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Steak restaurant

kirkwood91

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I have a question about English sentence.

We were talking about a new steak restaurant chain in the internet.

And I wanted to ask other person if he actually went to the restraunt and taste a beef steak.

In this context, can I say, “Have you ever tried to taste the beef in person?”

If it sounds award, please correct the sentence.

Thank you very much.
 

Lothor

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'Have you ever been to the restaurant to try the steak?'
or
'Have you ever had steak at the restaurant?'
would be better.
 

mdchachi

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You've already established the context so I don't think you need to say "at the restaurant."
Also usually "steak" by itself means beef so you don't really need to specify "beef steak."
Therefore I suggest "Have you ever tried the steak in person?" or to be more specific you could say "Have you ever tried ChainName's steak in person?"
 

Lothor

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You've already established the context so I don't think you need to say "at the restaurant."
Also usually "steak" by itself means beef so you don't really need to specify "beef steak."
Therefore I suggest "Have you ever tried the steak in person?" or to be more specific you could say "Have you ever tried ChainName's steak in person?"
I think you also don't need to say 'in person' :emoji_relaxed:
 

nice gaijin

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"have you tried/tasted their steak?" if you've been talking about the restaurant, so the listener would understand whose steak you're talking about.

alternatively: "have you tried restaurant name's steak?" or "have you tried the steak at restaurant name" works. You could optionally add "yourself" to the end of either sentence, which doesn't really change the meaning but reinforces the question of whether they have firsthand experience (slightly more interrogative).

In the same vein, the use of "ever" has a sound of incredulity to it, like you think they're talking about something they haven't actually experienced. If you started off the conversation with "have you ever tried matsuzaka-gyu," it wouldn't have this connotation, but if you had been talking about a particular wagyu restaurant and you asked "have you ever been there/have you ever tried their beef?" It would sound like you expected the answer was "no."
 
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