What's new

Need help on translating this word(s)

UnHinged

後輩
Joined
Dec 23, 2016
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
寄ってかない

I have no idea what this word is besides the clue that 寄 is the kanji for "approach". But how did it conjugate to THAT. I know of Yoru, Yokkakaru, and yottetakatte

But this. I have no clue. Is it a contraction? I read it in a manga where they were using conversational Japanese, I attached the speech bubble it is from

I want to know the translation and how it got into that form
 

Attachments

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
Messages
16,454
Reaction score
2,233
寄って(行)かない?

Want to drop by xxxx?
 

UnHinged

後輩
Joined
Dec 23, 2016
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
寄って(行)かない?

Want to drop by xxxx?
Could you explain this to me if you may? As in how do I exactly know when something gets dropped, I mean an entire Kanji got dropped in this case and there are multiple ways to interpret kanai. Also I know ikitai was want to go, and the negative is ikitakunai? Could you break it down for me please on how yottekanai means what it is or the origin of how it became that (like it became like that due to dialect for example). I know "Don't you want to go and approach" would equal "Don't you want to drop by?" but the kanai form is confusing me.

Also, I know this sounds needy, but is that speech bubble one sentence or two sentences? I am having trouble making sense of it. She says 'haai' which I assume is 'Yeaaah' or 'Heeey' but what does 'Soko no kawainosantachi' even mean? I know soko means 'there' and kawainosantachi means 'cuties' so it means 'the cuties there' ? And there was no verb after that or anything, and if it was 'da' or a relative clause I still don't understand how it fits into the sentence. At best I can only translate the last three lines from "kyou" to "yottekanai": "Don't you want to drop by (and play) games with me today?" I don't understand how "haai soko no kawainochantachi" fits in the sentence. And a particle or verb was omitted in the sentence, right? Cause there was no 'kara' or 'shimashita' to play the games.

Also context is that she is talking to two of her friends, there is no previous conversation at least known to the reader. So I have no idea of any real context or omitting.

I really want to learn the mechanics as this is the first time I've been trying to read something outside of Genki and Human Japanese, sorry if this is a bit too much for just one sentence like this.
 
Last edited:

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
Messages
16,454
Reaction score
2,233
It isn't "kanai".

It is "ikanai" with the first bit not pronounced.

Helping Verbs: …ていく and …てくる

The speaker is calling out to a bunch of cute girls (kawaiko....not "kawaino"). The "san" is an honorific. The "tachi" makes it plural. The "haai" is just getting their attention. Imagine a comma after this bit and the rest should be easier to understand.

It isn't "go and approach". The "going" takes place after the "approaching", which is what happens when you drop by one place on the way to some other place.

From all I've heard, "Human Japanese" is somewhat of an eduturd. "Genki" is good. Did you complete both volumes?
 

UnHinged

後輩
Joined
Dec 23, 2016
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
It isn't "kanai".

It is "ikanai" with the first bit not pronounced.

Helping Verbs: …ていく and …てくる

The speaker is calling out to a bunch of cute girls (kawaiko....not "kawaino"). The "san" is an honorific. The "tachi" makes it plural. The "haai" is just getting their attention. Imagine a comma after this bit and the rest should be easier to understand.

It isn't "go and approach". The "going" takes place after the "approaching", which is what happens when you drop by one place on the way to some other place.

From all I've heard, "Human Japanese" is somewhat of an eduturd. "Genki" is good. Did you complete both volumes?
Sorry, I may have misphrased some things I was saying in my wall of text.

I know it was kawaikochan, I accidentally typed no and I know it was pluralized to cuties with tachi as I typed previously. So to clarify, haai to tachi is a PART of that whole thing as ONE sentence and should be seperated by a comma after kawaikochantachi.

What I want to know is more about ikanai turning into kanai. I can safely assume only with gerundives followed by i aka " te + iru", even if it isn't a progressive action, i no matter what maybe omitted if preceded by a gerundive? Also I had a massive brain lapse, I thought Ikonai was iku's negative, I mistakened it for kuru's negative I believe.

Yes, I completed both volumes gruelingly by myself. It isn't fun doing the partner activites by yourself. Though I finished genki almost a year ago and did human japanese afterwards review.

But, again, the first two lines do not act as a relative clause and are a part of the entire thing as one sentence, and I should put a comma right after tachi, correct? Clarify for me again please. And again, the verb or particle that would appropriate conplement 'games' is omitted and is picked up from context, correct?

Translation would be: Hey, you cuties, don't you all want to drop by (to play) video games with me today?
 

Mike Cash

骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう
Joined
Mar 15, 2002
Messages
16,454
Reaction score
2,233
But, again, the first two lines do not act as a relative clause and are a part of the entire thing as one sentence, and I should put a comma right after tachi, correct? Clarify for me again please.
Correct

Translation would be: Hey, you cuties, don't you all want to drop by (to play) video games with me today?
I took ゲーマーズ to be a proper noun, the name of a game center or something.
 

Toritoribe

松葉解禁
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Feb 22, 2008
Messages
15,574
Reaction score
2,337
ゲーマーズ must be the name of a place, most likely a video game center or like that.

EDIT:
Ooops, Mike-san beats me!

EDIT2:
What I want to know is more about ikanai turning into kanai. I can safely assume only with gerundives followed by i aka " te + iru", even if it isn't a progressive action, i no matter what maybe omitted if preceded by a gerundive?
Here are common contractions.
Contraction (grammar) - Wikipedia
 
Top