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origin of japanese martial arts

Glenn

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And why would he; you're only Japanese. :? BTW, I hate when people write "jiu jutsu" or "jiu jitsu" or whatever, although I must admit that the pronunciation of 術 does sound close to じつ sometimes. Maybe it's just me? Anyway, I prefer "jテサ jutsu."

And thank you for answering my question. 🙂 🙂
 

Golgo_13

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Glenn said:
And why would he; you're only Japanese. :? BTW, I hate when people write "jiu jutsu" or "jiu jitsu" or whatever, although I must admit that the pronunciation of 術 does sound close to じつ sometimes. Maybe it's just me? Anyway, I prefer "jテサ jutsu."

And thank you for answering my question. 🙂 🙂

Many Japanese have a hard time pronouncing the word for "surgery" as well: Shujutsu. I've heard little kids saying "shiritsu." 🙂

Nobody ever says "Jiu Do" -- it's Judo. So why should it be "Jiu Jitsu"?

I wonder if the French say Joudeau. :D

BTW, your location says "USA/BR." What's BR? Brazil?
 

Mandylion

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The whole jijutsu and jujitsu thing has thrown more than one martial arts thread on some other forums into huge, raging flame wars. I forget what they all decided, but my, how the fur did fly (there were some other elements at play, but they centered the whole thing on the ju/ji issue.)
 

Glenn

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I can't see the argument at all. Maybe I just don't know all of the romanization systems... :?

Golgo_13 said:
BTW, your location says "USA/BR." What's BR? Brazil?

Lol, no, it's Baton Rouge. I just didn't feel like putting that in the "location" field, so I went with the abbreviation. That's funny that you thought that, though (to me, at least). I guess you were thinking "nationality/location?"
 

ippolito

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It looks that young jp don't follow jp martial arts...

the martial arts arrived from China to Okinawa by sailors that were chinese boxing experts...the okinawans learn and transmormed these tyles
as to be more effective as for they phisical costition not tall but strong
short arms and leg differente from chineses...
so they created the euchy ryu ishinryu goju ryu stiles and some japanese went there and or other from Okinawa went in Japan
and trasfomed in the new karate Funagoshi, Otsuka after Nakayama
and the Japan Karate Associan went in the Us (Nakayama) and Shirai
Enoeda Kase and others in Europe.
In south america pacific ocean side came strongly Kenpo.
also some styles from Hawai.
Main styles in Japan are Shotokan Wadoryu Shito ryu Gouju ryu and all over the world.
some teach ninjitsu I cannot say a word about....i do not speak about
an argoment that I do not know, my impression was that came out only for grow more new schools...but I never meet a real ninjitsu master.
There are many shools of self defence that teach ninja' s technics....
The okinawans could not use swords or knifes as per the japanese army control and orderrs so they began to use agricolture struments and began to be masters in Kobudo....tonfa sai nunchaku and bo are the most known...meanwhile Iaido and Kyuodo were learned in Japan (samurai).
In many tournemnts there are kobudo categories katas.
Personally I learned an old okinawan Bo kata.
From Jujitsu in Japan Higoro Kano transformed in Judo as a sport and
became an olimpic sport.

I think that Kendo grown in Japan coming from the ia jitsu kumite'
with swords...but kendo allows to do kumite' without bad injuries.
Unfortanly the japanese styles and senseis divided mordern karate
and grown 1000s of federations in alll the world...and lost the opportunity to be reconized by the Cio olympic games.
They lost power....and Taekwondo took the opportunity in Korea olympic games and reconized.
I am not sure but I think there are more karate praticants in the world than Taekwondo.
But politics are more important sometime than numbers.
have all a nice day
Ippolito




Mandylion said:
I'm sorry if this is old hat (or even if it is wrong) but here is what I have come to understand - I'll try and find some reliable sources for you to look at later ("web" and "reliable" often don't go hand in hand). Please correct me if I am mistaken.

I have no idea how martial arts made the jump from China to Japan, but I would imagine there was some form of martial arts in Japan - imported fro China or no - well before Buddhism arrived in the 7th century AD. Japan by that time had an advanced political and military structure and it would stand to reason some fighting systems of their own - not 100% unique systems, but ones that could be said to be Japanese. The bow - kyujutsu or kyudo in the modern period - has been documented as becoming more than just a hunting tool aroudn 250 BC. I woudn't have any problem saying the introduction of Buddhism had some sort of impact on Japanese arts.

However, we don't really see a strong bond between Buddhism and the martial arts until much later. Even then, we still see an emphasis in most arts in the "jutsu" or technique of fighting, than the "do" or means of person development (a stronger transition to the use of "do" didn't happen until the fairly peaceful Tokugawa Shogunates). Basic forms were probably developed much earlier, but what we think of as kendo, judo, aikido etc. would need to be traced back much, much further to find concrete links to China. Right now that is beyond my resources....
 

Golgo_13

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Glenn said:
I can't see the argument at all. Maybe I just don't know all of the romanization systems... :?

Lol, no, it's Baton Rouge. I just didn't feel like putting that in the "location" field, so I went with the abbreviation. That's funny that you thought that, though (to me, at least). I guess you were thinking "nationality/location?"

Then you're Playaa's neighbor. I thought you were an American living in Brazil.

One indigenous (not coming from China) form of fighting is Sumo. Today, Sumo is more of a sport with rules and regulations, e.g., no strikes to the face with fist allowed (but open hand OK), but in prehistoric times such strikes and even kicks were permitted.


"Sumo in its early days tended to be violent with no holds barred--often a veritable fight to the finish. The Nihon Shoki (Chronicles of Japan), from 720, records the first bout between lowly mortals as taking place in 23 BC. Emperor Suinin (r. 29BC - AD70) is said to have made a special request to Nomi no Sukune, a potter from Izumo, to fight Taima no Kehaya [("Keru"=to kick; "haya(i)=fast)]. The two wrestled for quite a while until Sukune finally delivered a set of devastating kicks to Kehaya's stomach and torso. Kehaya was mortally wounded, and Sukune, the victor, has been immortalized ever since as the 'father of Sumo.' Obviously, times have changed and now injuries are rare inside the Sumo ring. "



From http://papa.essortment.com/wrestlingsumoh_rvqp.htm
 

ippolito

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Sorry I am ignorant about Sumo as to speak about.. i a very japanese martial arts and not so popular in the wordl
 
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