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Word for equal

pugtm

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Sempai is for a senior, and kohai is for a junior, but what is a word that refers to a equal or almost equal?
 

Elizabeth

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There is どうはい (douhai) 同輩 and probably others as well. Since I can't check on anything else at the moment, I hope that makes sense besides being the first thing that came to mind. :)
 

nice gaijin

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age-wise, I use ため (tame). For school, I'd say 同級生 (doukyuusei). 同輩 makes perfect sense, I've just never heard it used before.
 

pugtm

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what about in something like kendo? Or discussing kendo in a forum?
I read if you are taking budo they are different.
 

undrentide

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age-wise, I use ため (tame). For school, I'd say 同級生 (doukyuusei). 同輩 makes perfect sense, I've just never heard it used before.

I agree, 同輩 sounds very formal and is not used in daily conversation.
In business (within a company) also sometimes in college/universities as well, 同期 (douki) can be used.
 

Elizabeth

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I agree, 同輩 sounds very formal and is not used in daily conversation.
In business (within a company) also sometimes in college/universities as well, 同期 (douki) can be used.
Yes, I've also seen 同期 for company associates (同期入社) and I've also seen 同僚 (douryou) used loosely as "colleague" for a same age and same level relationship in business terms. Now that I think about it, 同輩 only in writing.
Thanks undrentide ! :)
 

undrentide

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Yes, I've also seen 同期 for company associates (同期入社) and I've also seen 同僚 (douryou) used loosely as "colleague" for a same age and same level relationship in business terms. Now that I think about it, 同輩 only in writing.
Thanks undrentide !

どういたしまして。 :)
You are right about 同僚, you can use it as far as the colleague in question is not your boss.
 

Elizabeth

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どういたしまして。 :)
You are right about 同僚, you can use it as far as the colleague in question is not your boss.
同僚や後輩は呼び捨てで呼んでいるけれど、上司は役職 名や「さん」付けで呼んでいるんですよね?
I meant more like that relationship above..."Colleague" as closer to friend than senpai or kouhai. 😅
 

epigene

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what about in something like kendo? Or discussing kendo in a forum?
I read if you are taking budo they are different.

In that case, I think "douhai" is acceptable. :)
 

undrentide

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同僚や後輩は呼び捨てで呼んでいるけれど、上司は役職 名や「さん」付けで呼んでいるんですよね?
I meant more like that relationship above..."Colleague" as closer to friend than senpai or kouhai. 😅

職場によって違うと思いますが、私の職場では男性が後 輩・同期を呼ぶときだけは呼び捨てですが、あとは同僚 (同期も含めて)や上司はさん付けで呼んでいます。女 性が呼び捨てすることはほとんどないんじゃないかな・ ・・
(逆に上司を呼ぶときも役職名は使わないようにといわ れているんですよ。これは私の職場が特別なんだと思い ますが。)
 

pugtm

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can we keep it in English i cant read yet...
 

Elizabeth

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職場によって違うと思いますが、私の職場では男性が後 輩・同期を呼ぶときだけは呼び捨てですが、あとは同僚 (同期も含めて)や上司はさん付けで呼んでいます。女 性が呼び捨てすることはほとんどないんじゃないかな・ ・・
(逆に上司を呼ぶときも役職名は使わないようにといわ れているんですよ。これは私の職場が特別なんだと思い ますが。)
I understand the Japanese and assume that women use さん for even their juniors (to other 後輩 women they may use ちゃん?) and men for their 先輩。
I wonder if men may also sometimes attach 君 to lower male colleagues ?)
 

nice gaijin

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Yeah, these terms are mostly used when talking about your colleagues; what's important is how you address them.
 

Elizabeth

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Yeah, these terms are mostly used when talking about your colleagues; what's important is how you address them.
Yes, that's what I was talking about. How they are addressed. I don't especially feel like writing it all out in English for this thread, but since we're already on (off) the subject, if undrentide wants to respond I hope she will understand.
 
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