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Sayounara in kanji

lizmoran

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Need a .jpg (or any image file) of the symbol for sayonara in KANJI!!! PLEASE!!! (have had almost no luck in searches, and computer does not read Japanese/Kanji unless it is in an image
 

NANGI

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Konnichiwa lizmoran-san!

Usually, "Sayounara" or "Sayonara" is written in Hiragana. And there is not Kanji now. But old days, "Sayonara" was written in Kanji and Hiragana.
"Saraba" is a old word of "Sayonara" and was written in Kanji and Hiragana too. But usually Japanese people don't use this word "Saraba" in daily life now.

But I think that you should not use "Sayonara" in Kanji and Hiragana. Because tha Japanese don't use "Sayonara" in Kanji and Hiragana now.

NANGI
 

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Elizabeth

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One rule of use for "sayounara" I came across on the internet said that Japanese only use "sayonara" nowadays on very formal occasions --such as couples breaking up or to people leaving forever. Is that true? I use it on the phone all the time....:p
 

kirei_na_me

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That's what I was told too, Elizabeth. I used to say it sometimes, but then my husband told me that no one ever uses that for everyday use(pardon moi, s'il vous plait :p). I have often wondered how that became so popular in the West. Was the term kind of romanticized somehow during/after WWII or what? Or before then? Anyway...
 

Elizabeth

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Actually, I pretty much just use with my tutor because she always does. No doubt having become too Americanized....;).
 

mdchachi

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That's true. It's not something you would normally use to say goodbye unless a long separation is expected. On the phone if you're being casual you'd probably say "jaa ne" or "jaa, mata ne". If you're being a little more formal you might say something like "oisogashii tokoro sumimasendeshita... sore de ha, shitsurei shimasu..."
 

Andy

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From what I have experienced in Japan people use sayonara when taking to kids or Gaijins, (there's a link there I think...) But jaa mata and jaa ne seem to be used more commonly with adults
 

Elizabeth

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Originally posted by Andy
From what I have experienced in Japan people use sayonara when taking to kids or Gaijins, (there's a link there I think...) But jaa mata and jaa ne seem to be used more commonly with adults
Yes, we use those too. It's just that there is something particularly pleasant sounding to foreign ears about all it leading into and ending with "sayounara" -- maybe since the final "ra" can be extended and elevated in pitch, I'm not sure.
 
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