements and supporting documents.
The bottom will have a long link that takes you to this page:
日本法令外国語訳データベースシステム - [法令本文表示] - 出入国管理及び難民認定法第七条第一項第二号の基準を定める省令
Change the menu tab in the top right corner to read 英語 and you will get a list of all the picky details (that immigration provides, anyway, some are nebulous) for visas.

You must meet both types of requirements: employer and immigration. You get hired first, then apply with the employer for your visa. Some employers are clueless about immigration requirements, some are unscrupulous and will try to con you about them, and some are knowledgeable and nice. So, there is no guarantee that even if you are hired, that you will be able to work (get a visa).

Lastly, how's your spoken and written Japanese skills? You're not likely to get a job in any store or childcare office without having high fluency. It's part of your job.
 

Nkv

Registered
Joined
10 Jan 2015
Messages
4
Reaction score
2
Is a bricklayer qualified to do childcare work? Is a dentist? Do you think a truck driver is qualified to do engineering research?

In one sense, you have to think simply and logically about it. Yes, for an employer in most cases you have to have the correct training and experience to qualify for their requirements. EMPLOYER requirements.

In another sense, you have to pass muster for the particular work visa you need for the job. There are quite a few. Some visas allow more than one type of job, which makes it a bit nebulous. However, in the end, you will generally need a bachelor's degree minimum, or 10 years of experience, depending on the job. Those are IMMIGRATION requirements.
Go here: Immigration Procedures Guidebook
Among the many links, click on the one that says List of Necessary Documents, then the first one after that, called Application for certificate of eligibility. In that one you will find a couple of links to tables of information about requirements and supporting documents.
The bottom will have a long link that takes you to this page:
日本法令外国語訳データベースシステム - [法令本文表示] - 出入国管理及び難民認定法第七条第一項第二号の基準を定める省令
Change the menu tab in the top right corner to read 英語 and you will get a list of all the picky details (that immigration provides, anyway, some are nebulous) for visas.

You must meet both types of requirements: employer and immigration. You get hired first, then apply with the employer for your visa. Some employers are clueless about immigration requirements, some are unscrupulous and will try to con you about them, and some are knowledgeable and nice. So, there is no guarantee that even if you are hired, that you will be able to work (get a visa).

Lastly, how's your spoken and written Japanese skills? You're not likely to get a job in any store or childcare office without having high fluency. It's part of your job.
Is a bricklayer qualified to do childcare work? Is a dentist? Do you think a truck driver is qualified to do engineering research?

In one sense, you have to think simply and logically about it. Yes, for an employer in most cases you have to have the correct training and experience to qualify for their requirements. EMPLOYER requirements.

In another sense, you have to pass muster for the particular work visa you need for the job. There are quite a few. Some visas allow more than one type of job, which makes it a bit nebulous. However, in the end, you will generally need a bachelor's degree minimum, or 10 years of experience, depending on the job. Those are IMMIGRATION requirements.
Go here: Immigration Procedures Guidebook
Among the many links, click on the one that says List of Necessary Documents, then the first one after that, called Application for certificate of eligibility. In that one you will find a couple of links to tables of information about requirements and supporting documents.
The bottom will have a long link that takes you to this page:
日本法令外国語訳データベースシステム - [法令本文表示] - 出入国管理及び難民認定法第七条第一項第二号の基準を定める省令
Change the menu tab in the top right corner to read 英語 and you will get a list of all the picky details (that immigration provides, anyway, some are nebulous) for visas.

You must meet both types of requirements: employer and immigration. You get hired first, then apply with the employer for your visa. Some employers are clueless about immigration requirements, some are unscrupulous and will try to con you about them, and some are knowledgeable and nice. So, there is no guarantee that even if you are hired, that you will be able to work (get a visa).

Lastly, how's your spoken and written Japanese skills? You're not likely to get a job in any store or childcare office without having high fluency. It's part of your job.

Thanks for your reply, makes sense. Lots to learn and research to do! I'm only just starting to learn Japanese so still a long way to go. I would love to live in Japan one day. I think I will aim to do my diploma in childcare & focus on my language studies.
Thanks again
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
15 Mar 2002
Messages
16,455
Reaction score
2,255
Thanks for your reply, makes sense. Lots to learn and research to do! I'm only just starting to learn Japanese so still a long way to go. I would love to live in Japan one day. I think I will aim to do my diploma in childcare & focus on my language studies.
Thanks again

You're going to need a university degree. You're also going to need to pass the Japanese professional licensing to work as in childcare...something which will be very hard to do and probably impossible to do before you actually live here. Notice that you have to secure a job offer before you can apply for a visa to come live/work here and you can see the problem that creates.

Employment teaching English to small children is highly more likely, and a background and education in childcare should certainly be an advantage.

At any rate, pursue education that will enable you to work in a field you enjoy and which is also useful whether you end up coming to Japan or not.
 

MisoGood

Kouhai
Joined
19 Sep 2014
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Honestly, I very much doubt that you will find work in child care without high level Japanese AND a degree. It's also badly paid in Japan. Your best bet would be working in a English preschool.
You will need a work visa - if you are from the UK, Ireland, Canada, Australia or New Zealand and under 30, you can get a working holiday visa before you arrive which would allow you to work up to a year. This is not available to US citizens - they must be sponsored by a company offering minimum of a full-time 1 year contract and the applicant must hold a degree for most cases.
If you want to live in Japan come for a vacation and see if you like it first. Without a degree your options are very limited.
 

Glenski

Just me
Joined
20 Aug 2003
Messages
4,808
Reaction score
405
@MisoGood
The poster is Australian (from their profile), but at the extreme edge of being eligible according to their age (29). Besides, as we have already established, even with a working holiday visa, who is going to hire someone that does not speak/read/write the language and care for children? Doesn't sound like they have much experience, either.
 

Nkv

Registered
Joined
10 Jan 2015
Messages
4
Reaction score
2
@MisoGood
The poster is Australian (from their profile), but at the extreme edge of being eligible according to their age (29). Besides, as we have already established, even with a working holiday visa, who is going to hire someone that does not speak/read/write the language and care for children? Doesn't sound like they have much experience, either.
Yes, thanks guys for your input. I was only enquiring about it for the future, not right now. I've just started learning japanese and don't hold a bachelor degree & still unsure of what career to pursue, I have been to japan many times
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
15 Mar 2002
Messages
16,455
Reaction score
2,255
We have a "Learning Japanese" section as well. Please make use of it if we an help you with anything.
 

MisoGood

Kouhai
Joined
19 Sep 2014
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
@MisoGood
The poster is Australian (from their profile), but at the extreme edge of being eligible according to their age (29). Besides, as we have already established, even with a working holiday visa, who is going to hire someone that does not speak/read/write the language and care for children? Doesn't sound like they have much experience, either.

I was thinking along the lines of a native instructor at English preschools/daycare - which I mentioned in my post above - the likes of Kinder Kids, etc. The poster has child care experience and if they have a working holiday visa can be hired on the spot - certainly have the edge on trying to get sponsored outside of Japan. If the poster is under 30 they can easily get a WHV.
 

Glenski

Just me
Joined
20 Aug 2003
Messages
4,808
Reaction score
405
MisoGood,
I will politely disagree with your reasoning. Get a job with a WHV, yes, in many situations. It's not nearly as hard or complicated as getting a work visa job. An Aussie worked one day a week at my son's preschool, and we (wife and I) know of only one other place like that in our city. A day a week is not going to support anyone, if that's what the OP had in mind. I know one of those 2 people, and he speaks extremely limited Japanese (has a spouse visa, which is better than a WHV). If a preschool accepts someone, it will be based on more than just their childcare experience. The school may have to have someone there who can speak enough English to explain policies and the work duties. Entrusting care of children to any worker demands that they know the teacher can handle emergencies, and to do that in Japanese is vital here. Good luck.

Getting a WHV at 29 is probably not as easy as you might think, too.
 

MisoGood

Kouhai
Joined
19 Sep 2014
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Nkv - a WHV has no restrictions on working hours and for Australians its valid up to 18 months. I am certainly not suggesting you will find work in a child care position but very possible as an English instructor at an English preschool or day care where some of your responsibilities would be basic child care. Having child care experience is always a plus where working with young children is involved.
As long as you apply before your 30th birthday for a WHV it should take a few weeks to be issued. If you cant find work at a pre-school, English conversation schools hire all year-round and as you will have a work visa can be hired on the spot. If you want to come to Japan this is your best bet - come before you are 30 or you will need a degree and sponsorship from a company.
 

Glenski

Just me
Joined
20 Aug 2003
Messages
4,808
Reaction score
405
What you tell him is correct in theory as far as being hired. Not all eikaiwas hire year round, and technically he won't be hired "on the spot" because of the bureaucracy inherent in the system. Companies take time to decide things in Japan. Moreover, not all accept WHV holders.

Let's not forget to warn him of the 20% tax on his wages, too, as a WHV holder.

Finally, as I have already suggested, he may have problems in applying for the visa due to his age. We don't know his birthday, for one. For another, although IN THEORY Aussies can hold the WHV for 18 months (a fact that nobody usually confirms outright let alone officially advertises), I don't think he can keep it that long due to his current age. He would do well to confirm what is permitted as far as renewing the WHV if he gets it now but turns 30 before it expires.
 

MisoGood

Kouhai
Joined
19 Sep 2014
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Since Nkv says they are not interested in teaching English I was just pointing out that this is realistically all he/she can expect to find work as, along with some child care throw in for the mix. The info on working holiday visas are easily Googled. If you do not take the opportunity before turning 30 you will need a degree. Plenty of teaching jobs going all-year round in Japan.
 
Top Bottom