What's new

Welcome to Japan Reference (JREF) - the community for all Things Japanese.

Join Today! It is fast, simple, and FREE!

// Shopping in Tokyo \\

kidtokyo

Tokyo 9/16/07
Joined
10 Jun 2002
Messages
53
Reaction score
0
Hello everyone! As I've mentioned before, I'm heading to Tokyo next month for a short trip. I won't have too much money to spend, so I want to use each dollar/yen to its fullest. (btw, I'm residing in the Shinjuku area, but can take suggestions for all of Tokyo)

Things I'm wondering:

- I know things are expensive in Japan, but are there any particular items that are significantly cheaper than ones bought in the U.S. or other countries? I wouldn't mind buying some cool Japanese toys and clothing.. but not if they cost as much as if I were to import them from the internet. On the contrary, are there any items that are notoriously expensive?

- Are there do's and don'ts regarding shopping, in terms of where to find deals, and where you'll see over-priced things? Right now I live in one of the largest tourist destinations in the world (Orlando), and the shopping areas that seem to draw the tourists are oftentimes not where the deals are.

- When shopping, is everything clearly priced, or do they only tell you the price when you ask (therefore potentially ripping off unsuspecting people)?


Any other tips or links to good shopping guides would be great!

Thanks! :47::47::47::47::47::47::47::47::47::47::47:
 

ArmandV

Eight Times To Japan
Contributor
Joined
18 Oct 2004
Messages
2,398
Reaction score
106
There's a toy store in Asakusa near Nakamise Street that is reasonable. It is next door to a McDonalds. This is it:

Asakusa_Toy_Shop.jpg
 
Last edited:

jurek1810

先輩
Joined
9 Aug 2007
Messages
52
Reaction score
0
👍I never been in Japan, but from Discovery Chanell I know where people like we may bought some original things like samurai sword, kimono, sea foods ( fishes, fruits of the sea etc....). But I know that sometimes, with somebody (probably with my wife) I visit Japan, bought some things, and make photographs of trees, landscapes, beautiful buldings, mountains etc... . Then I' ll be very proud of me🙂:)http--e.pudelek.pl-p1875-98bb0181000dc5ac46b49219= oczko


Jurek1810
 

tigermilk

先輩
Joined
12 Aug 2005
Messages
95
Reaction score
2
For prices, they are marked either directly on the merchandise or on the shelf. They are marked with the 5% tax included. You shouldn't have any trouble.

You can find some pretty cheap stuff at Asakusa. And I wouldn't say things are expensive in Japan. For daily goods the prices are near what I'm used to in the states. If you want cheap clothes, head down to Harajuku where you can get shirts for 500 yen and up. Or Uniqlo (many locations around Japan) has abundant cheap clothes. A place popular with tourists is Oriental Bazaar - http://www.frommers.com/destinations/tokyo/S27115.html. Personally I'm not a big fan of the place. The stuff is cheap, but the quality isn't to my standards. I prefer to get gifts at department stores like Mitsukoshi or Takashimaya.
 

SushiShin

後輩
Joined
15 Jan 2007
Messages
1,952
Reaction score
18
let me give you a good advice, write on a paper what you really want google it and then search and after that you compare the price and you go buy whatevr you want, (i will soon leave a post with shops for you okay?)
 

Nisei88

Irregular Member
Joined
29 May 2007
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Are you planning to go to a Mandrake store? They have a lot of those gum ball vending machines with toys in them.

There are also 99yen stores and Don Quxionte (like a 99yen) stores.

Remember, in Japan put you money on the tray vs. handing it directly to a person.
 

ArmandV

Eight Times To Japan
Contributor
Joined
18 Oct 2004
Messages
2,398
Reaction score
106
Are you planning to go to a Mandrake store? They have a lot of those gum ball vending machines with toys in them.

The Mandarake store(s) to go to is in the Broadway Mall near Nakano station. They are on the 2nd/3rd floors and have several stores specializing in different things. I collect kaiju vinyls and I found more in Asakusa than at Mandarake the last two trips. There's also other toy stores there. One is Robot Robot (I think that's the name).
 

BlueThunderKuno

Baseball Samurai
Joined
3 Jul 2007
Messages
111
Reaction score
1
Remember, in Japan put you money on the tray vs. handing it directly to a person.

I never knew this. I am trying to brush up on a lot of Japanese styles and Japanese customs. I am making myself a little book, and I will study it on the plane.
 

ArmandV

Eight Times To Japan
Contributor
Joined
18 Oct 2004
Messages
2,398
Reaction score
106
I never knew this. I am trying to brush up on a lot of Japanese styles and Japanese customs. I am making myself a little book, and I will study it on the plane.

It is not difficult to remember, a lot of them will put the tray before you or just motion you to put your cash on the tray.
 

pipokun

先輩
Joined
4 Feb 2005
Messages
2,355
Reaction score
46
are there any items that are notoriously expensive?
I think books are expensive for shipping cost.
Buy "point and speak phrase book" soon after you arrive at Narita, and you can enjoy your trip more.
http://www.yubisashi.com/books/detail.asp?id=727

And it is an idea to go to Don Quijote Shinjuku Higashiguchi Honten, a discount store, and you can find everything from cheap snacks to joke goods like weird high school uniforms.
Open Hours: open for 24 hours
Holiday: none
http://www.donki.com/c/shop/shop_en.php?lang=en&shopid=29

is everything clearly priced
Yes.
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
15 Mar 2002
Messages
16,455
Reaction score
2,255
It is not difficult to remember, a lot of them will put the tray before you or just motion you to put your cash on the tray.

Unless handing over a fistful of coins, I have always made it a practice to put the money into the clerk's hand.

There is no societal rule requiring one to make use of the tray and its use tends to be more common the higher the amount of money changing hands.

I also like having my change placed into my hand and not slid to me on a tray.

He didn't know what it was to be black
Until they gave him his change
But didn't want to touch his hand

Sade


I like human-to-human contact. Something we could use more of in the world in general and this country in particular.
 

undrentide

Japa'n vagyok
Joined
18 Jan 2006
Messages
3,621
Reaction score
308
In most places prices are shown clearly (including 5% tax), so you don't have to worry that you might get ripped-off. ;-)

I'd like to recommend to visit Omotesando - Harajuku.
Take Tokyo Metro (either Ginza line, Chiyoda line or Hanzomon line) and get off at Omotesando Station (A red mark on the map).
Walk along the street towards Harajuku - if you go out of the metro station, you'll be at a very big crossing with two gigantic stone lantarn and matured trees are lining on the both sides of the street. Go along this street.

On your right a new shopping mall called Omotesando Hills. You'll find many posh shops though they are very much pricy. There are many brand shops such as Dior, Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Fendi, Armani, just for example.

Go along the street and after 10-15 min walk, you'll find Oriental Bazar (the green arrow on the map, the one not very far from the red dot), with very distinctive shop with Japanese-like (not really) tiled roof and red columns. You'll find many traditional (and not so traditional) Japanese things, they carry a wide range of goods. Even just looking at the goods is fun, even for Japanese people! :)

Not very far from Oriental Bazar, there's a famous toy shop called Harajuku Kiddy Land (A on the map). There are many cute goods.
Again, walk along the street, then you'll reach a stone bridge over railways and Harajuku station of JR line. (The blue dot on the map.)
It is where you can see some young people in very interesting costumes on weekends. (If you have enough time, go across the bridge and then you can visit Meiji Shrine (the green part on the left of the map.) It is like a small forest, once you go into it, you cannot believe you're in the middle of the city!)

Turn right and go down the sloping road, and turn right again at the first corner (the yellow dot) and go into the narrow, crowded street. It is called Takeshita doori (Takeshita street) where there are hundreds of small shops selling inexpensive stuff. On your left you'll find Daiso, one of the famous 100Yen shop (to be exact, everything is 105 Yen because of 5% tax...)(Another green arrow near the yellow dot.)
They have 3 floors plus one basement, and you can buy almost anything from food to cosmetics, stationery, DIY tools, ornaments, party goods, gardening goods, etc. at JPY100/each. Only a few items are sold at JPY200, 300 or 500 but they are clearly marked.

Have a great time in Tokyo, and enjoy shopping! 🙂
 

Attachments

  • map.jpg
    map.jpg
    150.2 KB · Views: 55

budd

先輩
Joined
10 Jul 2003
Messages
2,013
Reaction score
18
"I won't have too much money to spend, so I want to use each dollar/yen to its fullest. (btw, I'm residing in the Shinjuku area, but can take suggestions for all of Tokyo)"

ikebukoro.
 

Homerduff

ケビン
Joined
2 Jan 2007
Messages
365
Reaction score
9
First of all, prices in Japan aren't that high as you may think (except if you are planning to visit clubs in Shibuya or any other busy place). That is my personal opinion. Also the fact that the currency of the euro has never been bether than now.

You can buy some nice souvenirs pretty cheap at Asakusa's Nakamise arcade. I bought a nice geisha doll for only 2000 yen there. Another good place for souvenirs is in Akihabara's Yodobashi (located right next to the station). I bought some large scroll-type drapes there with beautiful drawings of japan for only 300 yen each. At Yodobashi and any other stores in Akihabara, most things are definetly cheaper over there then in the US. Some other very cheap souvenirs is manga, even if you aren't really a fan of it (like me), its really good reading practise material cause it has furigana. And some books are priced only 105 yen ! You often see bookstores at any station. If you are into gaming and you want to make a really nice deal, then you could buy a PSP or Nintendo DS. I forgot the price but I do know that many of my classmates bought one (or even 2) while being in Japan.

I also recommend you to go to the UT store in Harajuku where they sell 'bottle t-shirts'. its only 1500 yen for a t-shirt and they have some great designs there plus its a pretty cool store.

Not everything is priced that clearly actually but you shouldn't worry about getting ripped-off. just ask any employee at the shop.

Have fun, can't wait to go back myself. Still got to wait till March..
 
Joined
18 Jan 2005
Messages
10,288
Reaction score
702
A cheap toy store.
The toy store which I know is cheaper than other toy stores.
About 10% - 30% are cheap.
A place :
Koenji Station of JR Chuo Line
(It is the next station of Nakano Station from Shinjuku direction),
The left of a rotary of north exit.
"BOUYA"
🙂
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
15 Mar 2002
Messages
16,455
Reaction score
2,255
"I won't have too much money to spend, so I want to use each dollar/yen to its fullest. (btw, I'm residing in the Shinjuku area, but can take suggestions for all of Tokyo)"
ikebukoro.

Four years and almost 2000 posts later and we still can't get you to learn how to use quote tags......
 
Top Bottom