What's new

Ni or e?

maji

後輩
13 Aug 2003
168
0
26
hi, straightforward question, but I wasn't sure about this one:
when I want to say something like

watashi wa keiko-san tegami ni kakimasu.

Is then "ni kakimasu" or "e kakimasu" correct? I know the difference between e and ni in matters of moving, but if both are correct, what would be in this matter the difference in the meaning of the sentence?
thx for any replies
 
watashi wa keiko-san tegami ni kakimasu.
I think it would be..「私はケイコさんに手紙を書きます。」
'watashi wa keiko-san ni tegami o kakimasu'
Therefore you are *writing* the letter *to* Keiko.
Someone can correct me if I'm wrong though
(Katakana used just to illustrate Keiko is a name, not sure of the kani for it.)


:)
 
I would say "keiko-san ni tegami o kakimasu."

~~~

"ni" refers to action towards something, and reaching that point.

"e" refers to action towards something, in the general direction, but not necessarily reaching the target.


~~~

Consider these sentences regarding swimming in a river:

kawa ni oyogu = swim into a river (from outside the river, like from the sea)

kawa e oyogu = swim towards a river

kawa de oyogu = swim in a river

kawa o oyogu = swim the entire length of a river


"ni" can also refer to what I call actionless action, or action without motion: Tokyo ni sunde imasu = I live in Tokyo.
 
Originally posted by Buntaro
I would say "keiko-san ni tegami o kakimasu."

~~~

"ni" refers to action towards something, and reaching that point.

"e" refers to action towards something, in the general direction, but not necessarily reaching the target.

I would phrase it that way as well, but I find this interesting: using "ni" in this sentence seems more natural to me (although I am a non-native speaker, so take that for whatever it is worth), but saying "Keiko e no tegami" for "a letter to Keiko" is perfectly acceptable, and I believe more common. Perhaps it has something to do with "no" overriding "ni" in these situations...
 
Originally posted by Glenn
I would phrase it that way as well, but I find this interesting: using "ni" in this sentence seems more natural to me (although I am a non-native speaker, so take that for whatever it is worth), but saying "Keiko e no tegami" for "a letter to Keiko" is perfectly acceptable, and I believe more common. Perhaps it has something to do with "no" overriding "ni" in these situations...
Actually I think it's the only way you can say sending a letter to Keiko as opposed to sending Keiko a letter, or Sore wa Keiko e no tegami desu (This is a letter for Keiko). And the pattern shows up across a variety of different situations ("Shakai e no houshi wa dare ni demo motomerarete imasu." (Community service is required of everyone))....not for the community, just towards.
 
Back
Top Bottom