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Question Permanent Visa and cycling

franck.f

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In my own country I was cycling alot on a daily basis but here in Japan I've never bought a bike because of the fear that getting a ticket for some inadvertent road violation would jeopardize a future application for a Permanent Visa.
Is my fear a little bit over the top?
A fine can prevent you from getting a PR, right?
 

thomas

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Welcome to the forum, Franck! I know that this is mainly about PR, but I invite you to post anything bicycle-related to our sister site, Tokyo Cycling Club. :emoji_point_left:

Unless you cause a serious accident I wouldn't worry too much.

  1. Remember that being approved for Permanent Residence requires a (nearly) perfect record in terms of your conduct. This means more than having no criminal convictions. Being briefly detained when a friend’s friend is found with drugs, being peripherally involved in a bar altercation, or being involved in a traffic accident could all make a Permanent Residence application difficult. The longer the delay, the greater the chance thant an incident will arise that may cause your Permanent Residence application to be denied.
Source: Applying for Japan Permanent Residence | Japan Visa
 
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Since the bicycle is not a driver's license system, it is not a penalty point method by a ticket for violation.
For that reason,When having caused a casualty by collision with a pedestrian, it's arrested.
(Be careful not to do in bicycle driving.)
1.No-light driving of bicycles at night.
2.Two people riding on a bicycle at the same time is dangerous.
3.One-handed driving of an umbrella on a rainy day.
 One-handed operation of mobile phone.
(Because the bicycle crashed into the pedestrian and there was a fatal accident)
4.Driving while intoxicated
5.Bicycle driving of brake badness. (no brake piste)
 

johnnyG

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 One-handed operation of mobile phone.
On one of my rides, a riverside bike path, it's not too rare to see a high school boy leaning forward with both forearms on the handlebars, using both hands on the phone.

Safer than one-handed use...? ;)
 
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In Kawasaki city in Kanagawa prefecture in December 2017,
The 20-year-old female university student who was doing smart phone operation collides with a walking 77-year-old lady while riding an electromotive bicycle.
The accident of which a pedestrian dies has happened.
「自転車スマホ」で死亡事故、元女子大生に禁錮2年(佐藤仁) - 個人 - Yahoo!ニュース

Female college student is 2 years imprisonment.
Female college student dropped out of college.
Female university student's life has ended by smart phone operation for 5-6 seconds.
I think , from now on , She can not get marriage nor getting a job.
 

KyushuWoozy

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some inadvertent road violation would jeopardize a future application for a Permanent Visa.
I've seen several people online saying that even though they got points and fine on their driving license they still got PR. Wonder if it's an urban myth that such trivial matters can prevent PR?
 
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I'm going to Japan on a long-term visa in October. As an avid cyclist my first purchase (beside SIM-card and SUICA) will be a bicycle. I would really appreciate if anyone sheds some light on some of my questions:

1) Do i have to re-register my bike if i change my address (i will be staying at a dormitory for a week while formalities to move to a rental apartment are being done )
2) Is cycling allowed on roads and motorways? I figure most Japanese prefer to cycle on sidewalks, but if i am legally allowed to cycle on the roads i will probably do so. Did so while staying in China and found it much more convenient than cycling on sidewalks.
3) Have you ever witnessed a person getting busted for cycling under influence? As illegal as it may be - i have never been asked to undergo alcohol test neither in China nor in Russia, even when stopped for other offenses like cycling on a highway or ignoring traffic lights. To put it simply, is it a safe bet to take a tipsy ride home after a couple shots of whisky or glasses of wine?
4) Can you recommend a second-hand bike dealer around Eastern Tokyo/ Ichikawa city? As of now i consider a purchase at AEON Bike.
 

thomas

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1.) You're supposed to, but I still have some bicycles registered at my previous residence in Tokyo (I'm in Kanagawa now). I have never been checked in fifteen years. In my experience, MTBs and road bikes are rarely ever stopped.

2.) Yes, it is. You're actually supposed to ride on the road, though some cops will claim the opposite. Some pavements have dedicated bicycle lanes.

Most motorways are fine but you will see traffic signs such as the one below on roads which are off-limits (as are fly-overs, many bridges, and, of course, highways).



3.) Just anecdotal, but I have never seen anyone getting busted for drink-riding. If you do cause an accident in a state of intoxication, however, you will be in trouble.

Generally speaking, I wish the police would enforce traffic regulations more strictly on cyclists (and not only go after stolen mama-chari or pretend to pay attention during traffic safety week).

4.) Sign up to our sister site. We have a classifieds section. Also, our members will be glad to help you with all your questions.

 

TGI-ECT

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In some communities since a bit back they have been pushing rather hard about the new law related to folks must ride on the street and not the sidewalk. My wife used to get on my case about that, but these days the medical folks don't want me using a bicycle, so my wife has also backed off about the constant warning of following the new law. I don't know how 'new' it is now, but there was a big deal in the media a bit back about getting bicycle riding off the sidewalks.

And about the purchasing of second-hand bicycles, I think you might check some city government sites about whether that particular city sells used bikes. That was how I bought the bike I presently have, but that was probably more than 10 or so years ago and things change. But it sure was a good deal, even if it was one heck of a ride from that city back into the mountains where we were living at that time.
 

musicisgood

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Yes, some cities have that selling bicycles fixed up by retired volunteers . Also maybe the police station has connections with the universities to sell the bikes to foreigners attending the local universities.
 
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