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Nishiki rice cooking

Smeagol

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Alrite forum, just registered to ask a simple question to all members for some help on rice cooking... so here goes:
I have just bought myself a 'Breville RC3 Rice Cooker' and have a bag of Nishiki rice, the query is: Does anyone know the rice/water ratio, but more importantly the 'The amount of cooking time for perfection' by using this rice cooker, as this is my first time cooking Japanese rice. 😌
I am planning to cook the rice for multi-purpose (sushi, maki, steamed etc.)
but I also know that different rice has different cooking times too.
If anyone has the experience of using a Breville RC3 and Nishiki rice, I need your info :) lol
OH!! by the way, how do you check/tell that the rice is cooked to perfection so that its not over or under cooked?? what do you look for??
Well, the rest is up to you's now to help me out :)
 

DoctorP

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We usually use 1/2 cup more water than rice. Meaning if I washed 3 cups of rice, then I would cook it with 3 1/2 cups of water. That is the way my wife has always done it. We used Nishiki for a while, but switched a few years back.

As for cooking time...all of the rice cookers we had were automatic, so I do not know what to tell you.
 

Smeagol

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Cheers Doc :) at least am half way there now. curious on what rice you now use instead of nishiki tho :p
 

DoctorP

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I don't have the bag here, but next time I buy a bag, I will be sure to post the name for you.
 

Smeagol

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Awesome doc :)
Well forum, I have gotten the rice/water ratio, just need to know the cooking times. I read the manual, unfortunately its says for 'white rice' which is no help. Stated times for cooking via manual.
* Based on 2 cups: cooking time 15 mins. * But as you know Nishiki rice isn't normal rice you would be able to by at tesco's :p
however, when reading various posts from different sites, they says after the cooking times, switch the setting on keep warm mode, and leave for another 15 mins or so before serving.
Don't know if this helps with the rice or not tho. If anyone in the forum knows the 'cooking time' for the RC3, it would make things easier, not to mention the wasted amount of rice testing to get the time right (obviously am still gonna eat it, not necessarily enjoy it tho) 😌 lol
 

hplaserjet6p

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for me, water should be just covering the second joint of my fingers when i put my hand flat on the rice.

nishiki is white rice, so you can use the cooking times on the manual.
i cook basmati rice in the same way, and its edible.
and yea, better to leave it for a while after the cooker beeps.
 

Smeagol

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k, i did my first test today using 1 cup of Nishiki rice to 1-1/2 cups of water, cooked for 13 1/2 mins, quick stir around, then setting on warm for 15 mins.

Rice was a little firm but didnt have a crunch to it :) nice tasty rice tho, lovely and sticky, perfect for sushi :) Does this sound the right texture for the rice to be or does it need to be different??
 

Han Chan

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Wow, I thought that Smeagol only likes raw fish?

My Zojirushi cooker is a high-tech computerised japanese one. The cooking time is not for me to decide - the damned thing decides itself. I find that it is best to soak the rice for some 3 minutes and then rinse it a few times. The rice to water ratio should be 1:1,2 or 4:5. I would think that boiling 15 min. would be fine. It is important not to take of the lid after boiling. Let the rice rest for at least 5 min. before checking. Sorry if you are too curious, but patience pays off.
 

cacawate

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This is what I used to do, back in the day; before I bought an automagic rice cooker:

Step 1. Rinse the rice. A lot of sites suggest rinsing the rice until the water is clear, but this is not needed. Rinse it 2 or 3 times and you should be good.

Step 2. Add water. This amount varies, person-to-person, as well. I would add water about an 3/4 of an inch to an inch over the rice. You want to give it a good boiling and steaming amount of water.

Step 3. Let it set. Let the rice set there in all that lovely water. Why? I have no idea, but I'm sure someone on the internet will be able to tell you. I let it set for 30 minutes.

Step 4. Bring it to a boil. After you've let it set you are going to want to bring it to a boil. You can set the flame at medium to high heat to quickly achieve this.

Step 5. Let it simmer. After you see it begin to boil, bring the heat down to a low setting. You will then let it cook until you cannot see the water anymore. This may take 10 to 15 minutes.

Step 6. Let it steam. Once you see that the water above the rice has evaporated, turn the flame off and allow it to steam-cook itself for 15 or so more minutes.

Step 7. Eat the rice. Enough said.

As you can see this whole fiasco can take well over an hour. When making food that required rice, I would always have to start cooking it before the main course. The amazing thing about the automatic rice cookers is that your rice will be ready in about 15 minutes, and you don't have to do all the above steps. I've never even rinsed my rice with the auto-cooker.

That said, I would suggest buying one for the efficiency and convenience, but I will not say that cooking rice the "old-fashioned" way is not fun. It can just be very frustrating if you miss a step and get under/overcooked rice.

I hope this helps a bit. Oh, and by the way, I use Koshihikari brand rice and used a regular pot for cooking the rice before.

Itadakimasu!
 

Smeagol

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WOW catawate!! Thank you so much for the very detailed instructions, and i will certainly look into the automatic cookers too :) bet it can become quite daunting when cooking the old fashioned way, but rewarding at times, more so when guests are around :)
 
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