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Need Help Translating WW2 Currency

Gunner Shane

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Hello, I recently purchased a "short snorter" from the ww2 era. A "short snorter" is currency signed by a flight crew. There are several names which I believe to Japanese signed on it. I understand the banknote is from China but it is from Japanese occupied China. The writing is to the left and the right of the picture of the Chinese leader, and on the back side beneath the red serial number. I need help translating to further my research. Any help would be much appreciated.
 

Gunner Shane

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Shanghai - Wikipedia

1930 was not the WWII era in Shanghai. Why do you assume the signatures are Japanese?
I understand when the WW2 era is, just because currency is printed in a certain year does not mean it wasn't in circulation during WW2. The top back of the note is hand inscribed 1944. I assumed it was Japanese writing because it came from a Japanese-American war veterans estate, but with that said the U.S. was known to put Asian Americans in the same regiment to help translate within the pacific. I was just wandering if any of the inscriptions were Japanese? It was also attached to several WW2 era Japanese bank notes if anybody is interested in looking at those as well.
 

Mike Cash

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Japanese would have written the year as Showa 19
 

Mike Cash

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I don't know about anyone else, but I'd enjoy seeing the other notes if you'd like to share them.
 

Gunner Shane

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I don't know about anyone else, but I'd enjoy seeing the other notes if you'd like to share them.
Sure thing Mike! I will post the photos with a little info. They are not in the best condition but that just adds to the charm of where they came from.
The first image is 10 Yen, you can see a U.S. Major signed the top left. Also somebody with a typewriter typed Guam.
The second is a propaganda leaflet, dropped by the 58th bomb squadron, I will post the back so you can read the message.
The third is 5 Yen, which says "Removed from a Dead Jap in a cave on Iwo Jima"
The fourth is an occupied China 10 Yen note. They stamped the notes with bold red characters on both sides.
The fifth is a 100 Yen note, dated on the bottom 1945
Hope you Enjoy!

 

Mike Cash

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The second is a propaganda leaflet, dropped by the 58th bomb squadron, I will post the back so you can read the message.

In brief, it points out the terrible inflation brought about as a result of Japan's war activities.

Hope you Enjoy!

All but the one which is an unsigned confession of robbing the dead, for which the guy should have been prosecuted.
 

Toritoribe

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I need help translating to further my research. Any help would be much appreciated.
The two Chinese names on the front side are 林伯奇 and 孫狼邦. The surname of the one on the back side is 陳, but I can't read his given name.
 

Gunner Shane

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In brief, it points out the terrible inflation brought about as a result of Japan's war activities.



All but the one which is an unsigned confession of robbing the dead, for which the guy should have been prosecuted.
I see your point of view. my friend, when it comes war relics. In fact no one was prosecuted for taking war relics, there was a government program where the soldiers used to fill out forms, so they could take home such items. A lot of Katanas ended up in the United States after the war, which is sad since they are family heirlooms. And lot of items were taken from the POWS by the Japenese vice versa, just another cost of war.
 

Mike Cash

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There is a difference between "taking war relics" and "stealing". Items of military kit are one thing, personal possessions are something else and the taking of them is looting and plundering.

Any act which would be considered vile if done to an American soldier must also be considered vile if done by an American soldier.
 

Gunner Shane

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There is a difference between "taking war relics" and "stealing". Items of military kit are one thing, personal possessions are something else and the taking of them is looting and plundering.

Any act which would be considered vile if done to an American soldier must also be considered vile if done by an American soldier.
I disagree. There was psychological difference in the war between the Japanese and the Americans. Japanese were taking items to destroy them, to advance there ideology of conquering the western world. While the Americans were taking items to remember the cause of leaving home to defend the future of the world. At least items like these are here to remember the consequences of war.
 

Mike Cash

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You have a comic book understanding of the war.
 
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Gunner Shane

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You have a comic book understanding of the war.
Lol Your going to have to explain that comment? Its sad you can sit up on your pedestal and judge people. My counter argument is valid to what you were saying. You just couldn't wrap your head around it. Your talking about the morale issue of stealing items off a dead person. Your not considering the morale issues of war in the first place. I get your point of view, there is absolutely no way in justifying taking personal items off a dead person. And my point of view is if you find yourself half way across the world watching your friends get blowing up and painful reminder your there because a nation got greedy, yeah you can take some personal items off a dead solider who just tried to kill you. By the way I don't read comic books to learn about world war 2, there are plenty of memoirs and monuments in America paying tribute to the hell that soldiers went through.
 
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