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Question on the function of きた

Green;Dog

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I was in Japan a few days ago and bought a copy of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep because it's one of my favorites.

The first sentence:
ベッドわきのムードオルガンから、アラームが送ってきた陽気な弱いサージ電流で、リック デッカードは目をさました。

Narrowing it down to the part in question:
アラームが 送ってきた
araamu ga okutte kita

I'm not clear on the function of kita in this context. I've read that any verb with kuru on the end says that the thing is doing and coming back. So the alarm is coming back? Or does it serve a different function? It wouldn't make much sense for it to come back. What am I missing contextually here?

I'm comparing it to the source material:
A merry little surge of electricity piped by automatic alarm from the mood organ beside his bed awakened Rick Deckard.

I feel like what confuses me is an attempt to recreate the wording 'piped by automatic alarm' but I'm more or less looking for confirmation on this and how I should be interpreting the japanese sentence.

Yes I know it's not word for word and yes I understand that the meaning won't be 100% the same, I'm trying to figure out the meaning in the Japanese wording.
 

mdchachi

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I'm not clear on the function of kita in this context. I've read that any verb with kuru on the end says that the thing is doing and coming back. So the alarm is coming back? Or does it serve a different function? It wouldn't make much sense for it to come back. What am I missing contextually here?
In this case I think it's better to just to think of it as one unit i.e. "sent." The alarm sent the surge. Literally you could think of it as "sent and came" I suppose.
If you google the part in question you'll see other examples such as 母が送ってきた野菜 that help clarify how to interpret this word pattern.
 

Toritoribe

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I was in Japan a few days ago and bought a copy of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep because it's one of my favorites.

The first sentence:
ベッドわきのムードオルガンから、アラームが送ってきた陽気な弱いサージ電流で、リック デッカードは目をさました。

Narrowing it down to the part in question:
アラームが 送ってきた
araamu ga okutte kita

I'm not clear on the function of kita in this context. I've read that any verb with kuru on the end says that the thing is doing and coming back. So the alarm is coming back? Or does it serve a different function? It wouldn't make much sense for it to come back. What am I missing contextually here?

I'm comparing it to the source material:
A merry little surge of electricity piped by automatic alarm from the mood organ beside his bed awakened Rick Deckard.

I feel like what confuses me is an attempt to recreate the wording 'piped by automatic alarm' but I'm more or less looking for confirmation on this and how I should be interpreting the japanese sentence.

Yes I know it's not word for word and yes I understand that the meaning won't be 100% the same, I'm trying to figure out the meaning in the Japanese wording.
~てくる indicates the direction of the action/movement "towards the speaker/subject" there. The direction is unclear if it's just アラームが送った, so the destination needs to be mentioned (e.g. 私に送った) to make clear the meaning. 送ってきた can avoid this ambiguity.
 
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