What's new

Welcome to Japan Reference (JREF) - the community for all Things Japanese.

Join Today! It is fast, simple, and FREE!

Learn Japanese with JapanesePod101.com

Please check my questions for the exam

hirashin

Sempai
Donor
Joined
8 Apr 2004
Messages
2,717
Reaction score
55
Dear native English speakers.

I'd appreciate it if anyone would check my questions for the English examination.

Q1 Pick the suitable word for (1) to (8) from the list below.

Sushi making has its (1) in a (2) of pickling fish that was practiced first in Southeast Asia. Long ago the people of that (3) preserved fish by packing it with rice. As it (4), the rice produced lactic (5), which pickled the fish and kept it from (6). It seems probable that this method of (7) was introduced to Japan (8) ancient times.

(a) fermentedツ (b) originsツ (c) spoilingツ (d) preservationツ 
(e) duringツ (f) regionツ (g) acidツ (h) method


Q2 Check the suitable word in each bracket.

One of the forms it (1)[ eventually even event everything ] took was nare-zushi, a sushi made
(2)[ on in at for with ] carp in the area near Lake Biwa. Only the fish was eaten; the rice was
(3)[ made thrown done consumed ] away.
Preparing nare-zushi can (4)[ make take put do use ] from two months to more than a year. People in fifteenth and sixteenth century Japan (5)[ grew became came put made ] to think this kind of preparation represented a waste of rice. They didn't want to waste such a (6)[ value variety varied valuable vary ] grain, and this led in time to the development of nama-nare or han-nare, which (7)[ nature natures mature matures ] in a few days.

Q3 Change the word order in the bracket to make a correct sentence.
(1) [ツ bothツ fishツ eating ツ andツ ] rice dates from this period.

(2) Vinegar keeps [ bad from fish going ].


Q4 Pick suitable word for (1) to (4) from the list below.

In the mid-seventeenth century, a doctor named Matsumoto Yoshiichi, who lived in Yotsuya, Edo, hit upon the idea of adding su (Japanese vinegar) to sushi rice. The resulting (1) was pleasing, and the waiting time before eating the sushi was substantially (2). Still, it ツ(3) right away. In keeping with the cooking practices of the time, the rice and fish were boxed or rolled up (4) consumption.

(1) (a) sweetness (b) bitterness (c) sourness (d) spiciness

(2) (a) increase (b) increased (c) increasing (d) reduce (e) reduced (f) reducing

(3) (a) is eating (b) is not eating (c) was eating (d) was not eating (e) was eaten
(f) was not eaten (g) has been eaten (h) has not been eaten

(4) (a) in (b) by (c) through (d) before (e) after


Q5 Select the suitable word for each parenthesis from the list below.

(1) the early nineteenth century, nigiri-zushi was born in the city of Edo. It is often referred (2) as Edomae-zushi, possibly because the seafood used was taken (3) the waters of the large bay (4) which the city is situated.

LIST : in on to for from


Q6 Select the suitable word for each parenthesis from the list below.

In 1824 a man named Hanaya Yohei (1) the idea of (2), raw seafood at its freshest (3) on small fingers of (4) rice, an instant (5) on the older sushi dishes. He (6) a stall in the Ryogoku district of Edo and it was (7) a (8).

(a) improvement (b) successツ (c) opened (d) vinegared (e) immediately
ツ (f) conceived (g) sliced (h) served


Q7 Select the correct word from each bracket.

The sushi shops of the Edo period (1603-1868) looked very different (1)[ in on to from ] the ones of today. (窶啣)[ In On For At ] one thing, the cook worked seated behind a screen. Still, there are some similarities. There was often a raised tatami-floored section (窶啌)[ in on for at ] a small number of guests, as there are in some modern shops. Back then also sushi was delivered, but not as it is today. (窶售)[ In On For At ] those days men walked around (窶啜)[ sell selled sold selling ] it from large boxes carried on their backs.


Q8 Translate into Japanese.

(1) The letters at that time looked very little like the ones of today.


(2) Rice is the most important grain for Japanese people.


Q9 Select the sentence in which the underlined word has the same meaning with the one in the original.

(1) It will take two hours to finish this job.
(a) I usually take the bus to work.
(b) What time do you take your son to school?
(c) These things take time.
(d) Are you going to take Japanese this semester?

(2) I have some pain in my back.
(a) Hi. I'm back.
(b) The police asked the crowd to step back.
(c) The thieves came in through the back door.
(d) He injured his back.


That's all.


Thanks in advance

Hirashin
 

Uncle Frank

SECURITY
Admin
Joined
21 May 2003
Messages
11,507
Reaction score
1,395
WOW! Dificult test even for me.

On question #2 part 5 I think both grew and came could be correct.

On question #5 part 3 I think both in and from could be correct.

On question #7 part 1 I think both to and from could be used.

I thought question #9 was very difficult ? I guessed "c" but am not positive that is correct.

poor confused Uncle Frank

:?
 

hirashin

Sempai
Donor
Joined
8 Apr 2004
Messages
2,717
Reaction score
55
Thank you very much for your help, Uncle Frank. I'll reconsider the questions you've pointed out.

Hirashin

---------- Post added at 00:46 ---------- Previous post was at 00:44 ----------

Thank you for trying to help me, Andromedashun. You seem to be a Vietnamese. So you don't have to try to help me. I just want to know how native English speakers use their native language.

Hirashin
 

RickNZ

先輩
Joined
11 Jan 2013
Messages
74
Reaction score
13
Hello, I went through the test, the sentences are natural and for a native speaker the answers are clear and there is nearly always only one correct choice, so I noticed that in Q2 (5) it could be "grew to think" as well as "came to think". Both are allowable but "came" is a lot more common, "grew" is more literary.

I found Q6 a bit hard at first because I don't know the food dish that you're describing. I guess a Japanese person would be famliar with it! But once I figured out how to place "sliced" and "vinegared" it all made sense.

Q7 (1) "from" and "to" are equally common these days, although "from" is technically more correct. Myself, I usually say "different to" when speaking aloud because it's easier to say, but I usually write "different from". Incidentally, "different than" seems to be allowable in American English, but sounds awkward elsewhere. The reasoning is due to "differ"'s origins as a Latin verb meaning "to separate", so the preposition should be one of physical distance, i.e. it makes sense to say "separated from...", not much sense to say "separated to ", and no sense at all to say "separated than" :)

Q9 (1) is a great question, the different meaning is subtle, I had to think about it a bit.
 
Last edited:

hirashin

Sempai
Donor
Joined
8 Apr 2004
Messages
2,717
Reaction score
55
Thank you very much for your help, Nick. I appreciate it.

Q9 (1) may not be so difficult for Japanese learners of English.
How interesting!

Hirashin
 
Top Bottom