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The term "混ざり合う"

barzh13

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I'm having a hard time understanding how the term was used from its root form. I know it means to blend/mix/stir and comes from either 混ぜる, 混ぜ合わす or 混ず. The way it was used was to describe 色 so 混ざり合う色 (mixed up colors? mixing colors?). What's being conveyed is not so much concerning as much as knowing the derivation of the term to me. I appreciate any help so thank you.
 

Toritoribe

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You are confusing the intransitive 混ざる and transitive 混ぜる, and also the intransitive 合う and transitive 合わせる/合わす.

る (intransitive)
る (transitive)

EDIT:
You mentioned the classical verb 混ず, which is indeed the etymology of both 混ざる and 混ぜる, but I think it's too advanced to explain about the historical background or the existence of another intransitive verb 混じる and 合わさる.
 
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barzh13

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You are confusing the intransitive 混ざる and transitive 混ぜる, and also the intransitive 合う and transitive 合わせる/合わす.

る (intransitive)
る (transitive)

EDIT:
You mentioned the classical verb 混ず, which is indeed the etymology of both 混ざる and 混ぜる, but I think it's too advanced to explain about the historical background or the existence of another intransitive verb 混じる and 合わさる.
Oh thank you, that makes so much sense. One last question then, what's the difference in use between 混ざる and 混ざり合う? Don't both mean "to be mixed/blended"?
 

Toritoribe

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The latter has a nuance of "the colors mix up with each other" more strongly because of the function of the second compound verb 合う. (Note that, unlike the passive of transitive 混ぜられる/混ぜ合わされる "to be mixed", the intransitive 混ざる/混ざりあう doesn't suggest the existence of the agent (= the one who mixes the colors). In other words, colors mix up automatically by themselves.)
 
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