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What is のは, のが, が?

Daiten

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I have been reviewing my Japanese for the past couple days and I have become stumped as to what のは (no wa), のが, and が are. I have been reviewing from a book called Barron's Japanese Grammar by Carol and Nobu Akiyama.
My first concern is the particle が. It is used for various things and one of them I believe is "but" (and there is けど)

Example:

パーティにいきますが、プレゼントがない。
paati ni ikimasu ga, purezento ga nai.

Can you say: パーティにいきますけど、プレゼントがない。
paati ni ikimasu kedo, purezento ga nai

Essentially, what is the difference between けど (kedo) and が (ga)?
Next, のが (no ga) and のは (no wa). Because of these particles, I've had trouble sleeping at night, thinking about them :blackeye:
In a sentence:
旅行するのは、楽しいです。
Ryokou suru no wa, tanoshii desu.
and

習字をするのが大好きです。
manabu suru no-ga daisuki desu.

The way I am understanding is that these particles (especially no wa; のは) are nominatives, making a non-noun into a noun. Is it because in order to describe the verb, it has to be nominalized? But what about for a noun such as in (meaning that Im already using a noun), 魚のが大好きです. 魚 being the noun. And why is the verb made into a noun when it is nominalized.

Another のが (no ga) example:

私は、食べるのが大好き
Watashi wa, taberu no ga daisuki

Why cant it be : 私は、食べるが大好き
watashi wa, taberu ga daisuki

PLEASE PLEASE help me on this 😅
今、このコンピュータを使って、日本語が読めますが、家のコンピュータは、日本語を読むができない。そして、家のコンピュ ーターのために、ローマ字で書いてください。
(I know I definitely messed up on my particles here. Sometimes I don't know when to use を and が. I tried to used が for "but" in the sentence.)
本当にありがとう
 

Half-n-Half

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Understand I am not a fluent Japanese speaker, but I will explain as best I can. Take my explanations with a grain of salt :oops:

I have been reviewing my Japanese for the past couple days and I have become stumped as to what のは (no wa), のが, and が are. I have been reviewing from a book called Barron's Japanese Grammar by Carol and Nobu Akiyama.
My first concern is the particle が. It is used for various things and one of them I believe is "but" (and there is けど)
Example:
パーティにいきますが、プレゼントがない。
paati ni ikimasu ga, purezento ga nai.
Can you say: パーティにいきますけど、プレゼントがない。
paati ni ikimasu kedo, purezento ga nai
Essentially, what is the difference between けど (kedo) and が (ga)?

Essentially they are the same. From what I understand, "ga" is more polite/less colloquial/softer sounding than "kedo." Usually "ga" comes after a "~masu" ending while "kedo" will come after a plain form ending of a verb.

Next, のが (no ga) and のは (no wa). Because of these particles, I've had trouble sleeping at night, thinking about them
In a sentence:
旅行するのは、楽しいです。
Ryokou suru no wa, tanoshii desu.
and
習字をするのが大好きです。
manabu suru no-ga daisuki desu.
The way I am understanding is that these particles (especially no wa; のは) are nominatives, making a non-noun into a noun. Is it because in order to describe the verb, it has to be nominalized? But what about for a noun such as in (meaning that Im already using a noun), 魚のが大好きです. 魚 being the noun. And why is the verb made into a noun when it is nominalized.

Yes, it nominalizes the verb phrase. Just like in English we don't say, "I like eat" but instead we change it to the gerund ~ing form and say, "I like eating." Your sakana example seems to me like it is talking about something about the fish, but I'm not sure. Is there any context surrounding that sentence? If you put "no" after a noun, it's usually to indicate possession, so for example, in English we could say, "Who's book is this?" and answer "It's mine" instead of "It's my book." So instead of, "Watashi no hon desu." if it can be understood from context you can just say "Watashi no desu." I'm not sure if your example is following this, but that is the only thing I can think of.

Another のが (no ga) example:
私は、食べるのが大好き
Watashi wa, taberu no ga daisuki
Why cant it be : 私は、食べるが大好き
watashi wa, taberu ga daisuki

As stated above, you have to nominalize it. That would be the equivalent of saying, "I like eat" in English.
 

Daiten

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Half-n-half,

I think I am understanding a little.

As for the context of the fish, I should have said WATASHI wa, saka wo taberu no ga daisuki. (hoping it made sense: I like to eat fish alot).

I remember distantly a teacher of mine saying that instead of saying "watashi no hon desu" you can say "watashi no desu" to avoid repition.

One of the things I am also having trouble understanding is that in no wa and in no ga, does no imply possession as in is "no" carrying out its possessive properties?

Now, if I say (watashi wa), ryokou suru no wa tanoshii (I enjoy traveling), is the "no" implying that I am avoiding repetition in this case? Such as in the case of "watashi no desu". But then, this "no", what is ryokou suru in possession of? Again, this would sound repetitive if I say "ryokou suru no ryokou wa tanoshi" (?)

Let me give another example:

Nihon no tabemono no ga suki desu (i like Japanese food). How would it sound if I repeated "taberu" nihon no tabemono wo taberu (no) gau suki. In "Tabemono no ga", I am using "no" after tabemono to avoid the repetition of the verb (taberu)? Sorry, I know this sounds a bit confusing (I havent a lot of time in my hands as I type so I had to rush).

Thanks Half-and-Half ^_^
 
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Yukiko chan

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Hello Daiten.

I'm too busy to give a detailed response, but here are some quick remarks:

1/ のは (nowa) and のが (noga) aren't particles. They're actually made of the combination of two particles の (no)+は(wa) and の(no)+が(ga). You can also find に(ni)+は(wa) or の(no)+に(ni) as well (but the particle のに(noni) (despite, in spite of) also exists).

2/ The particle の(no) has 6 different uses I think (the ones I know at least). When used after a verb it entails the meaning of "the fact of doing something" which could be considered as a noun, and thus be referred to by は(wa) or が(ga) as the subject or object of a sentence.

3/ が(ga) can only refer to an object/subject if it's a noun, so in order to refer to an action as an object/subject you must nominalize the verb using こと(koto), もの(mono), or の(no). When が(ga) is used meaning "but" it can only follow a verb (and not any form of verbs), thus if you pay attention there's no way you'd confuse those two uses of が(ga).

4/ I'll try to get back on that later, unless someone more qualified answered your questions.

今、このコンピュータを使って、日本語が読めますが、家のコンピュータは、日本語を読むができない。そして、家のコンピュ ーターのために、ローマ字で書いてください。

今、このコンピューターを使って、日本語が読めますが、家のコンピューター、日本語を読むこと (or の)ができないです*。そして、家のコンピューターのために**、ローマ字で書いてください。

ima、kono konpyûtâ wo tsukutte, nihongo ga yomemasu ga, ie no konpyûtâ de, nihongo wo yomu koto (or no) ga dekinai desu*.soshite,ie no konpyûtâ no tame ni**, rômaji de kaite kudasai。

*Just to keep the same level of politeness.

**Not sure, I'd personally state the last sentence as: sono tame ni wa, rômaji de kaite kudasai.
 
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Elizabeth

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Half-n-half,
I think I am understanding a little.
As for the context of the fish, I should have said WATASHI wa, saka wo taberu no ga daisuki. (hoping it made sense: I like to eat fish alot).
I remember distantly a teacher of mine saying that instead of saying "watashi no hon desu" you can say "watashi no desu" to avoid repition.
One of the things I am also having trouble understanding is that in no wa and in no ga, does no imply possession as in is "no" carrying out its possessive properties?
Now, if I say (watashi wa), ryokou suru no wa tanoshii (I enjoy traveling), is the "no" implying that I am avoiding repetition in this case? Such as in the case of "watashi no desu". But then, this "no", what is ryokou suru in possession of? Again, this would sound repetitive if I say "ryokou suru no ryokou wa tanoshi" (?)
Let me give another example:
Nihon no tabemono no ga suki desu (i like Japanese food). How would it sound if I repeated "taberu" nihon no tabemono wo taberu (no) gau suki. In "Tabemono no ga", I am using "no" after tabemono to avoid the repetition of the verb (taberu)? Sorry, I know this sounds a bit confusing (I havent a lot of time in my hands as I type so I had to rush).
Thanks Half-and-Half ^_^

Nihon no tabemono ga suki desu

Like, half & half clarified -- "No ga" nominalizes the VERB/ADJECTIVE to create a noun phrase. After a noun, use "wa" as a topic marker or "ga" is a subject marker or "wo" as an object marker (don't worry about the nuances of difference for now), but not in conjunction with "no" to mean "I like Japanese food." In this example, "ga" is marking "tabemono" as the subject. It can imply but/although/however/ following either an adjective or verb.

Nihon no tabemono ga (dai) suki desu OR Nihon no tabemono wo taberu no ga (dai)suki desu. is fine.

(watashi wa), ryokou suru no ga tanoshii desu. seems a bit more natural.
 
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Toritoribe

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Yes, it nominalizes the verb phrase. Just like in English we don't say, "I like eat" but instead we change it to the gerund ~ing form and say, "I like eating." Your sakana example seems to me like it is talking about something about the fish, but I'm not sure. Is there any context surrounding that sentence? If you put "no" after a noun, it's usually to indicate possession, so for example, in English we could say, "Who's book is this?" and answer "It's mine" instead of "It's my book." So instead of, "Watashi no hon desu." if it can be understood from context you can just say "Watashi no desu." I'm not sure if your example is following this, but that is the only thing I can think of.
Agreed. We can use that sentence, for instance, in the following context.

肉のフライと魚のフライではどっちが好き?
Niku no FURAI to sakana no FURAI de wa docchi ga suki?
Which do you like, fried meat or fried fish?

魚のが大好きです。
Sakana no ga daisuki desu.
I love the fish one.

(watashi wa), ryokou suru no ga tanoshii desu. seems a bit more natural.
Right. "Ryokou suru no ga suki desu" is also fine. "Ryokou suru no wa tanoshii" sounds more likely "generally speaking, traveling is fun/pleasant."

今、このコンピュータを使って、日本語が読めますが、家のコンピュータは、日本語を読むができない。そして、家のコンピューターのために、ローマ字で書いてください。
I would say like this.

今使っているこのパソコンでは日本語が読めますが、家のでは読めません。だから/ですからローマ字で書いてくれませんか/もらえませんか?
Ima tsukatteiru kono PASOKON* de wa** Nihongo ga yomemasu ga, ie no*** de wa yomemasen. Desukara/Dakara RO-MAji de kaite kuremasen ka?/moraemasen ka?

*The clause "ima tsukatteiru" is qualifying "kono PASOKON"; "this PC that I'm using now."
**This "wa" acts as a contrastive marker.
***The same usage to "watashi no desu."
 

Daiten

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Hey all,

Oh my gosh, I love you all for helping me out! <3 I think I am beginning to understand, little by little. I will try to reply more on this later due to the lack of time.

For those who helped me on that little Japanese phrase, thank you for correcting and putting up with my horrible Japanese. I just hope my penpal can put up with it as well. I really never realized just how many levels of politeness there were, as well as various ways of putting the sentence.

Thank you and I will try to reply later for comprehension ^_^
 

Elizabeth

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Ie no pasokon ni ha Nihongo IME ga haitte imasenka? Sore ga dekimasenka?

ローマ字を読むと頭痛が起きます。:0
 

nhk9

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Yes, it nominalizes the verb phrase. Just like in English we don't say, "I like eat" but instead we change it to the gerund ~ing form and say, "I like eating." Your sakana example seems to me like it is talking about something about the fish, but I'm not sure. Is there any context surrounding that sentence? If you put "no" after a noun, it's usually to indicate possession, so for example, in English we could say, "Who's book is this?" and answer "It's mine" instead of "It's my book." So instead of, "Watashi no hon desu." if it can be understood from context you can just say "Watashi no desu." I'm not sure if your example is following this, but that is the only thing I can think of.
As stated above, you have to nominalize it. That would be the equivalent of saying, "I like eat" in English.

In English you can say "I like to eat" with the infinitive, aside from "I like eating". In beginners' classes, teachers tell you that you must nominalize it, but it's not 100% true. Remnants from archaic Japanese such as 見るがよい (roughtly it's good to look at sth) or ~ざるを得ない (one has to do sth) still exist in modern Japanese.
 
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