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New Japanese banknotes in 2024

thomas

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Although this was announced over half a year ago, I thought it would be interesting to take a look at the new Japanese bills that will be issued in 2024 and the 500-yen coin (to be issued in 2021).

The new notes will be issued in the first half of fiscal 2024 and will be the first new bills since 2004. To combat counterfeiters, the Japanese government releases new notes every twenty years. The new bills will incorporate the latest anti-counterfeiting features. According to Asahi News, as many, as 1,698 forged notes were found in Japan in 2018.

Five-hundred-yen coins were first issued in 1982 to replace the old 500-yen notes. The first series, however, was too similar in weight and size to Korean 500-won coins (back then equivalent to about 50 yen), so they were replaced with the current 500-yen coins minted since 2000.

The new 10,000-yen banknote will feature Shibusawa Eichii (渋沢 栄一, 1840-1931), the "father of Japanese capitalism" and an illustration of the Marunouchi facade of Tokyo Station on the reverse.

new-ten-thousand-yen-bill.jpg



Five-thousand-yen notes seem to be reserved for famous female personalities. The new 5000-yen note displays Tsuda Umeko (津田梅子, 1864-1929), one of the first Japanese women to study abroad. She was the youngest of five girls who accompanied the Iwakura Mission to the United States in 1871. In Washington DC she studied at private girls' schools and was later baptised. In 1900, she founded Joshi Eigaku Juku (女子英学塾 Women's Institute for English Studies) in Tōkyō, later renamed to Tsuda College. The reverse shows an illustration of wisteria flowers.

new-five-thousand-yen-bill.jpg


The relatively rare 2,000-yen bill will not be redesigned,

The obverse of the new 1000-yen bill features Kitasato Shibasaburō (北里 柴三郎, 1853-1931) who studied under Robert Koch in Germany. Later, he became a famous bacteriologist and co-discovered the infectious agent of bubonic plague in Hongkong in 1894. He was also the first dean of the Faculty of Medicine of Keiō University as well as the first president of the Japan Medical Association. The reverse features “The Great Wave off Kanagawa,” the famous woodblock print by ukiyo-e artist Katsushika Hokusai (葛飾北斎).


new-one-thousand-yen-bill.jpg


The new 500-yen coin will be issued in the first half of 2021. The new coin will feature a two-coloured, three-layered structure. The current 500 yen coin has grooves of the same size while the new one has differently-sized grooves on its side.

new-500-yen-coin.jpg






 
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Majestic

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I feel bad that Fukuzawa Yukichi is disappearing from the bank notes. I think he was a true visionary, and unique, and more-or-less uncoopted by various political ideologies. He's an inspiring figure. The new group of faces are completely unknown to me. Putting "the father of Japanese capitalism" on the 10000 note is, somehow appropriate, but also seems a big step down from Fukuzawa Yukichi. I do like the designs on the revers sides, though.
 

joadbres

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I see that the new (3rd generation) 500 yen coin has "Japan" written twice along the edge on the obverse side, and also hidden inside of the large 0's on the reverse--visible when viewed at an angle. I wonder if this marks the first time that the English word "Japan" has appeared on Japanese currency. Did the Prime Minister sign off on this??

Five-hundred yen coins were first issued in 1982 to replace the old 500-yen notes but were too similar in weight and size to Korean 500-won coins (with only one-tenth of their value).
The way this is worded suggests that the Japanese coins were one-tenth the value of the Korean ones, when the opposite is true.
 

musicisgood

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Its just all paper to me. Worthless, just worthless. Don't you all just agree with me.
What I'm saying, if in the event of a disaster and the banks are all closed, its worthless unless it remains its true value, which in most cases it doesn't.
Just bought a 58 gram bag of chips for 100 yen. Unbelievable 20 years ago.
 
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thomas

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The way this is worded suggests that the Japanese coins were one-tenth the value of the Korean ones when the opposite is true.

Thank you, I have corrected this.

I feel bad that Fukuzawa Yukichi is disappearing from the banknotes. I think he was a true visionary, and unique, and more-or-less uncoopted by various political ideologies. He's an inspiring figure. The new group of faces are completely unknown to me. Putting "the father of Japanese capitalism" on the 10000 note is, somehow appropriate, but also seems a big step down from Fukuzawa Yukichi. I do like the designs on the reverse sides, though.

What impressed me in Shibusawa (and I'd never heard of him before his "nomination" in April) wasn't his pioneering role in introducing Western capitalism to Japan but his philanthropism and moral principles. However, I agree with you that he isn't of Fukuzawa's calibre.

Hard to say who else might qualify for the 10,000-yen note. Scientists, artists, and poets are the least controversial, but they only seem to be featured on 1000-yen bills. A few faces I'd like to see on any future banknote would be Sugihara Chiune, Miyazawa Kenji, Kurosawa Akira, and Yosano Akiko.
 

TGI-ECT

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I remember those 500won/500yen coin problems. That really was a rather bad problem back then.

I also seem to remember a friend told me that it was such an easy slide for some bad folks not getting too carried away with tricks, as they could just use a great smooth, straight face and claim they really hadn't noticed they used the wrong coin. That made the problem even worse.

But the number one question is how could it have been that some smart government worker didn't figure out in the very beginning a problem would exist?
 
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