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"That time of the month" in japan...

D

DragonChan

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Here's the deal...

I'm participating on this Japan Exchange that my school offers, so I'll be off to Japan next year (I actually have a japanese exchange student staying with me right now. I'd ask her this, but her english isn't all that good, and she's really shy.)

But that's not the point. My question is, I having people tell me to stock up on tampons and pads before I head over for the year, since it's different in Japan. What I want to know is, what do they do in Japan then? Whenever I ask people they just say it's 'different.' Is there a woman who's lived in japan for a while that can tell me what the deal is over there before I donate a suitcase to feminine hygene?

-DC
PS: Sorry if this topic makes anybody uncomfortable ^^;;
 
Hi there :)
I was the same as you, when I first when to Japan on an exchange I brought 3 months supply with me LOL!

Now I am living in Japan and actually it's not too difficult to find what you want. Apparently women prefer pads here, but I've had no problem finding tampons.
If you're quite fussy about what you prefer I'd bring some with you, at least the first month or two until you have had time to look around and find something similar.

In my experience I believe you'll have no problem, I haven't lived everywhere in Japan, but I do live in a small town and it's been fine.

Congratulations on your trip - it's a wonderful experience!! Where are you going? I first went to Kobe, but now live in the bottom of Kyushu.
 
Thanks for the info. I was so confused since all I kept hearing was 'it's different.' That puts everything in perspective. I guess I'll have to bring some supplies until I can find some tampons...it's impossible to do sports in anything else 😌

I'm going to a place called 'Konan City' from what I gather it's a small city somewhere between Nagoya and Kyoto...(not sure which one it's closer to.) I'm a little nervous about the trip. I've been to the place once before for five days last year, and I must say I stick out quite a bit in Japan.

My friends and I think I should bring as many 'unusual' but tasteful clothes to Japan as I can. I figure I'll already stick out a ton as a blue/green-eyed blond, why not stick out a little more? It's not like I'll do anything outragous. Just bring some flare jeans, cool shirts, and some chains for my jeans ^_^
 
DragonChan! You're going to Konan?! That's where my husband is from! This is the first time I've ever heard of anybody going to Konan! Wow!

Anyway, let us know if you need to know anything about it. My husband lived there all his life! I'm sure he'd be interested in knowing somebody is going there.
 
Yay! Somebody who's heard of where I'm going!

My school has a sister school in Konan, that's why I'm going there in particular. The school is called 'Bihoku', has your husband heard of it?

I don't think I need too much info on the place at the moment, since I did go there for about 5 days in October. It wasn't enough time to get a good impression, but I have a faint idea of what life might be like.

Thank you!
-DC
 
If you buy anything like Towels , tampons , condoms in japan .. they put it in a non-transparent bag at teh counter. even if you buy them with your grocery shopping , they get bagged seperate. Ah .. i'll never know.:p
 
SalaryMan - LOL! I wonder why they do that? Do they have some sort of facination with embarressing people horribly =P ?
 
DragonChan, I asked my husband about that high school and he knew it well. It is very close to his parents' house. I was right, he was very interested in knowing someone was going to be an exchange student in Konan... ;)
 
Originally posted by DragonChan
SalaryMan - LOL! I wonder why they do that? Do they have some sort of facination with embarressing people horribly =P ?

Don't worry Dragonchan, it might only be where Salary man lives. The shop where I go doesn't do that. The shop is called "No. 1" and when I told my friends another meaning for that in English they all thought it was amusing ;)
Another supermarket I go to is called "sankyu" - thank you- and the liqour shop next door is called "bery muchi" - very much!
LOL :D
 
nzueda - that's reassuring. I can't beleive a store would do that...kinda cruel if you ask me.

Those store names are funny. I'll have to make a list of things like that when I go to share with all of you when I get back. I swear we could all be eternally amused simply by reading Engrish...
 
Originally posted by DragonChan
SalaryMan - LOL! I wonder why they do that? Do they have some sort of facination with embarressing people horribly =P ?
And what's embarrassing about a non-transparent bag? You can probably just stuff it inside a regular one or even take your own tote bag to the grocery for bagging as part of a recycling campaign. 😄
 
Blue Day ???

When I first heard my girlfriend tell me it was "Blue Day" it took me a week to get a friend to explain. I wondered why she was sad? Do women still call it that ?
 
One of my Japanese friends told me that when she started "that monthly thing" for the first time, her mother made "red" rice to give to everybody in celebration. She said she was terribly embarassed. If my mom had done that to me...well, let's just say I wouldn't have liked it very much... :devilish:
 
And someday they may be entirely a thing of the past.....


FDA Approves New Birth-Control Pill
Sat Sep 6, 9:49 AM ET Add Health - AP to My Yahoo!


By LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON - A new birth-control pill named Seasonale promises to reduce the frequency of women's periods, from every month to four times a year.

The contraceptive pills, approved by the Food and Drug Administration (news - web sites) on Friday, aren't a new chemical. They contain the same combination of low-dose estrogen and progestin found in many oral contraceptives.

Nor is the idea of menstrual suppression new. For decades, many doctors have told women how to skip a period by continually taking the active birth-control pills in each month's supply and ignoring the week of dummy pills in each packet.

Seasonale promises to make the option a little more convenient, with packaging that gives women 12 straight weeks of active pills and then a week of dummy pills for their period. And the FDA's approval means menstrual suppression could become more common as Seasonale's advertising alerts women to the option.

Seasonale isn't perfect, the FDA cautioned.

While women have fewer scheduled periods, studies show Seasonale users have about twice the risk of unexpected "breakthrough" bleeding between periods as woman taking conventional monthly cycle pills, especially in the first few cycles of use.

Also, 7.7 percent of Seasonale users dropped out of studies citing unacceptable bleeding, compared with 1.8 percent of women taking conventional monthly pills.

While the risk of breakthrough bleeding declines with each cycle of Seasonale use, FDA said some women had it so often that their total days of bleeding over a year were no less than with regular pills.

"Each woman will respond to this product somewhat differently," said FDA's Dr. Scott Monroe. "Some will find they respond entirely as the product was designed to function, and others will have increased intermenstrual bleeding to the extent that they choose not to continue with the product."

The manufacturer, Barr Laboratories, plans to have prescription-only Seasonale in pharmacies by November. Barr wouldn't reveal Seasonale's price but said it will be comparable to other brand-name oral contraceptives, which sell for roughly $1 a pill. Generic versions can cost half that amount.

Having fewer periods "was absolutely fabulous," said Shannon Zaichenko, 27, of Chesapeake, Va., who spent three years in a study of Seasonale.

"It's the convenience, not being bogged down, not having to plan vacations or just lifestyle around seven days of bleeding," she said. A frequent traveler, Zaichenko recalled that before Seasonale her periods "always seemed to happen when I was on a plane for 20 hours."

Seasonale also may be attractive to women who experience severe cramping, heavy bleeding and other menstrual-related symptoms, a number Barr estimates at 2.5 million in the United States.

But the National Women's Health Network says some Seasonale proponents falsely imply that limiting menstruation is generally healthier, a message the consumer group calls particularly unwise for young girls.

"We already have a lot of shame and stigma in this society about menstruation," said the network's Cynthia Pearson, who has asked Barr to ensure that Seasonale ads don't convey that impression.

During the menstrual cycle, fluctuations in estrogen signal the uterine lining, or endometrium, to thicken in preparation for nourishing an embryo. If pregnancy doesn't occur, the excess lining is sloughed off, accompanied by bleeding.

The big safety question is whether four periods a year are enough to allow the uterus to shed any tissue that builds up.

A study by Eastern Virginia Medical School, which developed the three-month pill regimen, shows they are. It tracked 682 women taking either Seasonale or regular monthly pills for a year. Seasonale proved equally effective at preventing pregnancy. Side effects, too, were similar, with the exception of breakthrough bleeding.

"There is no concern in delaying the period for three months," says Dr. Vanessa Cullins of Planned Parenthood (news - web sites).

In fact, she noted, women today have far more periods in their lifetime than their ancestors before the era of contraception, when women spent much more time either pregnant or breast-feeding, both of which block menstruation.

Not every woman will be comfortable with Seasonale, Cullins said 窶 monthly bleeding gives some contraceptive users added reassurance that they're not pregnant.
 
I think so too. For me, taking something that is going to stop a natural process such as that couldn't be too healthy. I was having some problems awhile back, and my doctor told me I could take go back on the Pill, and without taking the placebo, be absent from having a period at all. He even mentioned hysterectomy to me too. I sure wasn't that desperate. But that's just me. I sometimes think that by getting a tubal ligation I made a huge mistake. It seems a lot of problems started after that. Problems that I never had before.
 
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