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-sare, sentence. Can someone explain?

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Hi everyone, I haven't been here for a few weeks. I'm right at the end of Minna no Nihongo, chapter 49 and I've come across something I don't understand. In a reading exercise the sentence reads (sorry, I'm at work and I don't have Kanji installed on this PC)...
Toukyou daigaku o sotsugyousare, ooku no bungaku sakuhin o okaki ni narimashita.
He graduated Tokyo University, and came to write many works of literature.
But I don't understand the "sotsugyou-sare" ending. It's before a comma so it seems to me it should either be -sarete, or -sarimashite, a -te ending. I can't think of how it becomes a -sare, ending??
Can anyone explain it to me? Many thanks.
 

Mikawa Ossan

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You are absolutely correct. It is a somewhat shortened version of sarete, which in this case is the "passive voice used to express politeness towards the subject of the sentence."

This writing convention, where they shorten -te forms of verbs is actually quite common, although it's a little strange at first.

Good luck!
 

nice gaijin

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it's common in (more formal) writing to link clauses using the stem form of a verb before the comma, the effect is the same as if you were to use the te form in speech.
 
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Ah, as simple as that. The grammar part of Minna no Nihongo mentioned the -mashite form but made no mention of stems so when they used it in the text I was confused. That's great, thanks for clearing that up, I will sleep peacefully. :)
 
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