What's new

Question about war in Japanese

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
Messages
16,454
Reaction score
2,233
Neither of those mean "war".

The first is "battlefield" and the second is "here".
 

Andromedashun

先輩
Joined
Jan 3, 2012
Messages
842
Reaction score
9
No you misunderstanding me. I want to know why they are similar like that. Of course I like ''koko de'' more.
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
Messages
16,454
Reaction score
2,233
"Senjo" doesn't mean "war". "Koko de" doesn't mean "war".

"Senjo" means "battlefield".

"Koko de" means "here".

Are you confusing "senjo" and "senso"?

戦場 battlefield

戦争 war

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1417686297.020881.jpg


Where do you get "senjo" and "koko de" mean "war" from that page?
 

nekojita

先輩
Joined
Jan 14, 2009
Messages
1,660
Reaction score
439
友と君と戦場で appears to be a game, where 戦場 has been given the non-standard furigana "ここ"
implying, I suppose, ここは戦場 .

As Mike said, 戦場 is battlefield, not "war".

This is a quite common technique used to add double-meanings. It doesn't mean that ここ means "battlefield" in Japanese more generally. There are a lot of non-standard uses of ruby text, for example it's not that rare to see a made up term in fantasy fiction in kanji, with furigana in katakana, e.g. stuff like 甘毒 furiganaed with スィート・ポイズン . The author wants to use the "cool sounding English" term, but also knows the readers might not get the meaning, hence combining the two.

Another interesting one is where terms in katakana are given ruby kanji "explanations". For example, a crime drama set in the US where Interpol is written インターポール in dialogue but 国際刑事警察機構 is put in ruby text the first time it's introduced. In an Agatha Christie novel in translation I have, more obscure English placenames are transcribed in katakana but then given a little explanation in ruby text. "A town north of London", or something like that. (I will try to dig up a proper quote from that one later).

Basically, ruby text/furigana can be any of:
1) Showing the proper reading (e.g. kanji are difficult for the intended audience, word uses non-standard readings of the kanji)
2) Showing an alternate/made-up reading (often in katakana)
3) Indicating a double meaning (好きな人 furiganed きみ or something) - can overlap with 2).
4) Giving clarifying information for difficult words (particularly foreign words) - like a sort of in-line footnote.
5) Probably some stuff I've missed
 

Andromedashun

先輩
Joined
Jan 3, 2012
Messages
842
Reaction score
9
Are you confusing "senjo" and "senso"?
No you're wrong. I knew senjo. But now I understand. ''Batlefield'' and ''Here'' are similar isn't it?
Thanks everyone.
 

nice gaijin

Resident Realist
Staff member
Moderator
Donor
Joined
Aug 8, 2005
Messages
5,367
Reaction score
566
The words "battlefield" and "here" are about as similar in Japanese as they are in English.

What the game title implies through the characters chosen is that the setting is the battlefield. The furigana imposes an additional meaning to 戦場 by giving it the reading of another word, ここ. I agree with Nekojita that this is saying "here (on the battlefield)," and this is an example of her #3.
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
Messages
16,454
Reaction score
2,233
This is getting annoying.

"Senso" (sensou) 戦争 means "war"

"Senjo" (senjou) 戦場 means "battlefield"

You asked about two words meaning war. NEITHER of the two words you asked about means "war".

Nothing on the page you linked says "senjo" or "koko de" mean "war".

Tell me I'm wrong and misunderstanding again. I really enjoy that.
 

aspenx

後輩
Joined
May 13, 2014
Messages
49
Reaction score
14
TS/OP should have a look at how long strings of Kanji characters are sometimes pronounced in Katakana English. That should get most people confused.

Oh wait, those appear all the time in games. Maybe more games is the answer.

I highly recommend visual novels with the voice overs.
 
Top