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Teaching w/o Visa

MilesOfSmiles

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I read online that lots of foreigners teach English in Japan for the 3-month, Visa-free, tourism period.
This sounds appealing to me, as it would be chance to be "immersed" during my stay and have some purpose, and income.

Does anyone know where to find job postings for such things?

Thanks! :)
 

IndieDevM

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I think that would be volunteer jobs only. Any form of paid work would surely have to be a work or working holiday visa.
 

MilesOfSmiles

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I think that would be volunteer jobs only. Any form of paid work would surely have to be a work or working holiday visa.
Thank you, very helpful! But what is a "working holiday visa"?
Also, are there any schools that would sponsor a working visa for a potential employee that doesn't have a college degree?
 

Mike Cash

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Thank you, very helpful! But what is a "working holiday visa"?
As an American you aren't eligible for one.

Also, are there any schools that would sponsor a working visa for a potential employee that doesn't have a college degree?
No. You don't meet the Immigration requirements for a working visa to teach English.
 

MilesOfSmiles

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As an American you aren't eligible for one.
No. You don't meet the Immigration requirements for a working visa to teach English.
Thank you.
I see, guess it's time to get on board the college degree train...
 

Mike Cash

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Thank you.
I see, guess it's time to get on board the college degree train...
Or to consider other options, if any. What sort of professional skills, experience, and/or qualifications do you have? There are cases of professionals in some fields qualifying for visas based on professional experience.
 

MilesOfSmiles

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I'm an entrepreneurial marketing professional.

I simultaneously ran a marketing company while spending 10 years in retail sales with Apple, Verizon, and in a restaurant I owned and operated. I now work exclusively on marketing strategy and presentations for start-up businesses.

My resume looks like the adventures of Marco Polo.

Not exactly the kind of pedigree and consistency the Japanese prize I'd dare say.
 

MilesOfSmiles

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Or to consider other options, if any. What sort of professional skills, experience, and/or qualifications do you have? There are cases of professionals in some fields qualifying for visas based on professional experience.
Are you saying that if my experience applied to the job I was looking at there might be an exception in the Visa sponsorship process? That the degree requirement is sometimes negotiable?

Thank you, I really do appreciate your help!
 

Mike Cash

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Are you saying that if my experience applied to the job I was looking at there might be an exception in the Visa sponsorship process? That the degree requirement is sometimes negotiable?

Thank you, I really do appreciate your help!
No, I'm saying there are certain fields for which experience is accepted as a substitute for education. I can't say for certain but I doubt anything you described would fall under that heading as they tend to be for more technically oriented fields. We get quite a few people coming through who want to get experience on the phones at a customer service call center or years of running a cash register at their local supermarket to qualify them for a working visa in Japan but I have never heard of it working out for them.
 

johnnyG

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I'm an entrepreneurial marketing professional.

I simultaneously ran a marketing company while spending 10 years in retail sales with Apple, Verizon, and in a restaurant I owned and operated. I now work exclusively on marketing strategy and presentations for start-up businesses.

My resume looks like the adventures of Marco Polo.

Not exactly the kind of pedigree and consistency the Japanese prize I'd dare say.
IMO you'd be wasting yourself in any kind of ESL work.
 

MilesOfSmiles

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IMO you'd be wasting yourself in any kind of ESL work.
Thanks to everyone who chimed in on this, answered a lot of long held questions I had.
Gotta say I LOVE how honest everyone is on this forum! Thx!
 

Glenski

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You're welcome. You might be surprised how many people feel the opposite about our honesty and instead believe intensely that there are loopholes that will get them here. It's frustrating.
 

cocoichi

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I read online that lots of foreigners teach English in Japan for the 3-month, Visa-free, tourism period.
This sounds appealing to me, as it would be chance to be "immersed" during my stay and have some purpose, and income.

Does anyone know where to find job postings for such things?

Thanks! :)
From your opening post I get that you are already going to Japan, regardless of finding English teaching work. Am I right?
I dare to say that you can earn money on the side teaching English. Lots of foreign students that I have met during my days in Japan posted ads in the typical magazines and online, saying they would do private tutoring for 1000-2000 yen per hour. Usually they met with people at a coffee cafe.

It won't make you enough to live off, but it might be enough to cover food expenses.
 

Glenski

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I dare to say that you can earn money on the side teaching English. Lots of foreign students that I have met during my days in Japan posted ads in the typical magazines and online, saying they would do private tutoring for 1000-2000 yen per hour. Usually they met with people at a coffee cafe.

It won't make you enough to live off, but it might be enough to cover food expenses.
What do you think MilesofSmiles is going to do to find clients? And, collecting any fees without a proper visa is illegal as hell. You may never get caught, but why risk it? Personally, I think you overestimate his chances of finding people to tutor.

This may rub you wrong, but think of it from the standpoint of someone who is actually in the teaching business!
 

cocoichi

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What do you think MilesofSmiles is going to do to find clients? And, collecting any fees without a proper visa is illegal as hell. You may never get caught, but why risk it? Personally, I think you overestimate his chances of finding people to tutor.

This may rub you wrong, but think of it from the standpoint of someone who is actually in the teaching business!
What do you think MilesofSmiles is going to do to find clients? And, collecting any fees without a proper visa is illegal as hell. You may never get caught, but why risk it? Personally, I think you overestimate his chances of finding people to tutor.

This may rub you wrong, but think of it from the standpoint of someone who is actually in the teaching business!
I respectfully disagree with the chances. If not looking for a sustainable income, there are enough opportunities. I've been approached at least once a month by a salaryman type if I could be his conversation partner in exchange for money. Sometimes someone approached me on the street, but sometimes also after striking up a conversation in a bar
Then, if you consider all the advertisement possibilities you have in 2016 (social media, forum ads, ads in magazines like metropolis, some dedicated language teaching sites/magazines). Plus maybe MOS has Japanese friends that can help him through referral. I'd say enough to make some money on the side, for food or transport. MOS would have to be in one place for a considerable amount of time though.

You don't rub me wrong, I can very much relate to your point of view. However I think that the people who want to spend an occasional 2000 yen on a casual conversation lesson, are going for a different experience than those who take a couple of lessons weekly and need it to progress in life/work. I think the meeting foreign people part here is more important than the language training.

Talking about illegality: the people that do have a proper visa and which offer conversation lessons in starbucks by going through a newspaper. Do they report their taxes properly? I have a feeling most of them keep that sort of income under the table.
 
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