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object to/disagree with/don't agree with/opose/be against

hirashin

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Dear native English speakers,
Would all the sentences have almost the same meaning?
(a) I object to smoking here.
(b) I disagree with smoking here.
(c) I don't agree with smoking here.
(d) I oppose smoking here.
(e) I'm opposed to smoking here.
(f) I'm against smoking here.

Thanks in advance.
Hirashin
 

Lothor

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Dear native English speakers,
Would all the sentences have almost the same meaning?
(a) I object to smoking here.
(b) I disagree with smoking here.
(c) I don't agree with smoking here.
(d) I oppose smoking here.
(e) I'm opposed to smoking here.
(f) I'm against smoking here.

Thanks in advance.
Hirashin

The sentence sounds like someone referring to a single instance of someone smoking and actually none of them would be likely to be used by a native speaker, who would either point out that smoking was forbidden, e.g., . 'Sorry, you're not allowed to smoke here' or ask the person not to smoke, e.g., 'Please could you not smoke here'.

(a) sounds a bit too pompous for normal speech.
(b)-(f) would be OK if referring to smoking more generally. e.g. Most people in Britain, even many smokers, are now against smoking in indoor public areas.

Hope that helps.
 

hirashin

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Thank you for the help, Lothor. But I'm afraid I cannot fully understand what you mean, Lothor.

Would the sentences be used if they are general statement?
 

OoTmaster

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Depends on your meaning. Does the speaker think that personally they should not smoke in the location or that no one should be able to smoke in the location? To me the meaning is a bit ambiguous. "I'm opposed to smoking here" can mean the speaker is opposed to smoking there or that the speaker is opposed to anyone smoking in the location.
 

hirashin

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Would these sentences be more clear?
(a2) I object to anyone smoking here.
(b2) I disagree with anyone smoking here.
(c2) I don't agree with anyone smoking here.
(d) I oppose anyone smoking here.
(e) I'm opposed to anyone smoking here.
(f) I'm against anyone smoking here.
 

OoTmaster

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Yes. The meaning of the sentences are now clear and have no ambiguity. Do note that there's nothing grammatically wrong with the other sentences. I just wanted you to be aware that their meaning wasn't clear. With additional context it's possible you would use those exact sentences.
 
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