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Nihongo Sou-Matome N3 Textbooks

kunonabi

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I've been using this series of textbooks the last two years to study for the N3 but on both tests the vocab didn't seem to resemble what I had studied in the books at all. The first time I figured I just didn't study hard enough since I only failed by a few points on the overall score. The second time I had much better preparation but the vocab seemed even more unfamiliar and I did worse. I tried matching the vocab in the books with various guides online and they aren't matching up. The book says its designed for the new N3 but I'm wondering if I should switch to a different set of books. Does anyone have experience with this series?
 

nekojita

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The new JLPT tests do not have such a thing as a test specification. There is no word list. There is no kanji list. There is no grammar list.

What most sites do have copied old lists for 1-4kyuu (N1, N2, N4 and N5) and since there isn't an old level corresponding to N3, they try to figure out what goes in there from a mix of past tests and interpolating in from either side.

Also, I would expect a lot of these websites to just copy off one another, so various online sources agreeing doesn't necessarily mean anything.

Basically, don't take any book/list as a complete guide to what's going to be on the test. And you shouldn't only be studying from JLPT test materials. Try to find things you can read (NHK Easy? other basic non-fiction?) , and pick up vocabulary more organically.
 

jlptbook

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I've been using this series of textbooks the last two years to study for the N3 but on both tests the vocab didn't seem to resemble what I had studied in the books at all. The first time I figured I just didn't study hard enough since I only failed by a few points on the overall score. The second time I had much better preparation but the vocab seemed even more unfamiliar and I did worse. I tried matching the vocab in the books with various guides online and they aren't matching up. The book says its designed for the new N3 but I'm wondering if I should switch to a different set of books. Does anyone have experience with this series?
If you want to GOUKAKU N3 level, you need to master N2, because in Dokkai test they will get alot from N2.
The same with N2, you need to master N1!
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
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If you want to GOUKAKU N3 level, you need to master N2, because in Dokkai test they will get alot from N2.
The same with N2, you need to master N1!

So you're saying the only way to pass level N3 is to be able to pass N2.....and the only way to pass N2 is to be able to pass N1?

Does that not sound like nonsense to you?
 

jlptbook

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So you're saying the only way to pass level N3 is to be able to pass N2.....and the only way to pass N2 is to be able to pass N1?

Does that not sound like nonsense to you?
I mean that you master, and master doesn't mean you will pass.
 

jlptbook

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Than you don't understand the meaning of the word "master".
yes i will never understand full...
Master in Japanese is: 先生 or 教師、but in Chinese master is 師父(Shīfu)、and if you call someone in Taiwan is: 師父(Shīfu) that is you call a taxi driver.
In vietnamese: master that you call a character in a film...
 

Mike Cash

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yes i will never understand full...
Master in Japanese is: 先生 or 教師、but in Chinese master is 師父(Shīfu)、and if you call someone in Taiwan is: 師父(Shīfu) that is you call a taxi driver.
In vietnamese: master that you call a character in a film...

In English you used it as a verb. To master something means to have a full understanding or control of it. A person who can't pass a level certainly hasn't mastered it. A person who passed with a not-so-good score also hasn't mastered it.
 
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