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News Two English teachers stand up for their rights

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thomas

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In the course of the Ghosn case, the Japanese judicial system has been receiving a lot of flak. However, it‘s reassuring to know it‘s still working, even for foreigners.

As the following case demonstrates:

 

Glenski

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Very interesting simply from the aspect that this was the lawyer's first case, and that he did it pro bono.
 

nahadef

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mdchachi

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Does this mean he's blacklisted out of teaching now? Or word doesn't get around that easily?
 

Deibiddo

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it‘s reassuring to know it‘s still working, even for foreigners.
Generally. It's working as it was designed to do which isn't necessarily a good thing. Access to legal means of resolving disputes can be quite difficult and there isn't much legal aid I'm aware of like there used to be in the UK.

Does this mean he's blacklisted out of teaching now? Or word doesn't get around that easily?
It depends on whether they do a background check on him or not. I've read the article but forgotten their names already lol I'm a member of a union which has been a Godsend but they say never talk about it in interviews. I remember even just asking out of hand if a teaching position at a school was gyomu itaku or galen and the (Japanese) interviewers just laughed at me... I didn't get the job! The union said I looked too knowledgeable about legal matters...

I'd buy that lawyer a beer if we ever met though, great guy for doing that
 
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