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What is the best elite military force

Which is the best elite military

  • U.S. Army Delta Force

    Votes: 1 5.6%
  • British Royal Army Special Air Service (SAS)

    Votes: 5 27.8%
  • Russian Spetsnaz

    Votes: 3 16.7%
  • U.S. Navy Seals

    Votes: 4 22.2%
  • British Royal Marines Special Boat Service (SBS)

    Votes: 2 11.1%
  • Sayeret Matkal (Israeli Defense Force's special forces)

    Votes: 2 11.1%
  • South African Special Forces Brigade

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • U.S. Army Green Berets

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • German Special Forces Kommando Spezialkräfte (KSK)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • French Foreign Legion

    Votes: 1 5.6%

  • Total voters
    18

Zauriel

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U.S. ARMY Delta Force

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_Force

The 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta (Airborne) 窶?st SFOD-D (A)窶 also known as Delta Force, is a Special Operations Force (SOF) of the United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC). The force's main purpose is counter-terrorism, although the force is extremely versatile.


Background
The Pentagon controls information about Delta Force tightly and publicly refuses to comment on the secretive unit. Initially, the existence of Delta Force was officially denied, even though it was commonly known that the unit took part in Operation Eagle Claw, the failed attempt to rescue American hostages from the U.S. Embassy in Iran in 1979. [1] (http://online.nps.navy.mil/vu_sampl...microsoftpowerpointprojectonebackgroundv2.pdf) [2] (http://www.usmc.mil/history.nsf/0/A192B055F6AC6625852564D70059CA7B?OpenDocument) (PDF documents)

By the 1990s the existence of Delta Force was obvious, as the U.S. military started to officially post messages around their bases regarding Delta Force recruitment, by using their official force name: 1st SFOD-D [3] (http://www.okinawa.usmc.mil/Public Affairs Info/Archive News Pages/2002/020628-recruit.html) [4] (http://www.carson.army.mil/pao/MountaineerArchive/2003 Archive/01-16-03.pdf) [5] (http://huachuca-www.army.mil/USAG/PAO/2003scouts/The Scout 13 Nov 03.pdf) (PDF documents) 窶 although the U.S. military has never released any official fact sheet of the force. [6] (http://www4.army.mil/ocpa/community/makingmovies/) [7] (http://www.army.mil/soldiers/nov95/p51.html)

In 1999, writer Mark Bowden published the book 窶錬lack Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War窶 which chronicles the events that surrounded the October 3, 1993 Battle of Mogadishu. The book, in a short brief, relates Delta Force's involvement in the operations that occurred before the events leading to the battle. The book was later turned into a film by director Ridley Scott in 2001.

[edit]
General information
Delta Force recruits its members from all the branches of the Army, but the force mainly recruits from the U.S. Army Special Forces (Green Berets) and the Rangers. Some believe that Delta recruits from all of the branches of the military, however they are strictly an Army Unit and is considered the Army's equivalent to the US Navy SEALs. Their main compound stands in a remote area of Fort Bragg, North Carolina; housing about 2,500 personnel. Reports of the compound mention numerous shooting facilities (both for close-quarters battle and longer-range sniping), a dive tank, an Olympic size swimming pool, a huge climbing wall, and a mockup of an airliner. It may be associated with the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center.

[edit]
Operating divisions
Delta Force sub-divides into three operating squadrons, each of which comprises small groups known as "troops". Each troop specializes in HALO/HAHO, SCUBA, or other skill groups. They can each further divide into smaller units, as needed to fit mission requirements.

In addition, one of the likely components of Delta Force is the epithetically named "Funny Platoon". Allegedly, it consists only of women, being the only part of the U.S. special operations community that accepts them. It is alleged that the unit's members are intended to be deployed alone rather than in groups, since there are some locales where women would arouse less suspicion than men. For this reason, the tactics of its members are said to emphasize the use of disguises and concealable small arms. It is not known whether any members of the "Funny Platoon" have been involved in Delta Force operations to date.

[edit]
Delta Force in modern conflicts
One of several operations in which Delta Force operators played important roles was the invasion of Iraq in 2003. [8] (http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usawc/Parameters/03autumn/noonan.pdf) (PDF document) They allegedly entered Baghdad in advance, along with SEALs from DEVGRU, building networks of informants while eavesdropping on and sabotaging Iraqi communication lines.

In addition, the force was involved in the offensive against the Taliban in Afghanistan in 2002. [9] (http://www.hq.usace.army.mil/cepa/pubs/sep03/story13.htm) In particular, many observers strongly suspect that members of Delta Force made up one of two units involved in a raid on a residence belonging to Mullah Omar. According to The Pentagon, the level of resistance to that operation was minimal.

The Mullah was not present, but some papers and computer disks were said to have been seized in the raid. Critics later alleged that the second unit was unnecessary, claiming that it was very large and uncoordinated. As a result, they say, the defenders were alerted early and the number of friendly casualties was in fact higher than reported.

[edit]
Operations
Operation Eagle Claw - Iran, 1980
Operation Urgent Fury - Grenada, 1983
Operation Just Cause - Panama, 1989
Operation Desert Shield - Iraq, 1990
Operation Desert Storm - Iraq, 1991
Operation Restore Hope - Somalia, 1993
Operation Gothic Serpent - the operation that led to the Battle of Mogadishu
Operation Enduring Freedom - Afghanistan, 2001
Operation Iraqi Freedom - Iraq, 2003

Famous Delta Force operators
General Peter J. Schoomaker [10] (http://www.army.mil/leaders/csa/default.htm) [11] (http://www.dod.mil/news/Jun2003/n06172003_200306172.html) [12] (http://www.mccoy.army.mil/ReadingRoom/Triad/06272003/Army Chief of Staff.htm)
35th Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army. Commander of 1st SFOD-D from 1989-1992.
Command Sergeant Major Eusebius P. Cadet [13] (http://www.usagj.jp.pac.army.mil/csm.htm)
Command Sergeant Major, Camp Zama Garrison, Japan U.S. Army Garrison Japan.
Major Richard Meadows
Key role in establishing Delta Force. [14] (http://www.army.mil/soldiers/nov95/p51.html)
Colonel Charles Beckwith
Selected by President Jimmy Carter to organize and form a highly specialized counter-terrorism unit, known today as Delta Force. [15] (http://www.campbell.army.mil/1bde/distinguished_members_of_the_reg.htm)
Master Sergeant Gary Gordon
Medal of Honor, KIA in the Battle of Mogadishu. A U.S. Navy warship honors his name.
Sergeant First Class Randall Shughart
Medal of Honor, KIA in the Battle of Mogadishu. A U.S. Navy warship honors his name.



British Royal Army Special Air Service (SAS)

http://home.hccnet.nl/22.sas/

http://www.specwarnet.com/europe/sas.htm

http://britishsas.8m.com/

http://britishsas.8m.com/training.html

The SAS selection is one of the hardest, and most grueling in the world. It consists of three basic phases. The first phase, Fitness and navigation, being the hardest, with the largest drop out. The second phase, Jungle Training in Brunei, and finally combat survival, including escape tactics and interrogation.



Phase I
Endurance Phase:
The selection course begins with a week long BFT, (Battle Fitness Course), 3 mile run, the first mile and a half must be completed in 12 and a half minutes, the rest in your own time. The next 5-6 days consist of basic map revision, orienteering, gym work and 5 mile runs. 8 Mile cross country runs are also done, with candidates required to finish in 1 hour. At the end of the first week the candidates face their first real test: The Fan dance



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The Fan Dance
The fan dance consists of: carrying a 32 Pound bergen over a route of 24km. Easy?well think about this then:
Your day starts at 4am, and ends at 10.30pm, and marches range from 15-64km, which means going up, and then all the way down, and then all the way up again and so on, carrying bergens weighing 40-60 pounds! This also includes a few night marches.

To add to the problem, you are never told when the cut off time is and just have to keep up with the DS, or get RTU'd, (return to unit). However, if a candidate who has been doing well suddenly has a bad day, he may receive a 'gypsy's warning', one more bad day and they are told to report to platform 4, basically you've been RTU'd. Still think this is easy?



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Test Week
This is what all the hard work leads to: a series of 24-64km marches, all over the Brecon Beacons, followed by the hand drawn map march, and finally the endurance march, which takes twenty hours to complete!
After this the candidates are gathered together and told if they have passed this phase or not.

The survivors are then sent for continuation training, where they are trained on the Special Air Service weapons, as well as eastern block weapons. The physical hasn't ended with test week as they are expected to keep fit and do gym work, and are tested for their mental abilities, language aptitude as well as mensa tests. this is all done to see if a candidate can adjust to the SAS way of doing things.

http://britishsas.8m.com/training2.html

Once selection is completed the training does not stop there. The soldiers are then sent to their respective troops, Montain troop, Mobility troop or Boat troop, this is is simply done by which ever troop has openings. They then under go Special training which includes, Parachuting, (all SAS soldiers have to do this), medical training, advanced weapons training etc...

HALO, (High Altitude, Low Opening) parachuting is the main technique taught. Over six weeks they will jump about 40 times over Britain and France, from about 12000 Feet, advancing up to 25000 feet. Sounds simple enough? Well try this then, during the first 12 seconds of the jump you will drop 1480 Feet, reaching terminal velocity of 120mph!

As Peter Radcliffe explains in his book, "Eye of the storm" it is extremely difficult to remain in the Starfish shape, thus being stable enough to deploy your parachute. Imagine driving your car at 120mph, (192Kmh), and putting your hand out your window! Now imagine the effect that has on your whole body, where even the slightest movement will throw your body all over the place!



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Boat Troop do a lot of night navigation 25 miles out to sea, on rubber Gemini's. This to sounds easy enough, but spending up to 5 or 6 hours a night in the freezing sea water is definitely not my idea of fun! It is however essential that the SAS are able to operate in any area, climate and situation, whether it is in the dessert or the freezing ocean.

And so this is why boat troop spend hours upon hours training in night navigation at sea, diving, underwater explosives, possible the most dangerous for of explosives, medical care, insertions into hostile territory from sea, the list goes on..



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Then of course there is Medical training at hospitals in and around Britain. It is essential that every soldier knows medical procedures, for obvious reasons. The SAS spend a month in a ER, learning and practicing the necessary skills, like gunshot wounds, burns etc..

They will also get the opportunity to spend about a week in a morgue, doing post-mortom examination and examinations of the human body. The other obvious skill that the SAS require, is to hostage rescue.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Air_Service

The 22 Special Air Service regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces organisation of the British Army. They are seen by many as the best special forces unit in the world. Formed in 1941 to conduct raids behind German lines in North Africa, it today serves as a model for similar units fielded by many other countries. At present, there are three separate battalion-sized regiments within the SAS, along with two attached squadrons of the Royal Corps of Signals and a flight of the Army Air Corps which support the SAS and consist of a mixture of SAS and non-SAS trained personnel:

22 SAS, 264 (SAS) Signal Squadron and 8 Flight AAC are units of the Regular Army.
21 SAS, 23 SAS and 63 (SAS) Signal Squadron are units of the Territorial Army.


The main responsibilities of the SAS are believed to be:

To conduct military operations in denied areas (e.g. raids and intelligence gathering behind enemy lines).
To conduct military counter-terrorist operations within the UK (including hostage rescue).
They also provide VIP protection on certain occasions (such as when a British Prime Minister visits a warzone), and sometimes work in a training or support role for allied militaries.
World War Two
The SAS was founded by then Lieutenant David Stirling during World War II. It was originally created to conduct raids and sabotage far behind enemy lines in the desert, and operated in conjunction with the existing Long Range Desert Group. Stirling (formerly of No.8 Commando) looked for recruits with rugged individualism and initiative and recruited specialists from Layforce and other units. The name "Special Air Service" was already in use as a deception.

Their first mission, parachuting behind enemy lines in support of General Sir Claude Auchinleck's attack in November 1941, was a disaster. Only 22 out of 62 troopers reached the rendezvous. Stirling still managed to organise another attack against the German airfields at Aqedabia, Site and Agheila, this time transported by the LRDG. They destroyed 61 enemy aircraft without a single casualty. 1st SAS earned regimental status and Stirling's brother Bill began to organise a second regiment, 2 SAS.

During the desert war the SAS performed many successful and daring long range insertion missions and destroyed aircraft and fuel depots. Their success contributed towards Hitler issuing his Kommandobefehl order to execute all captured Commandos. When the Germans stepped up security, the SAS switched to hit-and-run tactics. They used jeeps armed with Vickers K machine guns and used tracer ammunition to ignite fuel and aircraft. They took part in Operation Torch.

David Stirling was captured by the Italians in January 1943 and he spent the rest of the war as a prisoner of war in Colditz castle. His brother Bill Stirling and 'Paddy' Blair Mayne took command of the SAS.

The SAS were used in the invasion of Italy. At the toe of Italy they took the first prisoners of the campaign before heading deeper into Italy. At one point four groups were active deep behind enemy lines laying waste to airfields, attacking convoys and derailing trains. Towards the end of the campaign Italian guerrillas and escaped Russian prisoners were enlisted into an "Allied SAS Battalion" which struck at Kesselring's main lines of communications. In 1945 Major Farran made one of the most effective raids of the war. His force raided the German Fifth Corps headquarters burning the buildings to the ground and killing the General and some of his staff.

Prior to the Normandy Invasion, SAS men were inserted into France as 4-man teams to help maquisards of the French Resistance. In a reversal of their by now customary tactics, they often travelled during the day, when Allied fighter bombers drove enemy traffic off the roads and then ambushed enemy troops moving in convoy under the cover of darkness. In Operation Houndsmith, 144 SAS men parachuted with jeeps and supplies into Dijon, France. During and after D-Day they continued their raids against fuel depots, communications centres and railways. They did suffer casualties窶蚤t one stage the Germans executed 24 SAS soldiers and a US Army Air Force pilot. At the end of the war, the SAS hunted down SS and Gestapo officers. By that time the SAS had been expanded to five regiments, including two French and one Belgian.

[edit]
Post-war: 1940s to 1970s
After the war, the British War Office did not entirely disband the SAS regiments, but the French and Belgians returned to their own countries. The British SAS was no longer a regular army unit but Territorial Army Unit 21 SAS Regiment still existed. However, in April 1948, the Malay Races Liberation Army began an insurrection which transformed into the Malayan Emergency. Two years later Brigadier Mike Calvert practically re-created the SAS as a commando unit reminiscent of jungle troops like Chindits. Territorial Unit 21 SAS was redeployed from the Korean War and sent to Malaya. Many other members were recruited from the original SAS, other units, Rhodesia, and even army prisons. The intended unit name "Malay Scouts" was scrapped for the reborn SAS.

Training new recruits took time. They learned tracking skills from Iban soldiers from Borneo. They began to patrol in teams of 2 or 4 men. Less than sanitary conditions forced them to learn first aid. They also learned local languages and respect for the local customs and culture. Patrol periods in the jungle were progressively extended to three months. Soldiers unsuitable for jungle warfare were RTUed (Returned to Unit). At that stage some troopers were armed with pump-action shotguns. They also earned the respect of some of the indigenes by helping them. By the end of 1955 there were 5 SAS squadrons in Malaya. They stayed in mopping up operations until the end of 1958.

Strings of other missions followed. The SAS fought anti-sultan rebels in Jebel Akhdar, Oman in 1958-1959. They fought Indonesian-supported "guerillas" during the Indonesian Confrontation in Borneo, Brunei and Sarawak in 1963-1966. They also tried to pacify the situation in Aden in 1964-1967 before the withdrawal of British troops. They fought against another insurrection in Dhofar, Oman in 1970-1977.

Most of these deployments were clandestine. Membership, missions, and the whole existence of SAS became a secret. The Regiment's role was expanded to bodyguard training, counterinsurgency and counter-terrorism. They also began to work in civilian clothes on missions unless they could use uniforms of some other unit as a ruse. The British Secretary of State for Defence still does not discuss the SAS or its operations.

[edit]
Counter-terrorism
The Regiment's counter-terrorism role began in the 1950s, indeed they were reformed for deployment in the Malayan Emergency against the mainly ethnic Chinese MPABA (Malayan Peoples Anti British Army) led by Chin Peng. However the regular SAS did not obtain special financing to develop this capability until the 1970s.

In Northern Ireland the SAS was involved from the early days in what became known as 窶狼he Troubles窶 which started in 1969. Indeed in the early days of The Troubles they operated openly in uniform wearing the SAS sand coloured beret with the SAS cloth winged dagger cap badge. They were involved in several incidents in which unarmed IRA members (including a woman) were killed. The most notable of these were at Loughgall and Gibraltar. As supposedly the British army was in Northern Ireland to provide support for the Royal Ulster Constabulary, these killings generated some controversy. In 1977, Captain Robert Nairac, an undercover SAS officer, was abducted and beaten to death in Armagh by a low-level IRA operative and his friends who had begun to suspect him after overhearing him in a bar.

In the Northern Ireland Troubles the SAS were given priority in the intelligence pecking order and supplied the most credible or 窶鷲ard窶 intelligence. This gave the SAS the all too rare opportunity in a CRO (Counter Revolutionary Operations) campaign to act proactively and aggressively by laying ambushes and placing COPs (Covert Observation Posts). SAS actions were almost always directed against the IRA, with some against the smaller INLA. Many SAS men, although forbidden to follow suspects into the Republic of Ireland, had no compunction about doing so. Some were caught and arrested by Irish police. Controversially, they were never charged with firearms offences, but returned to the British authorities.

Lesser quality intelligence was supplied to infantry COP teams (Covert Observation Post) who because of the tenuous quality of this intelligence were unlikely to get a contact (armed encounter) with the Players (British forces colloquialism for Terrorists), even though these COP teams operated in very similar ways to SAS teams. It was common for SAS trained soldiers to serve with 14 Intelligence Company (known colloquially as 14 Int or often simply as The Det because its members were volunteers who were detached from other units). A specialist unit set up specifically for Northern Ireland, 14 Int is an all arms unit. That means they recruit from all branches of the armed services, including women. They served in The Province in an intelligence gathering role, mainly operating in plain clothes. 14 Int liased closely with the RUC (Royal Ulster Constabulary) Special Branch and other SF (Security Force) formations.

22 SAS's reputation, or rather mystique, grew to the extent that during the Balcombe Street siege, the IRA surrendered once the SAS deployment was publicised. The regiment were brought sharply to the public's attention during the Iranian embassy siege in London on April 30, 1980. The live televising of Operation Nimrod brought the SAS much publicity.

[edit]
Military operations from the 1980s onwards
During the Falklands War 1982, SAS teams worked, with their Special Boat Service counterparts, in many operations before the main force landings at San Carlos and after the landings ahead of the FEBA (Forward Edge of Battle Area- the front line). These included operations in South Georgia, guiding Harrier attacks on Port Stanley airport to destroy Argentine helicopters, and the destruction of 11 Pucarテ。 attack aircraft on Pebble Island. During the war the 22 SAS under the commmand of Lt Col Mike Rose were the only land formation that had their own satellite communications back to the UK.

In the Gulf War, the SAS's role was similar to their forerunners in World War Two: they deployed deep into Iraqi territory to gather intelligence and destroy mobile Scud missile launchers. They did the job with anything from explosives to jackhammers.

The most famous mission of the war, known as Bravo Two Zero, was popularised by books written by two participants in the mission. Their accounts describe an 8 man SAS patrol cut off deep in Iraq during a scud-busting raid. Discovered by the Iraqis they supposedly fought their way to the border over the distance of 120 miles, killing 250 Iraqi soldiers along the way. 4 were eventually captured having run out of ammunition, 3 were killed in action and one managed to escape to Syria. These accounts have received severe criticism from a former member of the SAS [1] (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0304365548/026-5416790-7473204).

Allegedly some troopers (officially ex-members of the Regiment) fought in the Vietnam War and helped Mujahedeen in Afghanistan during the Soviet invasion. There was also official SAS training of Mujahadeen in Scotland in the 1980s, with particular emphasis on shooting down Russian helicopters. Some ex-members have also become mercenaries.

They were also involved in the War on Terrorism in Afghanistan. When Taliban and Al-Qaida prisoners tried to escape in Afghanistan, the SAS was reputedly called in. They also rescued two CIA men who were trapped behind enemy lines. Operation Trent employed half the Regiment in a successful attack on a $85million opium storage plant in Helmand province, which doubled as an Al-Qaida local command centre.

[edit]
Home base and selection
The SAS has been based at Hereford in the west of England for many years. Stirling Lines, named after David Stirling, was initially the home of the Regiment but in 1999 they moved to a former RAF base at Credenhill on the outskirts of Hereford.

Commanding officer John Woodhouse introduced SAS Selection in 1952. Before that, troopers had earned their credentials in the field.

SAS Selection is the most demanding military training course in the British Army and is also said to be the most demanding in the world: it reputedly has only a 5% pass rate. It is a six month test of strength, endurance, and resolve over the Brecon Beacons and Elan Valley in Wales, and in the jungle of Brunei. The Namib Desert is also used as a desert training ground. The training includes tests of interrogation resistance. A candidate who fails the selection is "RTUed" (i.e. "returned to [his former] unit"). Candidates are allowed only two attempts at passing. Regular candidates must have been a serviceman (women are not accepted) in the Army or RAF Regiment for a minimum of three years, but candidates for the Territorial Army SAS can apply directly without currently being members of the TA.

After passing Selection, soldiers enter one of the squadrons. Here they are assigned to a troop. Troops have different roles (for example, Boat, Air, Mountain and Mobility), each with special skills in their respective areas. Troopers lose their previous rank when they join the Regiment (although officers, who must hold a minimum rank of captain, do not) and have to work their way up again from the lowest rank, but revert to their original rank (with appropriate promotions for length of service) if they ever leave the SAS. They are on probation for four years before they are fully accepted, trusted and trained in the SAS. Specialist training includes:

First aid, to a fairly high level, with stints in busy hospitals, including a week in a mortuary;
Signals;
HALO (High Altitude Low Opening), a type of parachuting insertion technique;
Sniping - all SAS snipers are trained by the Royal Marines at the Sniper course at CTCRM (Commando Training Centre Royal Marines);
Languages;
Vehicle operating skills.
Like other sections of the British armed forces, the SAS accepts members from the Commonwealth, with notable representation from Fiji, the former Rhodesia, New Zealand and Australia.

[edit]
The SAS in Popular Culture
The SAS has since the mid-1970s built up an almost mythical reputation.

It is the prime ingredient for a regular fare of heroic exploits of almost superhuman dimensions in the British tabloid press. This press obsession increased enormously following the dramatic 1980 hostage rescue at the Iranian Embassy siege in London, which was seen live on television.

The enigma, misinformation and myth surrounding the SAS has been exacerbated by government secrecy in all matters related to the Regiment aided by a good deal of government propaganda relating to the SAS, much released in behind the scenes press briefings resulting in press speculation about the Regiment's deployments.

The SAS was greatly popularised among young people all over the world in the extremely popular online game Counter-Strike. The SAS were added as part of the Counter-Terrorism units a player could chose to play as during the game's development.

Adding to all this there is a constant stream of fictional depictions of the SAS Regiment and of former SAS soldiers.

Blurring the line between fiction and fact are a number of supposedly factual accounts which, some allege, are in reality highly dramatised accounts based very loosely on actual events. Perhaps the two most well known examples being two books written under pseudonyms by two ex-SAS soldiers who served together on a patrol into Iraq in the first Gulf war of 1991:

Bravo Two Zero by Andy McNab
The One That Got Away by Chris Ryan
Both of these works have subsequently been criticised by authoritative sources (including the Regimental Sergeant Major of 22 SAS at the time of the first Gulf war, Peter Ratcliffe DCM) as being highly embellished dramatisations of actual events with only a tenuous relation to reality.

Despite the alleged embellishments, these books sold very well and consequently started a me-too publishing bonanza by ex SAS soldiers cashing in on this clear public appetite. The British government has since moved to prevent this in future by insisting that all who serve with the Regiment sign an agreement not to publish details of their service with the Regiment.

As a result of the plethora of exaggeration, myth and plain falsehood put out as fact in relation to the British SAS and its methods of operation, anything written about the SAS should perhaps be treated with a very healthy dose of skepticism.

There is even the surprisingly common phenomenon of individuals attempting to bask in the reflected glory of the SAS by claiming to have served with the Regiment, when in reality they have had little or even no connection whatsoever with the SAS. This 'wannabe' phenomenon also occurs in relation to other special force units, both British and foreign.

This is all perhaps indicative of aspects of the human condition and psychology and tells us something about the birth of myth and legend.

In 2002 and 2003, BBC Television further exploited the success of the SAS with a series of programmes which showcased ordinary members of the public being subjected to training routines and survival exercises normally undergone by prospective members of the organisation for selection purposes, as well as a documentary featuring former SAS members explaining general combat and survival tactics.

Some written books about the SAS include:

The Phantom Major by Virginia Cowles (out of print) reconstructs the formation and early years of the SAS from accounts by Stirling and other members of the unit, written in the 1950s.
SAS: Borneo Story by James Albany (now out of print) semi official account of the SAS in the 1960s conflict with Indonesia
Eye of the Storm by Peter Ratcliffe DCM, who served with the Regiment for 25 years and became its Regimental Sergeant Major
SAS Operation Oman by Colonel Tony Jeapes, former SAS Commanding Officer during the Oman campaign of the early to mid 1970s
Who Dares Wins (The Special Air Service-1950 to the Gulf War) by Tony Geraghty, who has written much about the history of the SAS and its operations clearly with the help of current and ex-SAS members.
Where Soldiers Fear To Tread by Ranulph Fiennes (out of print) 1975. ISDN 0340147547 A fascinating and often deeply moving personal account of the author's experiences on active service with the SAS in Oman in the late '60s and early '70s.
He Who Dares (apa Soldier I SAS) by Michael Paul Kennedy (out of print) Autobiographical account of service in the SAS, including accounts of the battle of Mirbat and the author's role in the storming of the Iranian Embassy in London.


U.S. Navy Seals

http://www.navyseals.com/community/main.cfm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Navy_SEALs

Force fact file
The U.S. Navy SEALs are considered to be, according to "Encyclopedia of the Navy SEALS", the world's premier Special Operations and Counter-Terrorism Force. Though technically specializing in maritime insertion, the SEALs are inserted by Sea Air or Land, hence the acronym. From the jungles of Vietnam, to the shores of Panama, or to the sands of Iraq, SEALs have proven to be the most fearsome and effective Special Operations/Counter-Terrorist Unit in the world.

Historically, they can trace their history to the first group of volunteers selected from the Naval Construction Battalions (Seabees) in the spring of 1943. These volunteers were organized into special teams called 窶朗avy Combat Demolition Units窶 (NCDUs). The units were tasked with reconnoitering and clearing beach obstacles for troops going ashore during amphibious landings, and evolved into Combat Swimmer Reconnaissance Units.

The NCDUs distinguished themselves during World War II in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters. In 1947, the Navy organized its first underwater offensive strike units. During the Korean Conflict, these Underwater Demolition Teams (UDTs) took part in the landing at Inchon as well as other missions including demolition raids on bridges and tunnels accessible from the water. They also conducted limited minesweeping operations in harbors and rivers.

During the 1960s, each branch of the armed forces formed its own counterinsurgency force. The Navy utilized UDT personnel to form separate units called SEAL teams. January of 1962 marked the commissioning of SEAL Team ONE in the Pacific Fleet and SEAL Team TWO in the Atlantic Fleet. These teams were developed to conduct unconventional warfare, counter-guerrilla warfare and clandestine operations in both blue water and brown water environments.

Those qualifying to become Navy SEALS are authorized to wear and display the Special Warfare Badge, also known as the SEAL Trident. This badge, commonly called the "trident" or "Budweiser" (for its resemblance to the Budweiser Eagle), serves as the insignia for the SEALs as a whole and is the largest and most recognizable warfare pin in the United States Navy.


SEAL jumps over the side from boat.Concurrently, Naval Operations Support Groups were formed to aid UDTs, SEALs, and two other unique units 窶韮oat Support and Beach Jumpers窶 in administration, planning, research, and development. During the Vietnam War, UDTs performed reconnaissance missions and SEALs carried out numerous offensive operations.

In 1967, the Naval Operations Support Groups were renamed 窶朗aval Special Warfare Groups窶 (NSWGs) as involvement increased in special operations.

In 1983, existing UDTs were re-designated as 窶牢EAL teams窶 or 窶牢EAL Delivery Vehicle Teams窶 and the requirement for hydrographic reconnaissance and underwater demolition became 窶牢EAL missions窶?

The Naval Special Warfare Command was commissioned April 16, 1987, at the Naval Amphibious Base Coronado in San Diego, California. Its mission is to prepare Naval Special Warfare forces to carry out their assigned missions and to develop special operations strategy, doctrine, and tactics.


SEALs in woodlands operation.[edit]
Navy SEAL Teams and Structure
A Navy SEAL Platoon or "Boat Team" consists of 8 men per platoon. This can be easily split into two 4-man squads for operational purposes. The actual size of each SEAL "Team" is larger, ranging between eight to ten Boat Teams per SEAL Team.

As of this writing, there are seven confirmed Navy SEAL Teams. The original SEAL Teams in the Vietnam were separated between East Coast (Team One) and West Coast (Team Two) SEALs. The "Official" current SEAL Team deployments are from Teams 1 through 5, and 8:

SEAL Team ONE is based in Coronado, CA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has eight operational SEAL platoons and a headquarters element. SEAL Team ONE窶冱 geographic area of concentration is Southeast Asia.

SEAL Team TWO is based at Little Creek, VA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has eight operational platoons and a headquarters element. SEAL Team TWO窶冱 geographic area of concentration is Europe, and is the only SEAL team with an arctic warfare capability.

SEAL Team THREE is based in Coronado, CA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has eight operational platoons and a headquarters element. SEAL Team THREE窶冱 geographic area of concentration is Southwest Asia.

SEAL Team FOUR is based at Little Creek, VA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has ten operational platoons and a headquarters element. SEAL Team FOUR窶冱 geographic area of concentration is Central and South America. SEAL Team FOUR is the only SEAL Team with a viable standing language capability, Spanish.

SEAL Team FIVE is based in Coronado, CA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has eight operational platoons and a headquarters element. SEAL Team FIVE窶冱 geographic area of concentration is the Northern Pacific.

SEAL Team EIGHT is based at Little Creek, VA. Commanded by a Navy Commander (O-5), it has eight operational platoons and a headquarters element. SEAL Team EIGHT's geographic area of concentration is the Caribbean, Africa, and the Mediterranean.

In addition to these is SEAL Team SIX, the SEALs' primary counter-terrorist unit. Although every SEAL team trains in counter-terrorism, SEAL Team SIX, a.k.a. DEVGRU, specializes in it. Their history can be traced to the failed attempt to rescue hostages from the US embassy in Iran by Delta Force, the Army's CT unit. The Navy knew they could do better at counter-terrorism than the Army and DEVGRU was born.

It is not known or confirmed if there is a SEAL Team SEVEN, though many may presume that the clandestine unit Red Cell answers to that designation.

[edit]
Training
SEAL teams go through what is considered by military personnel around the world to be the toughest military training in the world. Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) training is conducted at the Naval Special Warfare Center in Coronado lasting 26 weeks. Students encounter obstacles that develop and test their stamina, leadership and ability to work as a team. On average, a BUD/S class can expect to lose about 70-80% of their initial muster from the beginning to the end of the course. BUD/S, and the SEALs as a whole, are voluntary services, and many BUD/S students find that they do not have the desire to continue to endure the physical and mental abuse, and subsequently Drop On Request, or DOR, from the course. After BUD/S, the students must then attend Army Jump School at Ft. Benning, GA, a relative breeze compared to BUD/S, in order to become airborne qualified. Finally, these apprentice warriors must go through SEAL Qualification Training, or SQT, which is a 15 week course, again conducted in and arround the Naval Amphibious Base Coronado.

BUD/S consists of a five-week "Indoctrination Course," followed by three phases, covering physical conditioning (eight weeks), diving (eight weeks), and land warfare (nine weeks) respectively. After the third phase recruits undergo a three-week Basic Parachute Training course at Fort Benning, followed by the receipt of their Naval Special Warfare Classification (NEC) code. BUD/S is known for Hell Week, a period of several days during First Phase when SEAL trainees are deprived of sleep (they get less than four hours the entire week), and made to do strenuous physical tasks far more difficult than those of any other week during the training cycle. Although SEAL classes typically lose around 75% of their trainees (DORs or injuries sustained during training), far fewer recruits quit after Hell Week than before. Although completion of BUD/S marks young men (women are not admitted into SEAL training) as standouts, they do not earn their SEAL pin, or Trident, until undergoing the SQT course.

Famous Navy SEALs
Thomas R. Norris - Vietnam-era SEAL, Medal of Honor Recipient.
Scott Helvenston - graduated training at 17, becoming the youngest Navy SEAL in history.
Rudy Boesch - competitor in the TV reality shows Survivor and Survivor: All-Stars.
Richard Marcinko - founder of SEAL Team SIX and Red Cell, and NY Times bestseller Rogue Warrior co-author.
Jesse Ventura - former Governor of Minnesota, actor, and former professional wrestler.
Roy Boehm - First commanding officer of Seal Team Two.
Dennis Chalker - plankowner of Seal Team Six and Red Cell
Gary Jackson - president Blackwater USA, a private military contractor
Chuck Pfarrer - SEAL Team SIX Operator, screenwriter with credits including The Jackal, Darkman, Red Planet, Virus, Hard Target, and Navy SEALS, and author of the NY Times bestseller Warrior Soul.


British Royal Marines Special Boat Service (SBS)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Boat_Service

The Special Boat Service (SBS) is the British Royal Navy's and Royal Marines窶 Special Forces unit. The service's motto is Not by Strength, By Guile.
History
The forerunner of the SBS, the Special Air Service, was formed in World War II during the North African conflict. And from that they formed as eight man sections of divers and canoeists to recce enemy fortifications from land or sea, raid enemy ports or conduct sabotage operations against merchant shipping. Originally it was named Special Boat Section.

After the war the SBS was not disbanded but absorbed into the Royal Marines in 1946. They became part of the School of Combined operations under the command of Blondie Hasler. Another two squadrons were formed in British troops in West Germany in 1951. Two volunteer squadrons expanded them later. Their first missions were in Palestine (ordnance removal) and in Haifa (limpet mine removal from ships).

SBS and Royal Marines were in action in the Korean War, alongside the North Korean coast. They gathered intelligence and destroyed railways and installations. SBS operated first from submarines and then from islands off Wonsan, behind enemy lines. They used 2-man canoes and inflatable boats with a motor.

In 1952 SBS teams were in combat readiness in Egypt in case Gamal Abdal Nasser窶冱 coup turned more violent than it did. They were also alerted during the Suez Crisis and during a coup against Libyan king Idris but did not see any action. Similar situations followed.

SBS teams did reconnaissance during the Indonesian Confrontation in 1961. They primarily gathered intelligence and trained other special forces during the Vietnam War. When Iraq threatened with the invasion of Kuwait for the first time in 1961, the SBS placed a detachment at Bahrain.

The SBS was later stationed in Gibraltar where they gathered intelligence in case Franco窶冱 Spain decided to take over. They found themselves involved with anti-drug activities in the Caribbean. In 1972 the SAS and SBS came into the spotlight for a moment during their involvement with a bomb threat 窶 that proved to be a hoax 窶 onboard the Cunard liner RMS Queen Elizabeth II, in the middle of the Atlantic.

The SBS adopted a new form of its name in 1977: Special Boat Squadron. In 1979, 5 SBS become part of the Comacchio Company that protects North Sea oil rigs. In 1987 it formed Special Forces Group alongside Special Air Service and the Fourteenth Intelligence Company (4 Int).

Throughout the Cold War the SBS was organized to perform a "conventional " special forces role for the Royal Marines 3 Commando Brigade. However in recent decades the SBS's role has become more and more involved in counter-terrorist operations.

The SBS were frequently involved in covert operations in Northern Ireland and SBS members also played a part in the 1980 Iranian Embassy Siege.

During the Falklands War 2 SBS took part of liberating South Georgia and 6 SBS reconnoitered in East Falkland. Their only losses were to friendly fire from the SAS.

During the Gulf War SBS made raids on the Kuwaiti coast to draw Iraqi troops away from the land attack. Liberation of the British Embassy in Kuwait was one of their most high-profile operations.

The SBS have been involved in operations in East Timor and Sierra Leone.

SBS units have recently been involved in operations in Afghanistan and Iraq.

[edit]
Selection
The SBS is not an independent unit but part of the Royal Marines. To be eligible for SBS selection, a candidate must have served for at least two years in the Royal Marines or the Royal Navy, and then pass a rigorous selection course.

Those who pass the selection course then undergo a swimmer canoeist (SC3) training course. During this course the candidates still considered to be 'on probation'. The swimmer canoeist course includes survival training in the wilds of Scotland and diving training in cold water with poor visibility. In the diving phase they swim underwater for miles in the dark and mud. The course includes beach reconnaissance, canoeing, photography, underwater demolitions, and maritime counter-terrorism training.

They serve for three years before they return to the Marines. The SBS is based in Poole, Dorset.

[edit]
Role
The SBS窶冱 role is not confined to seaborne and maritime operations 窶 their responsibilities do not end at the tide line. SBS training concentrates on swimming, demolitions, diving, infiltrating ships at sea and oil platforms, and parachuting. Klepper canoes are a regular issue. They can also use parachute and high-speed rope deployments from helicopters.

The SBS is thought to have a complement of around 100 "swimmer canoeists" at any time. These are split into three main groups. C squadron is responsible for canoe and diving operations. M squadron concentrates on counterterrorist and shipboard operations. S squadron takes care of small watercraft and minisub insertions. In addition, inside M squadron there is a Black Group, a counterterrorist team that use helicopter assaults.

SBS Veterans include British politician Paddy Ashdown, former leader of Liberal Democrats and British author and travel writer Eric Newby.








Russian spetsnaz

Spetsnaz (Войска специального назначения - спецназ/Voiska spetsialnogo naznacheniya - spetsnaz, /ʃpecnaz/ in IPA) is a general term for "Special Forces, SpecOps" in Russian, literally 'special purpose units'. In Russian the term is commonly used to denote special forces of all countries, but in English it is used only for the Russian special forces. In fact, its use in English is usually associated with Russians writing in English or with writers having pretensions of linguistic authenticity. English media generally refers to them as Russian special forces and, in fact, usually refers to special forces of any other country by a similar generic term.

Spetsnaz can refer to elite units controlled by the Federal Security Service (FSB) with counter-terrorist and anti-sabotage tasks, Ministry of Interior (of the police) MVD, and the army special forces controlled by the military intelligence service GRU.

Strictly speaking all SPETSNAZ units operated by the KGB/FSB are called OSNAZ, an acronym for [voiska] osobogo naznacheniya or "special purpose [detachments]". This units were originally raised for internal use against counter-revolutionaries, dissidents and other undesirables. There has always been a certain amount of shifting of personnel and units between both the GRU who control SPETSNAZ and the MVD with OSNAZ MVD and OZNAZ KGB or FSB, especially between the latter two.

Spetsnaz carry out reconaissance and social warfare missions in "peacetime" as well as in war. For example, it is known that the assassination of Afghanistan's president carried out by spetsnaz in December 1979 was under the direction of the KGB.

According to Vladimir Rezun, a GRU defector who used the pseudonym "Viktor Suvorov", there were 20 Spetsnaz brigades plus 41 separate companies. Thus, total strength of Spetsnaz forces in the 1980s could have been around 30,000 troops.

http://www.spetsnaz.com.br/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spetsnaz
 

TwistedMac

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Well, I've seen some mad impressive stuff about Spetsnaz, and I think if you want a job done and you want it done well, these are the guys you go to.

It'll probably be messy though.

My guess is the best elite force and the most stealthy one in the world is unheard of. That is sort of what they're supposed to do... stay hidden. It's when they screw up we hear about them.

We've recently gotten to know about a previously unheard of squad in sweden called.. uhmm.. I think it's SSG. (Swedish Safety Guard) or something like that. Apparently they were in Iraq doing recon a few months before the Americans entered.. which is scandalous since officially we were never supposed to be there.
 

Zauriel

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Twisted Mac, SSg sounds like an interesting topic.

I am adding more info about other special elite forces

Sayeret Matkal

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sayeret_Matkal

Sayeret Matkal is the elite special forces unit of the Israeli Defence Force. Its main roles are counter terror, deep reconnaissance and intelligence gathering. The unit is modelled on the British SAS. It is best known for Operation Entebbe, in which they rescued more than 100 AirFrance airline passengers hijacked to Uganda by PLO terrorists.

Notable (former) Sayeret Matkal figures are Ehud Barak and Benjamin Netanyahu (former Israeli prime-ministers) and his older brother Yonathan Netanyahu (killed in Operation Entebbe).

[edit]
Known operations
Foiling a Sabena airliner hijack (hostages rescue) - 1972
Operation Spring of Youth (killing Black September terrorists in Beirut) - 1973
Operation Entebbe (hostages rescue) - 1976

Kommando Spezialkrテ、fte (KSK)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KSK

The Kommando Spezialkrテ、fte (KSK) (lit. "special forces command") is part of Germany's special forces. It is closely modelled on the British Special Air Service (SAS).

[edit]
History
The KSK was established in 1996 and has taken on duty on April 1, 1997, to face the new threats emerging after the end of the cold war. Before that, (West) Germany had placed little emphasis on special forces, relying on the GSG 9, a (border) police unit, for counter-terrorist work.

Since its inception, the KSK has been on duty in the war in Kosovo and in Afghanistan. Its missions are top secret, therefore no specific details are known.

[edit]
Structure
The KSK is stationed in Calw in the Black forest in southern Germany. It consists of about 1000 soldiers, 420 of whom are in fighting units.

The fighting units are divided into four commando companies of 80 men each and a long range reconnaissance unit of 100 men. Each of the four commando companies has four specialised platoons:

1st platoon: land insertions
2nd platoon: airborne entering
3rd platoon: amphibious operations
4th platoon: operations under special geographic or meteorlogic surroundings (e.g. mountains or polar-regions)
There are four commando groups in every platoon. Each of these groups consists of four about equally skilled soldiers plus a varying number of specialists (medics, explosives/heavy weapons/communications/language experts).

[edit]
Equipment
Heckler und Koch G36 assault rifle - special version
Heckler und Koch MP5 submachine gun in various versions.
Heckler und Koch MP7 submachine gun
Accuracy International G22 sniper rifle
Heckler und Koch P8 pistol (military version of the HK USP) - special version
special weapons and ammunition (ultrasound, anti-tank etc.)
snowmobiles
folding boats
high-altitude gliding parachute equipment
They are assisted by German army troops (Heeresflieger) with additional vehicles:
Eurocopter Tiger assault helicopters
NH-90 transport helicopters

South African Special Forces Brigade

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_Special_Forces_Brigade

The South African Special Forces Brigade is the main special forces unit of the South African Army.

It consists of Special Forces Headquarters in Pretoria, 4 Special Forces Regiment in Langebaan, 5 Special Forces Regiment - Phalaborwa and the Special Forces School in Murrayhill.

4 Special Forces Regiment specialise in maritime-related activities, whereas 5 Special Forces regiment specialises more in overland techniques, especially long-range infiltration.

[edit]
History
The first South African special forces unit, 1 Reconnaissance Commando, was established in the town of Oudtshoorn, Cape Province on 1 October 1972. On 1 January 1975, this unit was relocated to Durban, Natal, where it continued its activities as the airborne specialist unit of the special forces.

Later, two additional Reconnaissance Commando were formed:

4 Reconnaissance Commando, specialising in seaborne operations, was established in the coastal town of Langebaan, Cape Province.
5 Reconnaissance Commando was established at the Duku-Duku camp in Northern Natal, but was later moved to Phalaborwa in the Transvaal province.
On 1 January 1981, a reorganisation of special forces took place, as part of which the Reconnaisance Commandos and other special forces were transformed into an independent formation, directly under the command of the (then) South African Defence Force (instead of the South African Army). As part of the reorganisation, the various Reconnaissance Commandos were also given the status of regiments. In the latter part of the same decade, a special forces headquarters and a special forces stores depot were also added to the special forces structure.

In 1991, the structure of the special forces underwent another change, when the special forces headquarters was disbanded and a Directorate Reconnaissance, reporting directly to the Chief of the Army, was established instead.

Another organisational change followed in 1993, when the Directorate Reconnaissance became 45 Parachute Brigade. As a result of this, all the units were renamed: 1 Reconnaissance Regiment became 452 Parachute Battalion, 4 Reconnaissance Regiment became 453 Parachute Battalion and 5 Reconnaissance Regiment became 451 Parachute Battalion.

As a result of the changes that took place in South Africa after the first fully democratic elections, the special forces organisation was changed to its current structure in 1996. The Special Forces Brigade, as it is presently known, consists of 4 and 5 Special Forces Regiments as well as 1 Maintenance Unit, which provides logistic support.

As part of the military transformation process, 1 Special Forces Regiment was disbanded in 1996.

Due to the peacekeeping and other duties which the South African National Defence Force have been tasked with in recent times, new opportunities for the deployment of the special forces are continiously presenting themselves, which promises a major growth potential for these units.
 

sgt. Pepper

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I would guess it's SAS, but i'm no expert.

Mac: What!? Are you a 100% sure? Damn, i really hope that Moderaterna (right-wing) wins the upcoming election. The socialdemocrats (i hope it means the same in english) just screws everything up.
 

TwistedMac

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actually, M were the ones pushing for the SSG to go -_- It's pretty old news by now though :p
 

sgt. Pepper

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I didn't know about this! Then they can't win either...and by then i'm old enough to vote. Damn it. I'm leaving a blank (spelling?) vote.
 

Uncle Frank

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Nice Job Of Typing And Links !!

Being an old Navy man, I have to say Seals!

Frank

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Mycernius

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SBS and I'm not being patriotic about them. They only take form the Royal Marines, unlike the SAS, who take from every Army regiment. The SBS actually train using the SAS as the enemy. Unlike the SAS they are less high profile. Royal marines are tough as well. It was them that ransacked and burnt down Washington DC in the war of 1812.
 

jieshi

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TwistedMac said:
Well, I've seen some mad impressive stuff about Spetsnaz, and I think if you want a job done and you want it done well, these are the guys you go to.

It'll probably be messy though.

My guess is the best elite force and the most stealthy one in the world is unheard of. That is sort of what they're supposed to do... stay hidden. It's when they screw up we hear about them.

We've recently gotten to know about a previously unheard of squad in sweden called.. uhmm.. I think it's SSG. (Swedish Safety Guard) or something like that. Apparently they were in Iraq doing recon a few months before the Americans entered.. which is scandalous since officially we were never supposed to be there.

hehe well these guys sound interesting so I might go with mac on them.

though i have always had a fascination with the SAS and the Marines because I have always read really interesting stories about them (it was my goal once to be part of the Australian SAS forces)
 

Index

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What's with the obsession to always have to have 'the best' this or that? It's a completely unrealistic question to ask because what is best depends on your perspective and what you are talking about. As in everything else, various special forces specialize in different aspects, and not always by choice. They may have more experience in this or that, because of opportunity, tradition, or policy. Special Forces do not have just one kind of function either, so one group may be more effective in regard to intelligence gathering, for example, whilst another may be better at something else. One of the advantages of having alliances such as NATO is the access that commanders have in choosing the appropriate force for the task at hand.
 
Last edited:

BrennaCeDria

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Yea, without any education or wikipedia or anything else I was going to say the same thing as Leroy. Although, it would be more impressive if god would just lightning bolt any threats to the Pope. :p
 

Sensuikan San

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I must say that I agree with the sentiments of Index.

With that in mind, and I am very distressed to say it ... but the one group that seems to be able to acheive what it wants to achieve, with very little effective resistance, as far as I can see ....

.....is...

"Al Quaeda"....

Sadly,

ニ淡ニ停?。ニ停?
 

Zauriel

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To administrator or moderator.

I intended to include Navy Seals in the poll but I was so sleepy I made a mistake and accidentally posted the Delta Force in another option. Please replace the second option "Delta Force" with Navy Seals
 

Doc

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You don't have the choice I want on your poll. Sure it's police run and it's French, but it's considered the best CT group in the world. You know what I'm talking about, the good ol' GIGN.

Doc:ramen:😄
 

TwistedMac

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GIGN isn't elite military, so they don't really fit into the group at all. they're just an anti terrorist squad. Like you said, Police, not army. Quite different.
 

Doc

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TwistedMac said:
GIGN isn't elite military, so they don't really fit into the group at all. they're just an anti terrorist squad. Like you said, Police, not army. Quite different.

Yes, but I have a buddy in the military who is in speical forces who has claimed from training exercises with them, that the GIGN is better than Delta in some cases with certain ops that include military elements.

Doc:ramen:😄
 

Lina Inverse

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You're really missing out there big time - why didn't you mention the German GSG9!? It can surely rival those others listed! :p
Here's the Wikipedia entry:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grenzschutzgruppe_9

Grenzschutzgruppe 9 (GSG 9 - "Border protection group 9") is a German counter-terrorism unit, and is considered to be among the best of such units in the world. Many other counterterrorist units were modelled after the GSG-9.

Organization
The unit forms part of the Bundesgrenzschutz (Federal Border Guard), and has normal police powers, including for example the power of arrest. The Border Guard (and thus the GSG-9), is under the control of the federal ministry of the interior. The Bundesgrenzschutz also provides aerial transportation for the GSG-9. In contrast, regular police are responsible to the various States or Länder, as are Sondereinsatzkommandos (SEK) (German equivalent of SWAT), while the military is responsible for the KSK (special forces).

The GSG-9 is based in Sankt Augustin-Hangelar near Bonn and consists of three main sub-groups, plus a number of support groups as shown below.

GSG-9/1 (regular counter-terrorism)
The first sub group of the GSG-9 is used for regular land based counter-terrorism actions. This may involve cases of hostage taking, kidnapping, terrorism, and extortion. The group may also be used to secure locations, neutralize targets, sniping and fugitive hunting. The group has approximately 100 members.
[edit]

GSG-9/2 (maritime counter-terrorism)
The second sub group of the GSG-9 is used for counter-terrorism at sea, for example the hijacking of ships or oil platforms. The group has approximately 100 members.
[edit]

GSG-9/3 (airborne counter-terrorism)
The third sub group of the GSG-9 is used for counter-terrorism involving airborne operations, including parachuting and helicopter landings. The group has approximately 50 members.
[edit]

Technical Unit
This unit supports other units in obtaining entry to target areas.
[edit]

Central Services
This service group maintains the armoury of the GSG-9, and is involved in testing, repairing and purchasing weapons, ammunition, and explosives.
[edit]

Documentation Unit
This unit handles the communications of the GSG-9, including the testing, repairing and purchasing of communications and surveillance equipment.
[edit]

Operations Staff
This is the administration of the GSG-9.
[edit]

Training Unit
This unit trains existing members, and selects, recruits and trains the new members.
[edit]

Tasks
The GSG-9 is used to act against cases of hostage taking, kidnapping, terrorism, and extortion. The group may also be used to secure locations, neutralize targets, sniping and fugitive hunting. Furthermore, the group is very active in developing and testing methods and tactics for these tasks. Finally, the group may provide consultation to the different Länder, Ministries and international allies. The group assists the Bundesgrenzschutz and other federal and local agencies by request.
[edit]

Training
Members of the Bundesgrenzschutz with 2 years of service can join the GSG-9. The 22-week training period includes 13 weeks of basic training and 9 weeks of advanced training. Besides medical tests there are many physical and psychological requirements, for example running 5000 meters within 23 minutes and jump a distance of at least 2.4 meters (from a standstill). . The identity of the GSG-9 members is classified as top secret. Further training often involves cooperation with other allied counter-terrorism units.
[edit]

History
The unit was established in 1972 under the leadership of (then Colonel) Ulrich K. Wegener, after the police failed miserably in dealing with the "Munich massacre" - a terrorist action carried out by the Black September movement during the 1972 Summer Olympic Games. The GSG-9 was officially established on April 17, 1973. Its formation was based on expertise of the British SAS and the Israeli Sayeret Matkal; Wegner emphasizes the importance of the Israelis.

The best-known mission of the GSG-9 was the freeing of the hostages of the RAF ("Red Army Faction") terrorist group in the Lufthansa flight 707 Landshut in Mogadishu, Somalia in the night of the 17th & 18th October 1977. For details of the hijacking see RAF or German Autumn.
[edit]

Publicly known missions
* October 17/18 1977: Freeing all 86 hostages held by a Red Army Faction group in the Lufthansa flight 707 Landshut in Mogadishu, Somalia
* 1982: Arrest of the RAF terrorists Mohnhaupt and Schulz
* June 27 1993: Arrest of the RAF terrorists Birgit Hogefeld and Wolfgang Grams in Bad Kleinen. Some people believed that Wolfgang Grams was executed in revenge for the death of the GSG-9 operative Michael Newrzella during the mission. Grams had shot and killed Newrzella when Newrzella tried to tackle him. However, the official investigation determined that Grams committed suicide.
* 1993: Ending of the hijacking of a KLM flight from Tunis to Amsterdam, redirected to Düsseldorf without firing a single shot.
* 1994: End of a hostage situation in the Kassel Penitentiary
* 1994: Involved in the search for the kidnappers Albert and Polak
* 1998: Arrest of a extortionist of the German railway Deutsche Bahn AG
* 1999: Arrest of Metin Kaplan in Cologne
* 1999: Arrest of two suspected members of the Roten Zellen in Berlin
* 1999: Involved in the ending of the hijacking in the central bank in Aachen
* 2000: Advised the Philippines related to a hostage situation
* 2001: Arrested two spies in Heidelberg
* 2001: Aided in the liberation of four German tourists in Egypt
* 2001: Arrested a number of terrorists related to the September 11, 2001 attacks
* 2002: Arrested a number of terrorists related to the September 11, 2001 attacks
* 2003: Protection of the four members of the German Technisches Hilfswerk (THW) (the governmental disaster relief organization of Germany) in Baghdad, Iraq. The THW's mission is to repair the water distribution network.
* 2004: The GSG 9 is responsible for protecting property and personnel of the German embassy in Baghdad. On April 7th 2004 two members were attacked near Fallujah while in a convoy travelling from Amman (Jordan) to Baghdad. The two men age 25 and 38 were travelling in a car at the rear of the convoy, and therefore received most of the enemy fire after passing the ambush. The men were shot after their armoured Mercedes was hit and stopped by RPGs. In a later statement, the attackers apologized for mistaking the German convoy for an American convoy.

However, most of the missions are confidential and not made public. Since the founding of the GSG-9 the group has participated on over 1300 missions, yet fired shots only on 4 occasions (official count, prior to the war in Iraq 2003). These occasions were 1977 in Mogadishu and 1993 in Bad Kleinen, furthermore two more missions where firearms were used to defend themselves against dogs of the persons to be arrested.
[edit]

Equipment
* Heckler & Koch MP5 submachine gun in various versions.
* Heckler & Koch PSG-1 sniper rifle and G8 automatic rifle.
* SIG 550 assault rifle
* GLOCK 17 pistol
 

Flashjeff

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I was in the Navy, so my vote's for the SEALS. Those guys are major badasses!
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Mal

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I think it really depends on what you want to do.

For instance, if I wanted to retrieve hostages from a site and not lose any of them I would probably pick the SAS.

If I wanted to have some guys infiltrate a base and kill every last person in it, I would probably pick SEALS.

I should add as a note here that I don't think that the SAS is incapable of laying down as much death as the SEALS are, just that it would take twice as many of them ><


Oh and as for a completely terrifying side note - I have a buddy who works at langly and one night while we were talking over a few beers, he didn't out right say anything (if you know what I mean) but he strongly hinted that there was a big scandal at his work over some agents investigating some possible internal government theft and finding out that certain branches of the US special forces have access to a variety of arms that no country in the world would admit to having. Evidently the bosses knew about it, but didn't shut down the investigation in time to keep some relatively junior agents from discovering it.

I really hope he was just bullshitting me because I don't even want to think about what you could do with some of that stuff.
 

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窶禿塒弯
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Aside from chemical, biological, nuclear and conventional (plus space based weapons), what other varieties hasn't the US government admitted to having?
 

Davey

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wow, bit to long post, but nice info!!!!

well i WOuld choose the Rangers ( there not on it..)

Rangers Lead the Way isnt?
 
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