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Working in Japan on a Student Visa

31 Dec 2005
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Recently, I've been concidering enrolling on a 12 month Japanese course in Japan (either at a university or private school), but money is one thing that has crossed my mind. Without working there is no way I could afford to live in Japan for a year. Hell, after I've payed the course fees, I could barly afford to live from 2 months, considering rent fees (cheapest I have found so far is \100,500 for a less than desireable studio appartment in Tokyo), food costs, and other expenses.

My question is, would I be aloud to work in Japan on a student visa? If I can't, I might as well forget it...

Thanks
 
for as far as I know... No... but you can always work Illegall... I worked in japan for 1 week on a tourist Visa.... but if it is really not possible I wouldn't risk it...

I hope others can give u better advice...
 
Dutch Baka said:
for as far as I know... No... but you can always work Illegall... I worked in japan for 1 week on a tourist Visa.... but if it is really not possible I wouldn't risk it...
I hope others can give u better advice...

I considered that, how hard are the Japanese authorities on it?
 
It so happens that when I was reading in your other post about Tokyo U, Google ads appear about cheap tokyo accomodation at www.sakura-house.com.

But I am wondering why you need to spend 100,000 yen for renting a studio apartment when you are just studying? I know of Japanese students getting by with 40,000-60,000 yen rental apartments. In my 4th year at U when I was always in the lab, I opted for an apartment of 30,000 yen near my U which didn`t have bathroom, and instead use the shower-rooms on campus.
Ken
 
thepainneverends... said:
I considered that, how hard are the Japanese authorities on it?

I believe that violations of the terms of one's visa can result in being barred from re-entry into Japan for a period of five years.
 
I am reading the latest issue of DIME magazine which I bought in Tokyo during a business trip 2 weeks ago. On page 126, there is some data from the Ministry of Education (Monbusho) regarding the average cost of getting a undergraduate degree (4 years) for a Japanese student who is renting an outside apartment. The costs cover all school fees, exam fees, apartment rental fees, subsistence, etc.

This info may be useful for any foreigner considering studying in Japan. Note the costs below refers to total costs over 4 years.

National Universities such as Tokyo University (Todai), Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokodai), Osaka University, etc.:
Total = 9.42 million yen

Arts and Humanities degree at private U such as Waseda U, Keio U, etc:
Total = 11.92 million yen

Science and Engrg degree at private U:
Total = 12.98 million yen.

If you are planning on enrolling into the top universities, you should be able to do your own sums.
Ken
 
cyberryo said:
It so happens that when I was reading in your other post about Tokyo U, Google ads appear about cheap tokyo accomodation at www.sakura-house.com.
But I am wondering why you need to spend 100,000 yen for renting a studio apartment when you are just studying? I know of Japanese students getting by with 40,000-60,000 yen rental apartments. In my 4th year at U when I was always in the lab, I opted for an apartment of 30,000 yen near my U which didn`t have bathroom, and instead use the shower-rooms on campus.
Ken

You can get away with that little!?
 
mikecash said:
I believe that violations of the terms of one's visa can result in being barred from re-entry into Japan for a period of five years.

As can you in most countries, that doesn't say if it's inforced or not.
 
thepainneverends... said:
You can get away with that little!?
It depends on what is your idea of the least minimum needs in living. If you are willing to accept barebones life, yes, you can.
Also, students are allow to take part-time jobs (international students from Western countries most likely to be teaching English).
You can do a search on this form on student visas and part-time work. There had been many threads on this in the past. Good luck! 🙂
 
thepainneverends... said:
As can you in most countries, that doesn't say if it's inforced or not.

It is enforced in the case of overstays. Whether it would be enforced in the case of working illegally.....you're the one taking that risk so you'll have to assess the odds yourself.
 
after 2 months of attending the school you are allowed to take on a part time job for 4 hours a day, this must be approved by the ward office, witch means that you got to fill in some forms so that they can approve your workplace. No bars or nightclubs are allowed so no point in trying there.
 
epigene said:
It depends on what is your idea of the least minimum needs in living. If you are willing to accept barebones life, yes, you can.
Yes, it was barebones life as I was virtually in the research lab and library from 8am until about 8pm for the 4th year. Home was more for sleeping, catching on TV news, etc. Before that, I was staying in the U foreign dormitory which was pure luxury, about 26,000 yen for large room with common toilets and shower rooms. I also shared a 6-jyou+4.5jyou+kitchen+bathroom+toilet apartment for about 60,000 yen a month with a friend doing his masters for 2 years. Needless to say, we only see each other during weekends as both of us were studying or doing our assignments till late on campus. Maybe, such an apartment would cost about 80,000 yen nowadays but again Japanese prices have not really jumped due to deflation for many years already. It all boils down to what`s acceptable to the person and his/her needs. It is a misconception to assume that the cheapest apartment to stay in costs 100,000 yen a month. :)
Some of my foreign student friends also did part-time writing software, giving tuition for Mandarin, translation, helping out at ethic restaurants, or interpretation, etc. Of course, they do not stay in 100,000 yen apartments too.
By the way, there are foreign student bodies set up by the foreign students themselves in the respective universities and they share info on the more value-for-money accomodations, sharing apartments, etc. For established universities, you may have Japanese people near the universities who are more amenable to renting rooms to foreign students at the university. I have even come across some restaurants nearby that even insisted on only value-for-money menus for students from the university previously. :)
Ken
 
visa info

thepainneverends... said:
Recently, I've been concidering enrolling on a 12 month Japanese course in Japan (either at a university or private school), but money is one thing that has crossed my mind. Without working there is no way I could afford to live in Japan for a year. Hell, after I've payed the course fees, I could barly afford to live from 2 months, considering rent fees (cheapest I have found so far is \100,500 for a less than desireable studio appartment in Tokyo), food costs, and other expenses.
My question is, would I be aloud to work in Japan on a student visa? If I can't, I might as well forget it...
Thanks
The japanese visa system is quite complex and has alot of variations of visa. you actually can work on a "student visa" depending on what type of "student" visa it is. a single "student visa" does not actually exist in japan. there are visas for "reasearcher" "precollege student" "college student" "artist" and the highly general "Specialist in Humanities/International Services" visa which is actually a work visa but you can do study on this visa as well, again depending on the type of school and course etc etc. for a better explanation check the japanese mofa site visa section at
http://www.mofa.go.jp/j_info/visit/visa/04.html#b1c
or visa top page at
VISA
you will need to contact the place that you want to study at and ask them what kind of visa they will ask the government to issue you and whether or not there is any way to get a certain type of visa. for example if your institute will "sponsor" you then you can usually easily get a specialist humanities visa but they have rules to follow as well so they may not be able to help but its worth a shot.
hope this helps!
if it does please click on my site at
- Hokkaido Guide and check one of the google ads for me so i get 2 cents!! i need it!
thanks
hg
 
My question is, would I be aloud to work in Japan on a student visa? If I can't, I might as well forget it...

It is my understanding that one can work 20 hours a week (legally) on a student visa. Many friends and roommates over my younger years did so w/ no problems.
 
Thing is "are you in school now?" I am attending a community college now but in 2 years I will be going to a university that has a overseas study program so loans, grants and scholarships would be a good way to go and you can spend a whole academic year there if you can get enough money. if it is something you seriously want to do I would reserch it carefully so your not suprised when you get there.
 
The rules have changed; it used to be twenty. (Notice that this thread was dead for eight years).

Thx Mike - saved me some time rehashing the negs of working illegally.

@ RAM,
depends on your skills (documentable) such as uni degree (min requirement for working visas) language silty, and frankly speaking on your social skills. Japan is a country of introductions and networking with the "right" people goes a very long way.

Cheers
 
After completing my third year of university, I also want to go to Japan to better understand their culture. At the university, I study the culture of eastern countries, but the culture of Japan strikes me the most. But Tokyo is a very expensive city, you are certainly right here, you need to plan everything well.
 
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