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Please check my sentences

SkaKid0911

先輩
3 Jan 2004
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I've been putting sentences together from the words and grammar I know and I was wondering if you guys could just check some of them for me (ill write in romaji and japanese)

Where did your cat go?
Anatano neko doko e desuka
あなたあの猫どこえですか

I am an idiot!
Watashiwa baka desu
私輪馬鹿です

Do you love me?
Anatawa aishiteiru watashi desuka
あなた輪愛している私ですか
(ok that last one i totally guessed on and I just tried because I saw that post about the word love.)

Please could someone correct these for me. Grammar is one of my 2 weaknesses. The other is everything besides grammar!
:)
 
Oh I should make a correction, I messed up the japanese in my first sentence, i think it should be:
あなたの猫どこへですか
 
These are somewhat simplified, but at least grammatically accurate.

Where did your cat go?
Anatano neko doko e desuka
あなたあの猫どこえですか

Where is your cat is probably more natural in Japanese :
Anata no neko wa doko desuka?
or, Anata no neko wa doko ni imasuka?

I am an idiot!
Watashiwa baka desu
私輪(は)馬鹿です

Do you love me?
Anatawa aishiteiru watashi desuka?
あなた輪(this "wa" means ring)は 愛している私ですか

Anata wa watashi wo aishiteimasuka?
 
Yes, in romaji it's your preference (wa/ha), but in kana it is "ha" on the keyboard.

Did you understand the other corrections, though? (e/ni is never used with desu and for yourself as a direct object of love "watashi wo" comes before the verb).

Ganbattene! :)
 
Konnichiwa SkaKid0911-san!

Where did your cat go?
Anatano neko doko e desuka
あなたあの猫どこえですか

Where did your cat go?
Anata no Neko ha(wa) Doko he(e) Itta no desu ka?
あなたの猫は、どこへいったのですか?

Where means "Doko he". In this case, "he" express a direction and is written "へ" in Hiragana but is pronounced "え".
Cat is "Neko".
If it is "you", "Anata" is right. But "your" is "Anata no." and "your cat" is "Anata no Neko".
"go" is "Iku", but this sentence is the past tense. The past tense of "Iku" is a "Itta".
"-desu ka?" means an interrogative sentence.

I am an idiot!
Watashiwa baka desu
私輪馬鹿です

This sentence is the correct, but "輪" means "ring" and "wheel". In this case, "wa" is Hiragana "Ha".

Do you love me?
Anatawa aishiteiru watashi desuka
あなた輪愛している私ですか

Do you love me?
Anata ha Watashi wo Aishite imasu ka?
あなたはわたしを愛していますか?

"You" is "Anata". In this case, "You" is the subject word and is "Anata ha". The following "ha" that next of the subject word is written "は" in Hiragana but is pronounced "わ".
"Love" is a noun "Ai" or a verb "Aishiteiru". An interrogative sentence of "Aishiteiru" is "Aishiteimasuka".
"Me" is "Watashi wo".
Good luck! :)

NANGI
 
Could You Check Mine Too? I just sent this to my friend. I wasn't sure if I use Koban correctly.

こんにちは!お元気ですか。私は超元気です。(^.^) こんばん、しょこさんのたんじょうびです。こちらの人 は二じゃ一さい。

Thanks!
 
Konnichiwa Punk の軍のロッカーsan!

こんにちは! お元気ですか。 私は超元気です。 (^.^) こんばん、しょこさんのたんじょうびです。 こちらの人は二じゃ一さい。

Your sentence is very good, but there is a simple mistake in writing.
I think "二じゃ一さい" means "twenty one years old", but it is "にじゅういっさい(or 二十一歳)" correctly.:note:

And "tonight" is "こんばん" in Japanese. "Koban" means a police box!
:D

NANGI
 
I'm not sure but i believe Konnichiwa (the romaji) messed you up.
You wrote it as こんいちは which is how you would write konnichiwa except for the first N. the two n's together would be written as つに i believe so it would be こつにちわ but i could be wrong. you smarter people, is that right?
 
Konnichiwa SkaKid0911-san!

You have a simple mistake about word "Konnichiwa". First "N" is a absolute word "ん" and next "N" is a part of word "Ni".
You must divide "Konnichiwa" into "Ko", "N", "Ni", "Chi" and "Wa".

"Ko" is "こ".
"N" is "ん".
"Ni" is "に".
"Chi" is "ち".
"Wa" is "わ".

NANGI
 
wait a minute, but i thought that when you have 2 consonants together it meant you pronounce it twice such as our word "bookclub" and you put a small tsu before the consonant sound. I'm confused, could someone clear this up for me (not konnichiwa but this in general)
 
wait a minute, but i thought that when you have 2 consonants together it meant you pronounce it twice such as our word "bookclub" and you put a small tsu before the consonant sound. I'm confused, could someone clear this up for me (not konnichiwa but this in general)

Syllables preceded by a small tsu gain an extra beat. Examples:
いってらっしゃい (itterasshai)
ほっかいどう (Hokkaido)

In itterasshai the 'tte' and 'sshai' can be made by adding on an extra beat to the word, which to some sounds like a sudden stop. And in Hokkaido you would give the 'kka' sound an extra beat.

For listening practice try using these sound files to see the difference between the pronounciation of tsu and usages without tsu: (These are all dates of the month)

tsuitachi (1st)
futsuka (2nd)
mikka (3rd)
yokka (4th)
itsuka (5th)
muika (6th)
nanoka (7th)
youka (8th)
kokonoka (9th)
touka (10th)
juuyokka (14th)
hatsuka (20th)
 
Konnichiwa minna-san

I have also been taught that the "wa" in "konnichiwa" should be the particle "wa (ha)". Can both be used and if so, is the "konnichiwa" with the "wa (not the particle)" more colloquial writing perhaps?
 
Originally posted by LordGus
Konnichiwa minna-san

I have also been taught that the "wa" in "konnichiwa" should be the particle "wa (ha)". Can both be used and if so, is the "konnichiwa" with the "wa (not the particle)" more colloquial writing perhaps?
Yes, it can be both. And the nonparticle wa is more conversational.
 
Originally posted by Elizabeth
What is koban? And what is the last sentence ? ;)

Originally posted by Elizabeth
What is koban? And what is the last sentence ? ;)

oops. I meant to put Konban...that's my mistake there. Thank you Nangi. Since I live in Okinawa, we tend to use Konban to say tonight. :)

As for "二じゃ一さい" I could not find the Kanji for 10 on my AU phone...hehe

I'm still learning Japanese, and finding some Kanji on this phone of mine can be a daunting task. :D

Thanks for your helps guys. :)
 
Konnichiwa Minasan!

about a couple of consonant
Usually, a couple of consonant means small "Tsu" in Hiragana. SacredBlue-san told a good example, いってらっしゃい (Itterasshai). In this word "Itterasshai", couple of "t" and "s" means small "Tsu" in Hiragana.
But if it is a couple of "n" or "vowel word", it dose not mean small "Tsu".

An instance, "Iihouhou"(good idea). It is "いいほうほう" but not "いっほうほう" in Hiragana.
And Konnichiwa is the same, it is "こんにちわ" but not "こんっいちわ".

about Konnichiwa(ha)
In Japanese grammar, "Ha" behind the subject word in Japanese sentence is pronounced "Wa". "Konnichiwa" is a noun and it means a greeting as "hello". Of course "Konnichiwa" is a noun but not the subject word, but "Konnichiha" is the right word in Hiragana but not "Konnichiwa". It is the same as "Konbanwa"(Good evening), "Konbanha" is the right word in Hiragana.
But in roman, I think both of "Konnichiha" and "Konnichiwa" are not mistake, because "Konnichiwa" is easy to understand more than "Konnichiha" and it is in roman but not Hiragana. Wa? Ha? it is not important, the point of greeting is a respect and favor.

But I suggest you "こんにちは" but not "こんにちわ" when you write Hiragana to your Japanese friends. Because "こんにちは" make you look like expert in Japanese.:D

NANGI
 
Thank you, I though all double consonants had tsu's but I didn't realize n was an exception to this rule. Sorry for the confusion.
 
Originally posted by SkaKid0911
Thank you, I though all double consonants had tsu's but I didn't realize n was an exception to this rule. Sorry for the confusion.
In this case because kon and nichi are actually two separate words/kanji こん(今) and (にち)日. Although two 'n's may always run together phonetically, N is actually considered a separate syllable in Japanese, so the you'll only find them in written speech as n + n~ a la "do n na" "mi n na" etc.
 
Ok, thank you. I'd never seen konnichi written in kanji so I didn't know they were 2 different kanji. I just noticed now in my IME if I type konnichiha then i can choose the kanji.
今日は
度もありがとう。(Domo arigatou, I'm not sure if that is the right way.)
 
Yes, Kon is a shortened kono and essentially refers to "this" in a temporal as opposed to spatial sense, so from "this day" -->> "hello/how are you?"
 
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