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What degree should I get?

ChugokuRiben

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Hey guys, I know there was essentially the exact question asked about a decade ago, but things might have changed and would really like some opinions here. I'm currently a 2nd year Uni student studying Computer and Network Engineering and Business, looking to major in International Business in the near future. I'm looking to move to Japan in the not too near future, but eventually, I'm a bit lost in life (as any Uni student studying really), and was wondering what would increase my chance of landing a decent paying job in Japan in regards to the following Degrees: Computer and Network Engineering, Automotive Engineering and Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
These degrees are all very similar, but demand for each would be very different I imagine.
If anybody knows what Japan is demanding and will be demanding please leave a comment.
Thanks in Advance!
 

Glenski

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The first thing you're going to need is high fluency in reading, writing, speaking Japanese. JLPT 2 equivalency is usually what's asked for in job ads. See what I mean at Career Cross.

Don't get hung up on "decent paying". It won't be, so it will pay to be frugal. Company "freshmen", as they are called, start on a bottom rung of the ladder. You can see what that means in the link or in ads on the Japan Times or Metropolis web site. You may have to live in the company dorm facilities or rent a place on your own. The latter can be expensive, depending on your needs.

You might find work in a foreign branch office in Japan. In which case, learning a lot of Japanese might not be as necessary, but why would you not learn it if you plan to live here? Besides, you might change jobs to a company that isn't using English as the corporate language.

If you've never been here, you might want to try scraping up enough money to visit. Granted, being a tourist is no substitute for living here, but it will scrape the surface. Consider internships, too, for something even more substantial.
 

ChugokuRiben

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The first thing you're going to need is high fluency in reading, writing, speaking Japanese. JLPT 2 equivalency is usually what's asked for in job ads. See what I mean at Career Cross.

Don't get hung up on "decent paying". It won't be, so it will pay to be frugal. Company "freshmen", as they are called, start on a bottom rung of the ladder. You can see what that means in the link or in ads on the Japan Times or Metropolis web site. You may have to live in the company dorm facilities or rent a place on your own. The latter can be expensive, depending on your needs.

You might find work in a foreign branch office in Japan. In which case, learning a lot of Japanese might not be as necessary, but why would you not learn it if you plan to live here? Besides, you might change jobs to a company that isn't using English as the corporate language.

If you've never been here, you might want to try scraping up enough money to visit. Granted, being a tourist is no substitute for living here, but it will scrape the surface. Consider internships, too, for something even more substantial.
Thanks, that was very informative, yes, I will be learning Japanese. I've stayed in Japan for a while as a 'tourist', as I'm half Japanese, I stayed with relatives as well as with friends. Learning to write and read Japanese will prove to be the biggest problem for me to overcome as I didn't struggle too much when talking to my relatives.
 

AmerikaJin5

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I've become less sure over time as to how important specific degrees are in Japan. One of my Taiwanese friends landed a nice job as a petroleum resources saleswoman (requiring a year of company training on a technical matter) yet she had a masters degree in Japanese literature. So how did she do it? I'm guessing it's because she passed JLPT-N1 nearly 10 years ago and has been living in Japan over 5 years. Had nothing to do with her degree. I'd say don't worry about the specifics too much.
 
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