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This train will stop at every station _ Tokyo.

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Kouhai
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Which is the best for the blank of this sentence?
All can be used?
Any difference?

This train will stop at every station _ Tokyo.

1, from
2, after
3, beyond
or any others?
 

mdchachi

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To me, they seem equivalent in meaning. Well I guess you could say "from" is inclusive of Tokyo and "after" and "beyond" are not. But in this particular example I would assume the train stops at Tokyo also. I can't think of any others offhand.
 

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Kouhai
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Thank you very much for your comment.
I wanted to know how a native speaker would feel.
 

ianchan

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Personally i think that after seems the most natural. From and beyond seem like they need more info whereas if you say after it just seems more clear for some reason.
 

WonkoTheSane

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I can't wrap my head around actually hearing 1 used.

The others sound fine, though 2 sounds most likely. 1 just sounds wrong when I say it aloud.
 

mdchachi

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I can't wrap my head around actually hearing 1 used.

The others sound fine, though 2 sounds most likely. 1 just sounds wrong when I say it aloud.
I think it's most natural if you add a to <somewhere> phrase. Like this train will stop at every station from Tokyo to the end of the line. But if you consider the to-clause is implied, I still think it's ok. There's an example on this page: North White Plains is the end for some trains stopping at every station from GCT.
 

WonkoTheSane

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I think it's most natural if you add a to <somewhere> phrase. Like this train will stop at every station from Tokyo to the end of the line. But if you consider the to-clause is implied, I still think it's ok. There's an example on this page: North White Plains is the end for some trains stopping at every station from GCT.
I agree that with the to-clause it works, but I don't think it sounds right without explicitly saying the to-clause. It certainly sounds more Japanese with the to-clause implied. :D
 
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