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What is this person saying?

Yakultcat

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This is from a manga 'ダーリンは外国人' so didn't seem appropriate for the translation forum according to the rules...

The sentence I would like help with (fyi - Saori and Toni are the main characters):
彼のためにもあんまり誘わないでやってください。 Which I totally can't translate. For his (Toni's?) sake - something.
やっ てください - is this please do? Who is she (Saori) talking to? I'm presuming the omitted は(subject) is わたしは so she is telling herself please do this....?
あんまり誘わない - the not invite remainder? Who are they?!?
So I'm sure I'm missing some grammar point or totally mistranslated something, just need some help as my guess is the completely incomprehensible "For the sake of Toni, please do with the remainder of the not invite..." :/

The context of sentence is: Saori and Toni (who is emotionally sensitive) have gone out drinking with an old couple who tell Toni that he has face like a philosopher and the drunk old lady says that next time they should visit a massage parlor (of the sexy kind) together. Saori waits for Toni's response and is worried that he's smiling. Later in bed he asks - why did the lady say 'lets go to a massage parlor' and Saori sits up and thinks 'he's wounded'!! Then her aside is 彼のためにもあんまり誘わないでやってください。

Any help appreciated with what this means.

Thanks!
 

lanthas

 
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"Remainder" is the meaning of the noun form of あんまり. However, as you know, nouns can't modify verbs. In this case, the adverb form is used which means "too much" (or "not too much" with a negative verb).
誘う can mean invite, but in this case uses the second meaning "tempt, seduce".
Hence: あんまり誘わないで... = "... without flirting too much"

"For his sake (and mine: も), please do (= interact with us) without flirting too much (with him)"

On a side note, "wounded" is used for physical injuries. For emotional pain you need to use "hurt".
 

Toritoribe

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~てやってください is a humble expression of request ~てください. This is from ~てやる "to do a favor of doing".
e.g.
妹を助けてやってください
Please do me/her/us a favor of your helping my sister. (= Please help my sister (for the sake of her/me).)

~ないでやってください is the negative version of it; asking not to do.
e.g.
妹を叱らないでやってください
Please do me/her/us a favor of your not scolding my sister. (= Please do not scold my sister (for the sake of her/me).)

@The OP, you seem to be misunderstanding the context to me, especially who said the word and/or who was the one to be talked to. Isn't it possible to upload the scene, including the conversation with the old couple?
 

Yakultcat

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Thank you both for the reply - I have to admit I am now understanding a bit more. My scanner is not working so I've taken photos. This is the whole scene, it's one page - I hope they help clarify - let me know if anything I've not understood properly. I'm very rusty...

So my understanding of the sentence from you both 彼のめにもあんまり誘わないでやってください =
For his sake (presumably Toni), and mine, please do me the favour of not flirting too much. And the the subject is actually going to be something like 皆さんは... or similar? As she is actually asking this favour of the audience (reading the book).

Lanthas - I'm confused about your interpretation of 'hurt' and 'wound'. Definitely you can use 'wound' to mean an emotional hurt... generally a serious one e.g. His callous words wounded her deeply. Where did you hear otherwise?!
 

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Hoge

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てやる usually means doing favor for somebody else (your sister, friend, etc.), so 私を助けてやってください sounds funny to me. てあげる is more respectful to the person receiving favor, e.g. 彼を助けてあげてください
 
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Toritoribe

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~てやってください is used only when the recipient of the favor is one of the speaker's in-group members. That's why I used 妹 as an example, and why this expression acts as a humble expression. In fact, 妹を助けてあげてください is hardly used for "my sister", or rather, "your sister" would be more common interpretation in this case (it should be 妹さん due to the politeness tone of the sentence, though). I believe (私をどうか)助けてやってください works fine, too. It could sound "servile/obsequious", though.

So my understanding of the sentence from you both 彼のめにもあんまり誘わないでやってください =
For his sake (presumably Toni), and mine, please do me the favour of not flirting too much. And the the subject is actually going to be something like 皆さんは... or similar? As she is actually asking this favour of the audience (reading the book).
The person with glasses is actually a man. He is inviting Toni to go to 風俗 together, as you interpreted initially. She is asking the acquaintances/friends not to invite him, rather than readers in general.
 

Mike Cash

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Don't overlook the まあ、単なるからかい
 

Toritoribe

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Yes, she knows it, but Toni is not. That's exactly why he is hurt. (He got the invitation too much serious.)
 
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Lanthas - I'm confused about your interpretation of 'hurt' and 'wound'. Definitely you can use 'wound' to mean an emotional hurt... generally a serious one e.g. His callous words wounded her deeply. Where did you hear otherwise?!
Probably from an American. We do not as a rule use wounded in that way, although in a sentence like that we can certainly understand it. It's a usage I expect to read in a book in full context, so the word hasn't lost that meaning, but I would not expect to hear anyone remark "I'm wounded" or "He's wounded." It's always "I'm hurt" or "He's hurt."

While the usage still exists in books (and the dictionary, of course), it's not generally used in conversation. I would not be surprised if less well-read Americans thought it was simply an error.
 

Hoge

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~てやってください is used only when the recipient of the favor is one of the speaker's in-group members.
I doubt this, though it depends on the definition of in-group mebmers, I would say 誰かさっき質問してたやつに説明してやってくれ. (or, ~てください), even if the guy is a total stranger.
I think it has to be outside the hearer's group but not necessarily in the speaker's group
I agree with what Toritoribe-san writes about ageru.
 
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Toritoribe

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When speaking with someone from an out-group, the out-group must be honored
Uchi-soto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In that example, it's hard to say that the questioner (= さっき質問してたやつ) is an out-group member. The speaker is looking down on him/her in the first place. In fact, the questioner is in the lower position than the people the speaker is talking to (= 誰か) in 誰かさっき質問してたやつに説明してやってください. 誰かあちらに説明して差し上げなさい shows that あちら is an out-group member, and can connote sarcastic nuance.
The same goes to 彼を助けてあげてください. This expression can't be used in a situation, for instance, when your subordinate did a mistake in business and you apologize your superior about it and ask to help him, 彼を助けてやってください should be used since 助けてあげてください shows that you think he is an out-group member.
 

Hoge

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In that example, it's hard to say that the questioner (= さっき質問してたやつ) is an out-group member. The speaker is looking down on him/her in the first place. In fact, the questioner is in the lower position than the people the speaker is talking to (= 誰か) in 誰かさっき質問
.
But it seems to be a matter of definition of in-group or out-group members. Logically, you can look down on any out-group member.
BTW, you say 奥さんを大事にしてやれよ but not 奥さんを大事にしてやってください, so, this is not simply a matter of respect, I think.
 

lanthas

 
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~てやってください is a humble expression of request ~てください. This is from ~てやる "to do a favor of doing".
Right, thanks for correcting me. I feel I should've known this pattern by know...

Lanthas - I'm confused about your interpretation of 'hurt' and 'wound'. Definitely you can use 'wound' to mean an emotional hurt... generally a serious one e.g.
See SomeCallMeChris's reply; I never encountered it in this context before so I assumed (I know, I know) that it was wrong. I stand corrected :)
 

Yakultcat

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See SomeCallMeChris's reply; I never encountered it in this context before so I assumed (I know, I know) that it was wrong. I stand corrected :)

Ha no problem - you were right anyway that 'hurt' was more appropriate in this context :)
 

Yakultcat

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The person with glasses is actually a man. He is inviting Toni to go to 風俗 together, as you interpreted initially. She is asking the acquaintances/friends not to invite him, rather than readers in general.

It's a man....sudden dawning realisation. I did wonder why an old lady would invite him. So she's asking her friend's/acquaintances to do her the favour not to invite Tony (to massage parlours and such).

Useful info/advice about the てやってください, as I'd just thought of as please do. Still a lot to learn!
 

Toritoribe

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But it seems to be a matter of definition of in-group or out-group members.
I'm talking about the grammatical definition provided by the usage of honorifics or やりもらい動詞.

you say 奥さんを大事にしてやれよ but not 奥さんを大事にしてやってください
That's because the relation between you and other person's (= the addressee's) wife can't be closer than the one between you and him or him and her (well, usually... 彼女 would be preferred in that special case instead of 奥さん, though.) Actually, the direction of respect among the three people in the latter example is the same as 妻を大事にしてやってください, isn't it?;)
the level of status
奥さんを大事にしてやれ
the addressee = the speaker = the addressee's wife

×奥さんを大事にしてやってください
the addressee > the speaker = the addressee's wife (illogical)

妻を大事にしてやってください
the addressee > the speaker = the speaker's wife

Useful info/advice about the てやってください, as I'd just thought of as please do.
Right, "Please do for me/him/her" is the basic idea of this expression.:)
 
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