What's new

Welcome to Japan Reference (JREF) - the community for all Things Japanese.

Join Today! It is fast, simple, and FREE!

Planning to join University.

Secerbus

後輩
Joined
19 Sep 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
Hey guys.
27 years old, male, Swedish, 6.5 years experience in IT, no degree.
Looking to get to Japan to work, and as such I've been looking at Universities. I've never been to one and think it could be an amazing experience.

So far I've considered either Liberal arts/Japanese Studies/Engineering. Engineering being the obvious choice, it doesn't start until October 2018, while the rest start April and are at some pretty fancy Universities.

Say that I get a Japanese studies/Liberal arts degree at Meiji/Sophia or Uni of equal rank, what are my prospects of getting a TECH job after graduating? I would be drawing on my experience obviously rather than my degree. The degree being mostly to satisfy visa requirements as I understand it.

Also, will I have a good time at all at 27-28 when starting University? I'd be older than the average for sure. But how would that affect me socializing with the rest of the students? Not sure how Japan society would handle something like that.

Thanks!
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
15 Mar 2002
Messages
16,455
Reaction score
2,255
Are you looking at schools where the course is taught in English? Or in Japanese?

If you're looking for a tech job, i would think a tech degree would be the most beneficial.
 

Secerbus

後輩
Joined
19 Sep 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
Are you looking at schools where the course is taught in English? Or in Japanese?

If you're looking for a tech job, i would think a tech degree would be the most beneficial.

English taught. Correct, mentioned that above.
 

Glenski

Just me
Joined
20 Aug 2003
Messages
4,808
Reaction score
405
Why even bother trying to get in to a foreign university? Wouldn't it be easier and cheaper to attend one where you live? Which uni have you selected for engineering here that starts in October 2018?
 

Secerbus

後輩
Joined
19 Sep 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
Why even bother trying to get in to a foreign university? Wouldn't it be easier and cheaper to attend one where you live? Which uni have you selected for engineering here that starts in October 2018?

Yes would be much better financially, as University in Sweden is free. However for personal reasons I am not staying in the country any more, so going here is a no-go.

Kyuushu, Osaka, Nagoya, Sophia, Meiji
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
15 Mar 2002
Messages
16,455
Reaction score
2,255
Forgive a silly question, but do you plan to learn Japanese?
 

Secerbus

後輩
Joined
19 Sep 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
Forgive a silly question, but do you plan to learn Japanese?
Yes I've self studied it for 9 months at this point and applied to some University run japanese courses (Keio, Waseda) plus a language school as a safe bet if none of the applications go through.
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
15 Mar 2002
Messages
16,455
Reaction score
2,255
Yes I've self studied it for 9 months at this point and applied to some University run japanese courses (Keio, Waseda) plus a language school as a safe bet if none of the applications go through.

That's good. The reason I ask is that people sometimes have a very mistaken idea that they can get by with just English in Japan and because many tech jobs will require JLPT N1 or at least N2. You would also make yourself more competitive in the job market if you acquire some of the technical qualifications/certifications which are specific to Japan (the tests are in Japanese).
 

Secerbus

後輩
Joined
19 Sep 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
That's good. The reason I ask is that people sometimes have a very mistaken idea that they can get by with just English in Japan and because many tech jobs will require JLPT N1 or at least N2. You would also make yourself more competitive in the job market if you acquire some of the technical qualifications/certifications which are specific to Japan (the tests are in Japanese).

This Ive looked up, i checked the immigration law. From what I've seen the safe bet is a degree in engineering. However even one in something like Liberal arts should be OK if you concider 6.5 years of experience in the field and ~N2 fluency after 4 years.

I've heard of people abroad getting engineer visas with non-engineer degrees so should be OK.
 

Secerbus

後輩
Joined
19 Sep 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
That's good. The reason I ask is that people sometimes have a very mistaken idea that they can get by with just English in Japan and because many tech jobs will require JLPT N1 or at least N2. You would also make yourself more competitive in the job market if you acquire some of the technical qualifications/certifications which are specific to Japan (the tests are in Japanese).

Oh btw, might be nice to know. There's a test called the ITPEC test, can be taken in English in the Philippines. Hard as nails but if you pass it, you don't need the 4 year degree/10 year experience rule that the immigration require.
 

Glenski

Just me
Joined
20 Aug 2003
Messages
4,808
Reaction score
405
What does the ITPEC test have to do with getting into a Japanese university? I work at one and have been here for almost 20 years in the field of teaching English. Never heard of such a test. I can practically guarantee that no J uni will know it. If anything, you will need a TOEIC or TOEFL score.

I've heard of people abroad getting engineer visas with non-engineer degrees so should be OK.
Me, too. They were married to Japanese, though, and had plenty of experience in the correct field. What have you heard?

Best of luck on getting into those schools. I have no idea what their qualifications are, but if you have any more questions, ask away!
 

Secerbus

後輩
Joined
19 Sep 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
What does the ITPEC test have to do with getting into a Japanese university? I work at one and have been here for almost 20 years in the field of teaching English. Never heard of such a test. I can practically guarantee that no J uni will know it. If anything, you will need a TOEIC or TOEFL score.

Me, too. They were married to Japanese, though, and had plenty of experience in the correct field. What have you heard?

Best of luck on getting into those schools. I have no idea what their qualifications are, but if you have any more questions, ask away!

Hello. The itpec test didn't have anything to do with universities. I mentioned it in the interest of acquiring a visa, as it allows for a person to typically skip the experience or education requirements needed for an engineer style visa.
 

Secerbus

後輩
Joined
19 Sep 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
I can find that it gives one points toward preferential treatment, but not that it alone is enough to qualify for preferential treatment. Are you certain this doesn't apply only to citizens from a few designated countries?

IPA Information-technology Promotion Agency, Japan : ITEE in Asia

Hello!

No the test can and have been taken by foreign Nationals in the Philippines.

The site does say you don't need to have experience/degree if you pass the test. So preferential treatment is applied to seekers of the engineering visa.

The points thing you are referring to is if you are applying to the highly skilled individual visa.
 

Glenski

Just me
Joined
20 Aug 2003
Messages
4,808
Reaction score
405
OK, I see how ITPEC is used now. Have never heard of it, but it seems to be a good advantage for people in your situation. You still might want to contact immigration to confirm that this is still in effect.

"ITPEC Common Examination is based on the Information Technology Engineers Examination [ITEE] in Japan, which is the biggest IT examination and de facto IT standard in Japan.For this reason, once you get the ITPEC Common Examination Certificate, it will be a big appeal to Japanese IT companies."
Advantage for Passer | ITPEC.org

"ITEE is institutionalized by Public Notice of the Ministry of Justice in order to increase the mobility of IT engineers. To the passers and holders of the examinations and the qualifications listed in the Public NoticeNote1), a preferential immigration treatment is applied. It is about the criteria pertaining to the status of residence, which is required to work in Japan as Engineer or for Designated Activities. To be more precise, when they apply for the certificate of eligibility in order to state he/she conforms to the conditions for the status of residence of Engineer or for Designated Activities, the applicant must fulfill all of following conditions.
(i) The applicant must meet one of the following 2 conditions regarding skill and/or knowledge.

  1. (a) The applicant must have graduated from university or acquired an education equivalent thereto while majoring in a subject related to the skills and/or knowledge necessary for performing the duties in which he/she intends to engage.
    (b) The applicant must have at least 10 years' experience.
(ii) The applicant must receive no less remuneration than would a Japanese national for comparable work.

Through this preferential treatment, if the applicant has passed the examination or obtained the qualification listed in the Public Notice, the requirement under item (i) need not be fulfilled."
IPA Information-technology Promotion Agency, Japan : ITEE in Asia


So, why are you planning to join university here if this is your way to bypass the university degree requirement?
 

Secerbus

後輩
Joined
19 Sep 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
OK, I see how ITPEC is used now. Have never heard of it, but it seems to be a good advantage for people in your situation. You still might want to contact immigration to confirm that this is still in effect.

"ITPEC Common Examination is based on the Information Technology Engineers Examination [ITEE] in Japan, which is the biggest IT examination and de facto IT standard in Japan.For this reason, once you get the ITPEC Common Examination Certificate, it will be a big appeal to Japanese IT companies."
Advantage for Passer | ITPEC.org

"ITEE is institutionalized by Public Notice of the Ministry of Justice in order to increase the mobility of IT engineers. To the passers and holders of the examinations and the qualifications listed in the Public NoticeNote1), a preferential immigration treatment is applied. It is about the criteria pertaining to the status of residence, which is required to work in Japan as Engineer or for Designated Activities. To be more precise, when they apply for the certificate of eligibility in order to state he/she conforms to the conditions for the status of residence of Engineer or for Designated Activities, the applicant must fulfill all of following conditions.
(i) The applicant must meet one of the following 2 conditions regarding skill and/or knowledge.

  1. (a) The applicant must have graduated from university or acquired an education equivalent thereto while majoring in a subject related to the skills and/or knowledge necessary for performing the duties in which he/she intends to engage.
    (b) The applicant must have at least 10 years' experience.
(ii) The applicant must receive no less remuneration than would a Japanese national for comparable work.

Through this preferential treatment, if the applicant has passed the examination or obtained the qualification listed in the Public Notice, the requirement under item (i) need not be fulfilled."
IPA Information-technology Promotion Agency, Japan : ITEE in Asia


So, why are you planning to join university here if this is your way to bypass the university degree requirement?

I've confirmed with Immigration already.

Well, it may seem silly but I never had a University experience. And in later years I've sort of wanted one. Obviously getting one in Japan in comparison to Sweden is dumb on so many levels. But at the moment I'm still at the application stage, and since the Japanese courses at Uni pretty much have the same application process, I plan to apply to both Japanese courses and a Degree, just to see If I get accepted.

If I don't, ill study Japanese and the the ITPEC. If i do, I'll consider it further. At the moment I'm still assembling the required documents. I am also doing this as a way of ensuring that I somehow end up in Japan. So I'm trying to ensure my stay from multiple approaches.
 

Glenski

Just me
Joined
20 Aug 2003
Messages
4,808
Reaction score
405
Thanks for the explanation. You might also want to look into an internship visa. That way, you could test the waters with your current experience and show the company what you are like. If they want to hire you, you'd have the ITPEC certification.

Alternately, you could simply get accepted to a language school here. That would allow you to work part-time as well, with special permission.

Best of luck.
 

Secerbus

後輩
Joined
19 Sep 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
Thanks for the explanation. You might also want to look into an internship visa. That way, you could test the waters with your current experience and show the company what you are like. If they want to hire you, you'd have the ITPEC certification.

Alternately, you could simply get accepted to a language school here. That would allow you to work part-time as well, with special permission.

Best of luck.

Yeah the testing the waters part I agree with. Currently plan if University falls through is to do language classes for 6 months over the summer while working 28 hours a week(as allowed on student visa) with my current job. My boss was kind enough to let me reduce the hours.

And then apply for uni or work in the fall.

Thanks for all the advice!
 

Secerbus

後輩
Joined
19 Sep 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
Explain what this means.

On a student visa assuming you get a work permit you are allowed to work 28 hours a week. My job is remote, so by taxing my income in Japan I am able to retain my current IT job on lower hours while doing Uni/Language school.
 

Glenski

Just me
Joined
20 Aug 2003
Messages
4,808
Reaction score
405
I don't think Japan will tax anything you make with a remote job. If the money goes to a Japanese bank, perhaps, otherwise the 28 hours per week that you are allowed will be devoted to anything you do for a Japanese employer instead.
 

Secerbus

後輩
Joined
19 Sep 2017
Messages
12
Reaction score
1
I don't think Japan will tax anything you make with a remote job. If the money goes to a Japanese bank, perhaps, otherwise the 28 hours per week that you are allowed will be devoted to anything you do for a Japanese employer instead.

I've checked this actually, it's really hard to find info on it though. But the way it works is that if income is generated by a person located in the country, and the person is the source of the income, then it's taxable.

So I gotta tax it once I get to Japan. Also confirmed with immigration that this kind of job is allowed, she said yes. But I imagine I'll find out in Japan when I ask there as well, or on the permission form I gotta fill out, as it requires you to state the nature of work.
 
Top Bottom